Difference between pages "Jermuk" and "Training in China"

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|site= Jermuk
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Your first weeks in-country will be an intense period of transition. It may be your first time outside of the United States. Regardless of your background and experience, you will be making a leap of faith and putting yourself in the hands of several individuals whose job is to prepare you for Peace Corps service. During pre-service training, all trainees live with host families. Many individuals find this experience to be the best part of their training. Host families provide invaluable lessons in cross-cultural and language areas that Peace Corps staff cannot begin to teach. Some Volunteers remain close to their host families throughout their service and spend some Chinese holidays and vacations with them.
|country= Armenia
 
|region= Vayots Dzor
 
|Year site was established= 1996?
 
|Total Volunteers= 7
 
|Number of NGOs= ?
 
|map= yes
 
|wikipedia=yes
 
|sitebar= yes
 
}}
 
  
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Pre-service training is designed to provide you with the tools necessary to operate independently and effectively as a Peace Corps Volunteer in China. You will participate in a structured learning situation that is community based. You will be required to attend all training sessions, learn and demonstrate proficiency in the language, and observe cultural mores. Your progress will be assessed by others, but you will also be asked to take responsibility for your own learning and to gradually decrease your reliance on the Peace Corps training and office staff. You will be encouraged to assess your own progress as well as your commitment to serving in Peace Corps/China for the next two years.
  
Jermuk Ջերմուկ is an in one of the most beautiful places in Armenia. Volcanic ridges rise from the desert into rolling high plateaus and meadow lands punctuated by deep canyons and gullies.
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A trainee-asssessment process helps the staff monitor trainee progress in meeting the required competencies in the areas of language, cross culture, technical, safety and security.  
  
The following is an enthusiast tour of my new hometown Jermuk. Things are going to change dramatically for the town and it’s people in the next few years due to economic prosperity and new wealth. Included are my sincere remarks about my opinions on Armenian development and where I think the town is going.  
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Likewise, trainees have the opportunity to assess their own performance and meet periodically with staff to discuss their progress in meeting the competencies. Towards the end of PST, trainees meet with senior staff to discuss their commitment to service before they are sworn-in.  
  
It’s hard to say where in the US or world it compares too, maybe Taos in New Mexico.  
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Pre-service training consists of language instruction; cross-cultural orientation; job-specific technical training; orientation to China’s institutional processes; health, medical, and safety orientation; and orientation to Peace Corps policies. The particular design of the training depends on the size and makeup of your group. PST will not give you everything it takes to be a successful Peace Corps Volunteer. Volunteer service is a process and requires continual learning and application of what is learned. Even though pre-service training is a good foundation, what you bring in terms of knowledge, skills, experience, and motivation, combined with what you acquire during PST, will determine the quality of your experience as a Volunteer.  
If its redevelopment is successful it should become world-class resort it was planned to be by Soviet designers.  
 
  
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====Technical Training====
  
== Highlights ==
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Technical training will prepare you to work in China by building on the skills you already have and by helping you to develop new skills in a manner appropriate to the needs and issues of the country. The Peace Corps staff and current Volunteers will conduct the technical component of the training program. Technical training places great emphasis on learning how to become an effective TEFL teacher in a Chinese classroom setting. The core of technical training is a three-week model school practicum with Chinese students.  Former Volunteers have said this is the hardest yet most rewarding experience of technical training.
*High: over 2000 meters or over 6,500 feet
 
*Weather: bright clear; beautiful especially during the summer season; dry wind from the desert
 
*Trees: Beautiful color change during the fall
 
*Wildlife: birds, deer, bears, and fish 
 
*Landscape: Rolling mountains and meadows with deep volcanic canyons with rushing streams
 
*Arts: Art museum and many active artists and craftsman
 
*Sports: Opportunities for Skiing, biking, hiking, fishing and any other mountain sports
 
*Relaxation: healthful hot spring water, a beautiful forested park and ponds; many hotels and health spas
 
*Unpopulated: the areas around Jermuk specially the to the northwest and southeast are the least populated large areas in all Armenia and Gharabagh. With a seasonal herds and small mountain hamlets
 
  
== Jermuk Potential and Current Projects and Community Analysis ==
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You will be supported and evaluated by experienced Chinese trainers, current Volunteers, and Peace Corps staff throughout the training to build the confidence and skills you will need to undertake your work as a TEFL teacher and be a productive member of your community.
Primary Projects to meet the Goals of Peace Corps
 
Secondary Projects that also meet Goals of Peace Corps
 
Personal Projects: I am interested is this project and believe there is Potential Peace Corps Support
 
  
===I. Environmental Landscape===
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====Language Training====
  
Right Bank City Park Project:
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As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that well-developed language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills will often be critical to your job performance, they will help you integrate into your host community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings. Therefore, language training is the heart of the training program, and you must successfully meet minimum language requirements to become a VolunteerExperienced Chinese language culture facilitators (LCFs) provide formal language instruction in small classes of two to five trainees. The Chinese language is also integrated in the health, safety, culture, and technical components of training.  
*Use Red Cross volunteers to help cleanup the trails
 
*Plant to circular flowerbeds, during the soviet times these drew people to the park.
 
*Repair steps and walkways? More of a construction project.   
 
*Lighting? Does the park need to be lit? Currently all that remains are old Soviet lampposts.
 
*Seating needs repairs. Finding or designing new seating, example: recycled plastic seats.
 
*Keeping the park generally in its current layout, few kiosks mostly by the main road and no new major development in the park.
 
*Pipes, pipes everywhere. Water pipes, gas pipes just lay across the paths. I just witnessed another gas line installed next to the scenic path around the lake: 11/13/2004. Parts of paths remain half excavated.
 
*Funded by Armenian Forests NGO and city government
 
  
*Left Bank Community Park Project: (Projected, next year?)
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Your language training will incorporate a competency-based approach. You will have classroom time and will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family to learn the language. Our goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so that you can practice and develop linguistic skills more thoroughly.  Furthermore, you will be provided guidelines on how to effectively design, implement, and monitor an individualized learning program as well as how to identify a suitable tutor and negotiate a reasonable rate during your two years of service. This policy attempts to provide the maximum possible flexibility to Volunteers to determine how to best meet their language needs.
*Designed to provide green and open space for people in Left Bank
 
*Foster new ideas about public open space in Armenia especially in the apartment complexes so common in most cities.
 
*Trees provide protection from wind
 
*Education for children
 
*Not sure about final location
 
  
*Proposed AutoCAD Classes
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====Cross-Cultural Training ====
*Living with City Architect
 
*Helped on some small projects
 
*Currently no computers in architect’s office
 
  
Road and Bridge Reconstruction (now, not actively involved)
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As part of your pre-service training, you will live with a Chinese host family. The experience of living with a Chinese host family is designed to ease your transition into life in the countryside. Families have gone through an orientation conducted by Peace Corps staff to explain the purpose of the pre-service training program and to assist them in helping you adapt to living in China. Many Volunteers form strong and lasting friendships with their host families.  
*The first phase of Road construction will be completed this fall.
 
*This includes the main roads to Jermuk from the valley and in the city.  
 
*The main bridge has been repainted and refurbished
 
*Most of right bank sidewalks have been reconstructed and paved
 
*Next year work will continue on the minor roads to access surrounding communities. 
 
*Traffic signals remain out of service and many lighting fixtures need to be upgraded.
 
  
Hotel Restoration Development and Water Gallery Restoration (now, not actively involved)
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Cross-culture and community entry will be covered to help improve your skills of perception, communication, and facilitation. Community mobilization, conflict resolution, gender and development, and traditional and political structures are some examples of the topics that will be covered.  
*The Hotel Armenia is the first post soviet destination hotel in Jermuk.
 
*Formerly the polyclinic for the right bank and the center for any health related therpoly.  
 
*Redesigned as a luxury spa comparable to any in Western Europe or the US funded by owner of Jermuk Group and former mayor. 
 
*Its restoration was partnered with Jermuk’s most famous architectural landmark the Water Gallery.
 
*All the paving stones were replaced and the building generally cleaned however I don’t believe that there were any significant improvements in piping and structure. It was cosmetic work, as most of the work around Jermuk and Armenia appears to be.
 
  
===II. Health and Environmental Education and Improvement===
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====Health Training ====
  
*Public Restroom Facilities
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During pre-service training, you will be given basic health training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive health care and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in China. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living compound, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are also covered.  
*During Soviet times there were three public restroom facilities in Jermuk
 
*Current there are none, people coming to the town and currently use the city park and its bushes as a toilet.
 
*There is talk about putting the former Water Gallery restroom back in commission, but there is little unified support between the business interests in town and the city government, everyone claims not to have the funds.
 
*Maybe this a candidate for composing toilets
 
  
*New Polyclinic or Hospital
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====Safety Training====
*Old building located near Ketchup was to big
 
*New building smaller and located in left bank was constructed using private funds?
 
*Part of the kindergarten planned as a place for older people.
 
*Mission East interested?
 
  
Reforestation
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During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces risk in your home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service. There will be extensive training in the Peace Corps/China emergency action plan to familiarize you with procedures during any emergency.
*Tree Coppicing, with Armenian Forests NGO
 
*School education?
 
  
GIS and Park/Natural Reserve Establishment
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Additional Trainings During Volunteer Service
*Analysis of resources in Jermuk and Arpa river valley
 
*Some type of management of forests would be positive
 
  
Trash Collection and Containers
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In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides trainees and Volunteers with continual opportunities to examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During your service, there are usually three training events. The titles and objectives for those trainings are as follows:
*Aluminum Boxes were stolen in the post Soviet years
 
*No collection methods currently
 
  
Trash Management and Landfills
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* In-service training: Provides an opportunity for Volunteers to upgrade their technical, language, and project development skills while sharing their experiences and reaffirming their commitment after having served for three to six months.
*Two major dumps in Jermuk
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* Mid-service conference (done in conjunction with technical sector in-service): Assists Volunteers in reviewing their first year, reassessing their personal and project objectives, and planning for their second year of service.
*Neither one is sanitary
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* Close-of-service conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service and reviews their respective projects and personal experiences.
  
Water Management
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The number, length, and design of these trainings are adapted to country-specific needs and conditions. The key to the training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through the end of your service; and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.
*Metering
 
*Running sinks and toilets
 
*Bathroom satiation
 
*Waste water outlets
 
  
Jermuk Branch of the Armenian Red Cross: (open since 2000)
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[[Category:China]]
*It provides extracurricular activities for children and adults.
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[[Category:Training|China]]
*Main goals: First Aid education and environmental education as well as outdoor recreation Examples: helping plant trees with the Armenian Forests, and getting cloth bags as an option in stores around Jermuk.
 
*Write several grants, example: Eurasia Foundation, to update the offices and pay the rent.
 
*Meet with Yerevan office to see what types of profit generation activities are expectable, to support the office
 
*Get a calendar of activities planned throughout the year.
 
*Recreation: another idea for profit generating activity for Jermuk Branch of the Armenian Red Cross
 
 
 
 
 
===III. Tourism and Business Development===
 
 
 
Simple Paper map of Downtown Jermuk: (in progress)
 
*Help me familiarize myself with where I live
 
*Showing general layout and important places for hotel guests and visitors
 
*The Hotel Armenia management requested it.
 
*Potential areas for investment around the city, open space?
 
*In digital format for ease of editing, it can be refined and reused. For security reasons I am working with poor source material
 
 
 
Informational Pamphlet (s):(next year)
 
*One of the goals of the urban institute’s tourism and business center
 
*Two employees are being paid to collect information on Jermuk
 
*The pamphlet(s) will have information on
 
*Businesses: Hotels health spas, restaurants, taxis, stores, and shops. 
 
*Culture: art museum and local churches, fortresses, and archeological sites
 
*Natural wonders: waterfalls, walking trails…
 
*Published in various languages, mainly Armenian, English and Russian, and later Spanish, French, German.
 
*I suggest the first versions be Xerox copies, to keep costs down and work out details
 
*Some information has already been collected by the Armenia Tourist Information Center in Yerevan, and is already in English.
 
 
 
Tourist/Business Center: (now open)
 
This is an important part of the Urban Institute’s plans to develop the city into a modern tourist destination.
 
*Temporary facility in the municipal building to test sustainability over the next two years
 
*I learned from the mayor that the town and region is funding most new projects with it’s own funds.
 
*Staff paid by city staff
 
*Promote small and medium business development and investment in Jermuk
 
*Education center on business management and finance
 
*There is potential for Yerevan based businesses to establish a branch in Jermuk, I recently spoke with an American jeweler that was very interested in the idea.
 
*Modeled on the successful centers in Sisian and other towns in Armenia that Peace Corps volunteers are working with.
 
 
 
“Public” Forum and Business Interest Meetings (on going?)
 
*Like a city council
 
*Supposed to be open to the public but only attended by business interests continuing the legacy of Soviet totalitarian control over people
 
*No posted schedule?
 
 
 
Souvenir Development: idea for profit generating activity for Jermuk Branch of the Armenian Red Cross
 
*Caps, T-shirts, and other clothing with Jermuk on it.
 
*Postcards and posters
 
*Local crafts: Wood crafts and cut stone. Carpets made a local carpet factory. A mini Vernissage in the mountains.
 
*Local produce: honey and herbs
 
*Agricultural Products from region, such as goat cheese from USDA Yerginotizor Arid Goat center. The marketing department of the USDA Yerevan office is also working on selling the cheese generated at the center in the local town, Yerevan, and overseas. They contracted with a local pottery works to make several sizes of small clay urns to store the cheese in. They are decorated with a primitive goat motif and sealed with a wax plug. I was thinking they could sell some to tourists in Jermuk during the tourist season. Try: www.usda.am
 
*Book stand: hiking guide, wildflower guide, tourist info, and regional info
 
*A model of the hot water gallery made of tuff stone and sold one of the hotels.
 
 
 
Sanatoriums
 
*Marketing, what cliental
 
*Organization, still based on outdated Soviet type business plans
 
*Refurnishing
 
 
 
Water bottling Factories
 
*Three or four maybe more factories
 
*The main source of year round employment for population
 
*Tours maybe possible
 
 
 
Carpet Factory in Left Bank
 
*Handwork all done by women
 
*Around $150 a square foot
 
 
 
Transportation
 
*Taxis, buses, and vans
 
*Buses are all Soviet era and chance it every time the climb the hill from Vike to Jermuk
 
*Vans are Russian and only have one a day except during summer, must call ahead to buy tickets
 
 
 
Movie Theaters and Auditoriums
 
*Several Auditoriums in Jermuk
 
*Unused and in poor condition
 
 
 
Airport and Runway
 
*Built by Soviets
 
*Two kilometers
 
 
 
Fish Farm
 
*on the Arpa River.
 
*A guy who runs it and charges about 8 dollars a kilogram of a fish that looks like rainbow trout.
 
*The farm is up the valley from the town,
 
*during Soviet times it was large operation with twenty or thirty pools around 4x20 meters each, with a small lake.
 
*Currently only one of the pools has fish and only about five or six of the pool look operational.
 
 
 
Art Galleries
 
*One Soviet era art collection or “museum”
 
*Not economically viable
 
*Permanent collection vs. Retail
 
 
 
Proposed Armenian Folk Life Center
 
*A cultural center
 
*Traditional music and building…like colonial Williamsburg
 
*A school for foreigners to learn the traditional Armenian arts, painting miniatures, carving kharcars, making jewelry, painting.
 
*Similar one in Vike
 
 
 
Agricultural Technologies
 
*USDA MAP project
 
*Garden plots around apartments, are not zoned or monitored
 
*Gndevaz, local agricultural center produces much for Jermuk.
 
 
 
 
 
===IV. Recreational Development===
 
 
 
I have grouped different types of recreation into three groups based on environmental and economic impact.
 
 
 
*Low impact (recreational activities): the most successful require almost no info structure development. All that is needed is equipment for rental and general information about the best location to recreate in. Equipment: This can be bought or donated.
 
 
 
*Biking (spring, summer, fall), Ideal!!! Rolling hills and plateau. There are spectacular views from almost every location on the high land.  There are many Jeep trails to follow and few fences or farms.
 
Locations: 
 
Hills to the northwest of Jermuk offer great opportunities with their gentle yet undulating terrain.
 
 
 
*Snow shoeing and Cross-country skiing (winter) Heavy snow fall in the area makes it ideal for winter trekking.
 
*Hiking and Camping (all seasons) In the areas to the north and south of Jermuk there is beautiful undeveloped wilderness. The only people who frequent the area are summer herders. There are good water sources along streams. In canyons and ravines there are many potential protected campsites. With such up obstructed views it is hard to miss the many species of wildlife and plant life.
 
*Kite boarding on snow and water (all seasons) I think this will work well on snow in the winter. I am not sure about contamination level of the reservoir to be able to swim in it.
 
 
 
Moderate impact: require a more development and would probably have to be run by businesses, if individuals didn’t have gear. May need to be regulated.
 
*Sports shooting (all seasons) Graws and pheasant are numerous. Wild pigs are also common
 
*Horseback riding (summer tourist season) Examples of rides: Down the Arpa valley from Gndevaz village to visit the Vak. Up to the high plateau to visit the hot springs distinct from the town.
 
*Paragliding (year round) a hot dry wind generally blows up the Arpa valley from the desert daily. There are several almost treeless hills that rise abruptly around five hundred feet next an old two kilometer aircraft landing strip.
 
*Kayaking and rafting (tourist season) I haven’t thoroughly scouted the Arpa River but it appears that the river is quite boulder choked and therefore would be only runnable but expert kayakers. The wastewater from the whole town of Jermuk enters directly into the river. Beyond the dam new construction of a pipeline on the old Jermuk road has caused the river to be filled with scree causing serious blockage and visual destruction. In places it no longer looks like a river canyon but gravel piles.
 
*Bungee jumping (tourist season) The over to three hundred foot drop from this metal arch would make a compelling leap. I wonder if it has been tried in the Caucasus region before
 
 
 
High Impact: Heavy infrastructure development and investment, expensive equipment
 
*Downhill skiing, snowboarding (winter and spring) Huge investment and not sustainable unless community is dependent on it?
 
*SUV and Jeep trails (all year) Terribly destructive to the environment, especially alpine meadows
 
 
 
*1. Providing tourists with hiking/skiing information, if they have their own equipment
 
*2. Providing equipment and guides for tourists for a cost that would help support the red cross’s continued operation
 
 
 
Sport and Recreation Stores
 
Necessary?
 
 
 
=== V. Innovative Alternative Energy Technologies ===
 
 
 
*Current Situation: Unlike much of the rest of Armenia’s cities, the info structure for central heating generally remains. The pipes and radiators remain because the central heating stations recently shut down.
 
Gas Pipes,
 
*Electric Transmission Lines:
 
 
 
Micro Hydropower Option
 
*One station is operating currently
 
*Using old Soviet equipment with little or no safety practices
 
*These a really popular PC projects in mountainous developing countries.
 
*I saw several in Nepal that were powering villages, they are about the size of a washing machine or smaller.
 
 
 
Hydrothermal Option
 
*Has hydrothermal Power been explored?
 
*What investment does this require?
 
*Where has this been used successfully? Iceland ?
 
*They say the only solution to decentralizing the heating in Armenia is running natural gas to every house and apartment.
 
*This has created a mess of pipes running above ground everywhere in Armenia. The Armenians don’t like to bury any of there utilities outside of central Yerevan.
 
 
 
 
 
Solar power
 
*Roofs of building??
 
*Intense UV in and a lot of sunny days
 
 
 
Energy Management Practices
 
*Thermal Curtains and other insulation
 
 
 
=== VI. Funding Sourcing ===
 
 
 
*National Government:
 
*Municipal Government: Selling most of town property to private investors
 
*International NGOs
 
*Diaspora Community Members
 
*Community donations
 
 
 
*Glendale and Washington DC
 
As you know there is a huge Armenian population in Glendale, LA, over a million, many first generation. I was thinking about sending several flyers out to my uncle to put up in various health spas, gyms, and sports equipment shops. Armenian Americans could donate their old equipment to the Peace Corps to help Jermuk, the primer outdoor destination in Armenia.
 
 
 
Jeffery, Armenian Forests, gets a lot of donations shipped over through a Diaspora organization in Yerevan that specializes in shipping donated items. I will learn more about it. I will come up with a draft of a flyer and maybe a PowerPoint explaining what Jermuk is.
 
 
 
==Etymology==
 
“Jer” in Armenian means a spring
 
 
 
==Presence of NGOs==
 
 
 
=== Jermuk Branch of the Armenian Red Cross: ===
 
 
 
1. Extracurricular activities for children and adults, First Aid education, outdoor recreation and environmental education. Examples: helping plant trees with the Armenian Forests, and getting cloth bags as an option in stores around Jermuk.
 
 
 
2. Write several grants, example: Eurasia Foundation, to update the offices and pay the rent.
 
 
 
3. Meet with Yerevan office to see what types of profit generation activities are expectable, to support the office
 
 
 
4. Get a calendar of activities planned throughout the year.
 
 
 
 
 
==Education==
 
 
 
===Schools===
 
*All Schools recently refurnished
 
*Right Bank school didn’t want a PC language teacher
 
*Left Bank school wants a PC business volunteer
 
*After school Language Club for advanced students
 
 
 
===Project Harmony===
 
*Past volunteers very active in work there
 
*In need of new camera
 
 
 
===Sports School===
 
*Former PC volunteer’s project
 
*Friendly director
 
 
 
Sports Fields
 
*Two sports fields in the Right Bank, dirt and not maintained
 
*One large one in Left Bank
 
 
 
Playground and Proposed Sports Center
 
*In Right Bank
 
*A sports center and casino are part of the next phase of development of the Hotel Armenia Project
 
 
 
Yoga Classes
 
*Proposed by a former PC volunteer
 
 
 
===Ecocamps===
 
*Seemly popular project for PC volunteers
 
*Proposed by past volunteers to be run by the Red Cross
 
 
 
==Transportation==
 
Thank god there is a new bus!!!!
 
 
 
===From Yerevan to Jermuk===
 
The nonstop marshooti service runs daily at 3pm, from the Kilka bus station, accessible by 77 and 68 and 101 Yerevan town marshooti. Be early as space is often hard to find.
 
*Bus Cost:  2,000 Dram
 
 
 
===From Sevan, Martuni, and Lake Region to Jermuk===
 
It maybe more cost effective to take a cab from the lake region down the Selim pass road from Martuni to Yeghegnadzor.
 
*About 8,000 Dram
 
 
 
===From Yeghegnadzor/Vike to Jermuk===
 
The bus to Jermuk runs daily from Yeghegnadzor 2pm Mon thru Sat and 4pm on Sunday. The bus trip takes approximately two hours in good conditions. Yeghegnadzor is about twenty minutes from Vike via Malishka
 
 
 
*Bus: Yeghegnadzor to Jermuk: 700 Dram
 
*Bus: Vike to Jermuk: 500 Dram
 
*Taxi from Vike to Jermuk: 4,000 to 6,000 Dram
 
 
 
==Accommodations==
 
 
 
=== Prices for rented apartments in Jermuk ===
 
*1 room: 8,000
 
*2 rooms: 12,000
 
*3 rooms: 20,000
 
 
 
==Weather==
 
 
 
 
 
==Past volunteers==
 
Elizabeth Vega<br>
 
'''1997-1999'''<br>
 
[[Patrick O'Neill]]<br>
 
'''1998-2000'''<br>
 
[[Nancy Reinhart]] <br>
 
'''2002'''<br>
 
[[Scott Guenthner]]<br>
 
'''2003'''<br>
 
'''2004'''<br>
 
[[Will Dickinson]]<br>
 
'''2005''<br>
 
no volunteers<br>
 
'''2006''<br>
 
no volunteers<br>
 
'''2007'''<br>
 
[[Ben Callaway]]<br>
 
 
 
==External links==
 
{{Invert-property|Located in|Name of community}}
 
*[http://www.jermuk.do.am/ All about jermuk]
 

Revision as of 03:26, 8 September 2009


Training in [[{{#explode:Training in China| |2}} {{#explode:Training in China| |3}} {{#explode:Training in China| |4}}]]
Pre-service training will probably be the most intense period of your Peace Corps service, as you will need to gain the knowledge and experience necessary to successfully serve as a Volunteer in just 10 weeks. While the training period will be extremely busy, it should also be a time of excitement, discovery, and self-fulfillment. The effort and challenges of adapting to a new culture will draw on your reserves of patience and humor but will be handsomely rewarded with a sense of belonging among new friends.
  • [[Packing list for {{#explode:Training in China| |2}} {{#explode:Training in China| |3}} {{#explode:Training in China| |4}}]]
  • [[Training in {{#explode:Training in China| |2}} {{#explode:Training in China| |3}} {{#explode:Training in China| |4}}]]
  • [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in {{#explode:Training in China| |2}} {{#explode:Training in China| |3}} {{#explode:Training in China| |4}}]]
  • [[Health care and safety in {{#explode:Training in China| |2}} {{#explode:Training in China| |3}} {{#explode:Training in China| |4}}]]
  • [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in {{#explode:Training in China| |2}} {{#explode:Training in China| |3}} {{#explode:Training in China| |4}}]]
  • [[FAQs about Peace Corps in {{#explode:Training in China| |2}} {{#explode:Training in China| |3}} {{#explode:Training in China| |4}}]]
  • [[History of the Peace Corps in {{#explode:Training in China| |2}} {{#explode:Training in China| |3}} {{#explode:Training in China| |4}}]]
|3}} [[Image:Flag_of_{{#explode:Training in China| |2}}.svg|50px|none]]}}

See also:
Pre-Departure Checklist
Staging Timeline

For information see Welcomebooks

[[Category: {{#explode:Training in China| |2}} {{#explode:Training in China| |3}} {{#explode:Training in China| |4}}]]

Your first weeks in-country will be an intense period of transition. It may be your first time outside of the United States. Regardless of your background and experience, you will be making a leap of faith and putting yourself in the hands of several individuals whose job is to prepare you for Peace Corps service. During pre-service training, all trainees live with host families. Many individuals find this experience to be the best part of their training. Host families provide invaluable lessons in cross-cultural and language areas that Peace Corps staff cannot begin to teach. Some Volunteers remain close to their host families throughout their service and spend some Chinese holidays and vacations with them.

Pre-service training is designed to provide you with the tools necessary to operate independently and effectively as a Peace Corps Volunteer in China. You will participate in a structured learning situation that is community based. You will be required to attend all training sessions, learn and demonstrate proficiency in the language, and observe cultural mores. Your progress will be assessed by others, but you will also be asked to take responsibility for your own learning and to gradually decrease your reliance on the Peace Corps training and office staff. You will be encouraged to assess your own progress as well as your commitment to serving in Peace Corps/China for the next two years.

A trainee-asssessment process helps the staff monitor trainee progress in meeting the required competencies in the areas of language, cross culture, technical, safety and security.

Likewise, trainees have the opportunity to assess their own performance and meet periodically with staff to discuss their progress in meeting the competencies. Towards the end of PST, trainees meet with senior staff to discuss their commitment to service before they are sworn-in.

Pre-service training consists of language instruction; cross-cultural orientation; job-specific technical training; orientation to China’s institutional processes; health, medical, and safety orientation; and orientation to Peace Corps policies. The particular design of the training depends on the size and makeup of your group. PST will not give you everything it takes to be a successful Peace Corps Volunteer. Volunteer service is a process and requires continual learning and application of what is learned. Even though pre-service training is a good foundation, what you bring in terms of knowledge, skills, experience, and motivation, combined with what you acquire during PST, will determine the quality of your experience as a Volunteer.

Technical Training

Technical training will prepare you to work in China by building on the skills you already have and by helping you to develop new skills in a manner appropriate to the needs and issues of the country. The Peace Corps staff and current Volunteers will conduct the technical component of the training program. Technical training places great emphasis on learning how to become an effective TEFL teacher in a Chinese classroom setting. The core of technical training is a three-week model school practicum with Chinese students. Former Volunteers have said this is the hardest yet most rewarding experience of technical training.

You will be supported and evaluated by experienced Chinese trainers, current Volunteers, and Peace Corps staff throughout the training to build the confidence and skills you will need to undertake your work as a TEFL teacher and be a productive member of your community.

Language Training

As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that well-developed language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills will often be critical to your job performance, they will help you integrate into your host community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings. Therefore, language training is the heart of the training program, and you must successfully meet minimum language requirements to become a Volunteer. Experienced Chinese language culture facilitators (LCFs) provide formal language instruction in small classes of two to five trainees. The Chinese language is also integrated in the health, safety, culture, and technical components of training.

Your language training will incorporate a competency-based approach. You will have classroom time and will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family to learn the language. Our goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so that you can practice and develop linguistic skills more thoroughly. Furthermore, you will be provided guidelines on how to effectively design, implement, and monitor an individualized learning program as well as how to identify a suitable tutor and negotiate a reasonable rate during your two years of service. This policy attempts to provide the maximum possible flexibility to Volunteers to determine how to best meet their language needs.

Cross-Cultural Training

As part of your pre-service training, you will live with a Chinese host family. The experience of living with a Chinese host family is designed to ease your transition into life in the countryside. Families have gone through an orientation conducted by Peace Corps staff to explain the purpose of the pre-service training program and to assist them in helping you adapt to living in China. Many Volunteers form strong and lasting friendships with their host families.

Cross-culture and community entry will be covered to help improve your skills of perception, communication, and facilitation. Community mobilization, conflict resolution, gender and development, and traditional and political structures are some examples of the topics that will be covered.

Health Training

During pre-service training, you will be given basic health training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive health care and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in China. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living compound, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are also covered.

Safety Training

During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces risk in your home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service. There will be extensive training in the Peace Corps/China emergency action plan to familiarize you with procedures during any emergency.

Additional Trainings During Volunteer Service

In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides trainees and Volunteers with continual opportunities to examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During your service, there are usually three training events. The titles and objectives for those trainings are as follows:

  • In-service training: Provides an opportunity for Volunteers to upgrade their technical, language, and project development skills while sharing their experiences and reaffirming their commitment after having served for three to six months.
  • Mid-service conference (done in conjunction with technical sector in-service): Assists Volunteers in reviewing their first year, reassessing their personal and project objectives, and planning for their second year of service.
  • Close-of-service conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service and reviews their respective projects and personal experiences.

The number, length, and design of these trainings are adapted to country-specific needs and conditions. The key to the training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through the end of your service; and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.