Difference between pages "Packing list for Tanzania" and "Georgia"

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{{Packing lists by country}}
 
  
This section has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[Tanzania]] and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight limit on baggage. Luggage should be durable, lockable, and easy to carry. Because you will probably travel a lot by bus, duffel bags or small internal frame backpacks are more practical than suitcases.  
+
The first Peace Corps Volunteers arrived in March 2001. They serve in rural communities and towns throughout the country, where they focus on offering and enhancing English education for Georgian students and teaching methodologies for Georgian teachers. Technical sectors in Georgia include education and non-governmental organization development.
  
There are numerous used clothes markets throughout Tanzania where you can purchase inexpensive clothing.  Tailors can also make clothing for you. It is possible in the early weeks of training to buy most clothing you will need or to expand on what you have brought. Think of East Africa as the world’s largest thrift store; the clothing will all be familiar to you. Once at site, you can pick up quality used clothing at markets that are adequate for your service. Clothing found at markets generally range from $1-$5 for an article of clothing.  In addition, clothes in Tanzania are hand washed, hung dry and ironed. Therefore, cotton items generally tend to stretch out over time and some materials are not durable enough to endure hand washing.
 
  
 +
==Peace Corps History==
  
===General Clothing ===
+
''Main article: [[History of the Peace Corps in Georgia]]''
  
Tanzanians generally dress more conservatively than Americans do. During pre-service training and in office or school settings, you will be expected to dress professionally. This means closed-toe shoes or sandals, trousers (not jeans), and shirts with collars for men and below-the-knee dresses or skirts for women. Although you can dress more casually while at home, most Tanzanians do not approve of short shorts, tank tops, or dirty or ripped clothing.  
+
As early as 1994, the government of Georgia indicated its desire to host Peace Corps Volunteers. Although the Peace Corps sent an assessment team to Georgia in response to that request, a decision to enter Georgia was indefinitely postponed due to security concerns over civil unrest in the Abkhazia and Ossetia provinces. In 1997, the Georgian government formally reiterated its desire to host Peace Corps Volunteers, and again an assessment team was sent. Although the security situation had significantly improved by this time, budgetary constraints prevented the Peace Corps from acting upon this request, and the decision was delayed yet again. In late 1999, after repeated inquiries from the Georgian government and consistent accounts from the U.S. Embassy in Tbilisi that the security situation remained conducive to the presence of Peace Corps Volunteers, the decision was made to reassess the possibility of setting up a program. The review was positive, and funds were set aside by the Peace Corps to establish a program in Georgia in 2000.
  
In the following lists, items marked with an asterisk are difficult to find or very expensive to buy in Tanzania or are of poor quality.
 
  
* One or two pairs of comfortable jeans or khakis (especially important for environment Volunteers who should bring three)
+
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles==
* Sleepwear
+
* Two sweaters, fleece tops, or warm jackets and a stocking cap (some places in the southern highlands get cold in June and July)
+
* Hat and sunglasses
+
* Swimsuit
+
* One or two long-sleeved T-shirts
+
* Windbreaker or rain jacket*
+
  
Note: If you have a specific brand you like or a unique piece of clothing or size that is hard to find, bring enough of that item for two years (e.g., size 13 shoes or sports bras are impossible to find).
+
''Main article: [[Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles in Georgia]]''
  
===For Women ===
+
Volunteers need to be very flexible about their housing expectations. Volunteers live in a variety of situations, including private rooms, shared houses, and small apartments.
  
* Three to five cotton or polyester dresses or skirts (below the knee or longer); these are required for training 2 Peace coRPS 
+
For the first three months of your service, you are required to live with a Georgian host family. After the first three months, alternative housing arrangements may be considered in consultation with your program manager and the medical officer. For reasons of safety and security and for reasons of quality of life (especially during the winter months), most Volunteers opt to remain living with homestay families throughout their two years of service. In most areas of Georgia there are no guarantees of continuous electricity, running water, or phone service. Some villages and towns have only a few hours of electricity a day (or even none at all) in the winter months, and the natural gas supply is often cut off for periods of time. Without a central heating system, the inside of buildings is often colder in the winter than the outdoors. You should be prepared to tolerate cold and discomfort, especially during the work day at school. The Peace Corps staff will do its best to help Volunteers adjust and succeed in this environment. Peace Corps/Georgia provides all Volunteers with sleeping bags for the winter. These sleeping bags have a synthetic filling and are rated at 0°F for warmth.
* Two or three blouses or dressy shirts (no bare shoulders)
+
* One extra-nice dress for official functions (e.g., swearing-in ceremony)
+
* Socks* (Tanzanian women generally do not wear pantyhose)  
+
* Two-year supply of underwear* (women must wear bras and slips)
+
* One pair of lightweight, quick-drying ankle pants for travel and when riding a bike or exercising
+
* Five or six short-sleeved T-shirts
+
  
===For Men ===
+
==Training==
  
* Three-to-five cotton or synthetic, dark-colored dress or casual pants
+
''Main article: [[Training in Georgia]]''
* Six or seven button-down shirts (mix of short and long sleeved)
+
* Two-year supply of underwear* and socks*
+
* Three short-sleeved T-shirts
+
* Two pairs of lightweight, quick-drying pants for travel, bike riding, and exercise
+
* One jacket and tie for official functions
+
* One or two pairs of shorts
+
  
===Shoes ===
+
Following a pre-departure orientation (staging) in the United States, you will participate in a 10-week, intensive pre-service training in Georgia. Peace Corps/Georgia uses a community-based training model that is designed around real life experiences and emphasizes community involvement. Trainees live with host families in one of several training villages around a central training facility outside the capital.
  
* Two pairs of nice but comfortable shoes (to wear with professional clothes)
+
The goals of community-based training are:
* Durable walking shoes or hiking boots*
+
* Sandals, e.g., Teva* brand or chacos* brand. Strongly recommended (a must for environment Volunteers)
+
* One pair of sneakers or running shoes
+
* Closed-toe shoes or dressy sandals
+
  
 +
# To provide in-depth, experiential learning in settings similar to those at Volunteer sites;
 +
# To give trainees the best possible opportunity to gain competence in technical, cross-cultural, language, and health and safety areas in a culturally and linguistically appropriate context;
 +
# To allow trainees to acquire experience and skills in self-directing their own learning so they can continue independent learning at site.
  
Note: hiking boots are only necessary if you’re going to be doing a lot of mountain climbing. Even then, fairly high-quality used boots are available in-country. Your best bet may be to buy a decent pair of tennis shoes which will be more than adequate 99 percent of the time. Also, flip-flops are available in abundance; don’t bring any!
+
Pre-service training contains five main components: technical, language, cross-cultural, health, and safety.  
  
===Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items ===
 
  
Most toiletries are readily available in Tanzania, but you may not find your favorite brand. You will not find good-quality hairbrushes or toothbrushes, and certain items will be comparatively expensive. If tampons (Tampax) are not available near your site, they will be supplied by the Peace Corps medical officer, so you do not need to bring them. Some Volunteers have highly recommended the new anti-bacterial lotion that you can just rub on your hands.
+
==Your Health Care and Safety==
  
===Kitchen ===
+
''Main article: [[Health Care and Safety in Georgia]]''
  
Most household items are readily available but may not be of the best quality. If you like to cook, consider bringing some of the following items.  
+
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative approach to disease. Peace Corps/Georgia maintains a clinic with a full-time medical officer who takes care of Volunteers’ primary health-care needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are also available in Georgia at local, American-standard clinics. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported to either an American medical facility in the region or to the United States.
  
* Plastic ziploc storage bags of various sizes (a must to keep out unwanted crawling critters)*
 
* Multipurpose cookbook* (Fannie Farmer is a favorite of Volunteers
 
* Good kitchen knife*
 
* Measuring cups and spoons
 
* Mexican or your favorite, unique spices* (most other spices are available especially Italian and Indian spices)
 
* Various powdered mixes (e.g., soft-drink mixes, salad dressings, soups, and sauce packets) 4
 
  
 +
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
  
===Entertainment ===
+
''Main article: [[Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues in Georgia]]''
  
Volunteers often have downtime, so bringing some of the items suggested below can make a difference. But remember that most rural areas do not have electricity. Consider bringing a good supply of batteries, including solar-powered batteries or rechargeable batteries and a charger. Please note that in Tanzania the electricity that is used is 210V.  
+
In Georgia, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyles, background, and beliefs will be judged in a cultural context very different from our own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in some host countries.
  
* Tape player or Walkman with small speakers and tapes (prerecorded and blank); for those without electricity, a Walkman uses fewer batteries than a large tape player
+
Outside of Georgia’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What is advertised as “typical” cultural behavior or norms may also be a narrow and selective interpretation, such as the perception in some countries that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Georgia are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to differences that you present.  
* Shortwave radio
+
* Camera and film
+
* Binoculars
+
* Musical instruments (plus extra strings, reeds, etc.)
+
* Sport, hobby, and art equipment and supplies
+
* Games (e.g., cards, dice, hacky sack, yo-yos, Frisbee, juggling balls, dominoes)
+
* Camping gear (tent, backpack, sleeping pad, etc.), if you are interested in camping
+
* Books
+
  
===Miscellaneous ===
+
* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
 +
* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
 +
* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
 +
* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
 +
* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
 +
* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
  
* A small current converter (if you bring small appliances like a shaver, etc.)
 
* One set of sheets with pillowcase
 
* English dictionary and/or thesaurus
 
* Multi-purpose knife (e.g., Swiss Army knife, Leatherman or Gerber; a must for environment Volunteers)
 
* Flashlight/headlamp and batteries (Note that AAA batteries are hard to come by 5
 
* A small amount of seeds to plant, especially herbs for the garden
 
* A solar battery charger and rechargeable batteries
 
*      Solar bulbs or/and solar power panels. With a power panel you can charge your cell or any other low-voltage USB-port devices, such as IPod, Kindle, etc. All you need is sun, and that's plentiful. You may want to check the Nokero and Solio products. Peace Corps Volunteers get a 25%-50% discount on Nokero products when they join [http://www.marketforchange.com Market for Change]
 
* Combination padlocks of various sizes (good key locks can be found in-country)
 
* Sewing kit
 
* Photos of your home and family (your neighbors will love them)
 
* Sturdy water bottle (e.g., Nalgene)
 
* Plastic egg carrier
 
* Money belt (critical for traveling on public transport)
 
* Travel alarm clock
 
* Shoe waterproofing kit
 
* Duct or packing tape
 
* Day pack
 
* Journal or diary
 
* U.S. stamps (to send mail with people returning home)
 
* Traveler’s checks for vacation travel
 
* For education Volunteers, a couple of high-quality secondary-level textbooks (Peace Corps/Tanzania has a resource library, and you will get some books in training for basic needs, but we suggest that you leave some items with friends or family to send you after you have moved to your site)
 
  
Special Considerations for Environmental Volunteers
 
  
Women: Cut back on the number of skirts you bring. And remember that loose-fitting skirts are best because you will be jumping gullies and riding bikes in them. Cut back on blouses, too. Substitute one pair of pants with a pair of Capri pants.
+
==Frequently Asked questions==
  
Men: Cut back on the number of pants. At most, bring three button-down shirts.  
+
{{Volunteersurvey2008
 +
|H1r=  36
 +
|H1s=  72.3
 +
|H2r=  28
 +
|H2s=  85.1
 +
|H3r=  23
 +
|H3s=  86.8
 +
|H4r=  34
 +
|H4s=  105
 +
|H5r=  13
 +
|H5s=  58.3
 +
|H6r=  20
 +
|H6s=  91.9
 +
}}
  
[[Category:Tanzania]]
+
''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Georgia]]''
 +
 
 +
* How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Georgia?
 +
* What is the electric current in Georgia?
 +
* How much money should I bring?
 +
* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
 +
* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
 +
* Do I need an international driver’s license?
 +
* What should I bring as gifts for Georgia friends and my host family?
 +
* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
 +
* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
 +
* Can I call home from Georgia?
 +
* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
 +
* Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?
 +
 
 +
 
 +
==Packing List==
 +
 
 +
''Main article: [[Packing List for Georgia]]''
 +
 
 +
This list has been compiled with the assistance of Volunteers serving in Georgia. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have a 100 pound weight restriction on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Georgia.
 +
 
 +
* General Clothing
 +
* Women
 +
* Men
 +
* Miscellaneous
 +
 
 +
==Peace Corps News==
 +
 
 +
Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
 +
 
 +
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22georgia%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
 +
 
 +
<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/gg/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
 +
 
 +
==See also==
 +
* Peace Corps Georgia Pre-Departure Guide https://sites.google.com/site/g14althandbook/
 +
* [[Volunteers who served in Georgia]]
 +
* [[Inspector General Reports]]
 +
* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
 +
* [[List of resources for Georgia]]
 +
 
 +
==External links==
 +
* [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/gg.html Peace Corps Journals - Georgia]
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Georgia]] [[Category:Eastern Europe and Central Asia]]
 +
[[Category:Country]]

Latest revision as of 05:14, 4 August 2014

The first Peace Corps Volunteers arrived in March 2001. They serve in rural communities and towns throughout the country, where they focus on offering and enhancing English education for Georgian students and teaching methodologies for Georgian teachers. Technical sectors in Georgia include education and non-governmental organization development.


Peace Corps History[edit]

Main article: History of the Peace Corps in Georgia

As early as 1994, the government of Georgia indicated its desire to host Peace Corps Volunteers. Although the Peace Corps sent an assessment team to Georgia in response to that request, a decision to enter Georgia was indefinitely postponed due to security concerns over civil unrest in the Abkhazia and Ossetia provinces. In 1997, the Georgian government formally reiterated its desire to host Peace Corps Volunteers, and again an assessment team was sent. Although the security situation had significantly improved by this time, budgetary constraints prevented the Peace Corps from acting upon this request, and the decision was delayed yet again. In late 1999, after repeated inquiries from the Georgian government and consistent accounts from the U.S. Embassy in Tbilisi that the security situation remained conducive to the presence of Peace Corps Volunteers, the decision was made to reassess the possibility of setting up a program. The review was positive, and funds were set aside by the Peace Corps to establish a program in Georgia in 2000.


Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles[edit]

Main article: Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles in Georgia

Volunteers need to be very flexible about their housing expectations. Volunteers live in a variety of situations, including private rooms, shared houses, and small apartments.

For the first three months of your service, you are required to live with a Georgian host family. After the first three months, alternative housing arrangements may be considered in consultation with your program manager and the medical officer. For reasons of safety and security and for reasons of quality of life (especially during the winter months), most Volunteers opt to remain living with homestay families throughout their two years of service. In most areas of Georgia there are no guarantees of continuous electricity, running water, or phone service. Some villages and towns have only a few hours of electricity a day (or even none at all) in the winter months, and the natural gas supply is often cut off for periods of time. Without a central heating system, the inside of buildings is often colder in the winter than the outdoors. You should be prepared to tolerate cold and discomfort, especially during the work day at school. The Peace Corps staff will do its best to help Volunteers adjust and succeed in this environment. Peace Corps/Georgia provides all Volunteers with sleeping bags for the winter. These sleeping bags have a synthetic filling and are rated at 0°F for warmth.

Training[edit]

Main article: Training in Georgia

Following a pre-departure orientation (staging) in the United States, you will participate in a 10-week, intensive pre-service training in Georgia. Peace Corps/Georgia uses a community-based training model that is designed around real life experiences and emphasizes community involvement. Trainees live with host families in one of several training villages around a central training facility outside the capital.

The goals of community-based training are:

  1. To provide in-depth, experiential learning in settings similar to those at Volunteer sites;
  2. To give trainees the best possible opportunity to gain competence in technical, cross-cultural, language, and health and safety areas in a culturally and linguistically appropriate context;
  3. To allow trainees to acquire experience and skills in self-directing their own learning so they can continue independent learning at site.

Pre-service training contains five main components: technical, language, cross-cultural, health, and safety.


Your Health Care and Safety[edit]

Main article: Health Care and Safety in Georgia

The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative approach to disease. Peace Corps/Georgia maintains a clinic with a full-time medical officer who takes care of Volunteers’ primary health-care needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are also available in Georgia at local, American-standard clinics. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported to either an American medical facility in the region or to the United States.


Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues[edit]

Main article: Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues in Georgia

In Georgia, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyles, background, and beliefs will be judged in a cultural context very different from our own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in some host countries.

Outside of Georgia’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What is advertised as “typical” cultural behavior or norms may also be a narrow and selective interpretation, such as the perception in some countries that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Georgia are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to differences that you present.

  • Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
  • Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
  • Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities


Frequently Asked questions[edit]

Georgia
2008 Volunteer Survey Results

How personally rewarding is your overall Peace Corps service?|}} Rank:
2008 H1r::36|}}
Score:
2008 H1s::72.3|}}
Today would you make the same decision to join the Peace Corps?|}} Rank:
2008 H2r::28|}}
Score:
2008 H2s::85.1|}}
Would you recommend Peace Corps service to others you think are qualified?|}} Rank:
2008 H3r::23|}}
Score:
2008 H3s::86.8|}}
Do you intend to complete your Peace Corps service?|}} Rank:
2008 H4r::34|}}
Score:
2008 H4s::105|}}
How well do your Peace Corps experiences match the expectations you had before you became a Volunteer?|}} Rank:
2008 H5r::13|}}
Score:
2008 H5s::58.3|}}
Would your host country benefit the most if the Peace Corps program were---?|}} Rank:
2008 H6r::20|}}
Score:
2008 H6s::91.9|}}
2008BVS::Georgia


Main article: FAQs about Peace Corps in Georgia

  • How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Georgia?
  • What is the electric current in Georgia?
  • How much money should I bring?
  • When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
  • Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
  • Do I need an international driver’s license?
  • What should I bring as gifts for Georgia friends and my host family?
  • Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
  • How can my family contact me in an emergency?
  • Can I call home from Georgia?
  • Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
  • Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?


Packing List[edit]

Main article: Packing List for Georgia

This list has been compiled with the assistance of Volunteers serving in Georgia. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have a 100 pound weight restriction on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Georgia.

  • General Clothing
  • Women
  • Men
  • Miscellaneous

Peace Corps News[edit]

Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by country of service or your home state

The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.
<rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22georgia%22&output=rss%7Ccharset=UTF-8%7Cshort%7Cdate=M d</rss>


PEACE CORPS JOURNALS
( As of Tuesday September 2, 2014 )<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/gg/blog/50.xml%7Ccharset=UTF-8%7Cshort%7Cmax=10</rss>

See also[edit]

External links[edit]