Difference between pages "Training in Armenia" and "Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington D.C."

From Peace Corps Wiki
(Difference between pages)
Jump to: navigation, search
m (1 revision)
 
m (1 revision)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
{{Training_by_country}}{{Countrybar
+
== About Us==
|Countryname= Armenia
+
}}
+
  
Pre-service training is approximately 10 weeks long. Training takes place six days a week and may include some evening sessions. Adequate time is allowed for leisure activities and outings with your host family. You will receive instruction in the Eastern Armenian language, cross-cultural adaptation skills, Armenian history and culture, personal safety awareness, technical skills related to your project, and medical topics. You will also receive important information about the administrative side of the Peace Corps as it relates to Volunteer allowances, responsibilities, and office policies.
+
“Bringing the Experience Home”
  
During training, you will live with an Armenian family in a village near the training site. This gives you the opportunity to practice your language skills and to develop <span class="plainlinks">[http://goo.gl/qkYud<span style="color:black;font-weight:normal; text-decoration:none!important;  background:none!important; text-decoration:none;">century 21 broker properti jual beli sewa rumah Indonesia</span>] cross-cultural understanding on a deeper level. Three meals a day will be provided by your host family. As mentioned earlier, host family accommodations vary depending on the community; regardless of the situation, you will live as the majority of the other members of your community.  
+
RPCV/W is a volunteer-run organization representing the sizable community of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers and friends who live and work in the DC metropolitan region. They undertake 3-4 events per month and focus on three primary activities.
  
During training, you will be evaluated on how well you adapt to the culture, learn the language, and interact with Armenians and on your degree of professionalism. The Peace Corps staff will make every effort to provide the support necessary to ensure your successful completion of training.  You must meet the minimum training requirements by the end of pre-service training to be sworn in as a Volunteer.  
+
* Holding social events such as happy hours, parties, field trips, and other fun, interest-based activities. Any member may start a club and utilize our network to organize it.
  
====Technical Training====
+
* Helping local nonprofits engaged in community development meet their needs for volunteer assistance by organizing regular service projects and partnering toward shared goals.
  
Technical training prepares you to work in Armenia by building on the skills you already have and by helping you develop new skills in a manner appropriate to the needs of the country. The Peace Corps staff, Armenian experts, and current Volunteers will conduct the training program. Training places great emphasis on learning how to transfer the skills you have to the community in which you will serve as a Volunteer.  
+
* Helping members advance their careers through structured professional development events and by establishing a vibrant, organized network of mentors in various industries.
  
Technical training will include sessions on the general economic and political environment in Armenia and strategies for working within such a framework. You will review your technical sector’s goals and will meet with the Armenian ministries and agencies that invited the Peace Corps to assist them.  
+
From time to time, they also engage in events of a symbolic or historic nature, such as marching in a parade or participating in a public ceremony. Membership is open to all who share a passion for community service, professional development, and international engagement.
  
====Language Training====
+
== 2012-2013 Mission Statement ==
  
As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are the key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. These skills are critical to your job <span class="plainlinks">[http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/Kenya<span style="color:black;font-weight:normal; text-decoration:none!important;  background:none!important; text-decoration:none;">century 21 broker properti jual beli sewa rumah Indonesia</span>] performance, they help you integrate into your host community, and they can ease your personal adaptation to the new surroundings.  Armenian language instructors teach formal language classes in small groups of four to five people. The Armenian language is also introduced in the health, cultural, and technical components of training.
 
  
Your language training will incorporate a community-based approach. In addition to classroom time, you will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family. The goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills so that you can practice and develop language skills further once you are at your site.  
+
"To serve as a resource to RPCVs and friends in the Washington DC area through social events, community service projects, and professional development programs that embody the 3rd Goal and spirit of the Peace Corps."
  
Prior to being sworn-in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies throughout your two years of service.  
+
The Mission Statement may be revised each year by the current Board of Directors.  
  
====Cross-Cultural Training====
+
== Primary Programs ==
  
The experience of living with an Armenian host family is designed to ease your transition to life at your site. Families go through an orientation conducted by Peace Corps staff to explain the purpose of pre-service training and to assist them in helping you adapt to living in Armenia. Many Volunteers form strong and lasting friendships with their host families.
 
  
Cross-cultural and community development training will help you improve your communication skills and understand your role as a facilitator of development. You will be exposed to topics such as appropriate ways to enter a community and establish productive relationships, gender and development, nonformal and adult education strategies, political structures, art, literature, and history.
+
In addition to organizing regular social events for members, RPCV/W divides its long-term programming into four areas:
  
====Health Training====
+
=== Community Service ===
  
During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive healthcare and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in Armenia. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living compound, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are also covered.
 
  
====Safety Training====
+
RPCV/W is committed to supporting local organizations engaged in community development in the DC area. Being all volunteers at heart, their members enjoy coming out on a weekend to assist with a worthy cause. Service events are organized by their Community Service Director. Local organizations are encouraged to submit calls for volunteers in their weekly newsletter.
  
During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces risks at home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.
+
=== Partnership for Peace ===
  
===Additional Trainings During Volunteer Service===
 
  
In its commitment to institutionalize quality training, the Peace Corps has implemented a training system that provides Volunteers with continual opportunities to examine their commitment to Peace Corps service while increasing their technical and cross-cultural skills. During your service, there are usually three training events. The titles and objectives for those trainings are as follows:
+
Each year, RPCV/W enters into a special relationship with a grassroots nonprofit that shares its goals and values. In addition to awarding them a cash grant based on the proceeds of their yearly fundraiser, they advertise their events and helps them organize volunteers for their activities. The Vice President is charged with coordinating and strengthening the PfP program. The process begins with a call for proposals, the Board selects the finalists, and group members vote for a winner during the end-of-year elections.
  
* In-Service Training: Provides an opportunity for Volunteers to upgrade their technical, language, and project development skills while sharing their experiences and reaffirming their commitment after having served for three to six months.
+
=== Professional Development ===
* Mid-Service Conference: Assists Volunteers in reviewing their first year, reassessing their personal and project objectives, and planning for their second year of service.
+
* Close-of-Service Conference: Prepares Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service and reviews their respective projects and personal experiences.  The number, length, and design of these trainings are adapted to country-specific needs and conditions. The key to the training system is that training events are integrated and interrelated, from the pre-departure orientation through the end of your service, and are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.
+
  
[[Category:Armenia]] [[Category:Training|Armenia]]
+
 
 +
RPCV/W strongly believes that all RPCVs should be encouraged to network freely, and urges its members to make time for their peers who are looking to climb the ladder. To this end, they host regular networking events and career panels. They also track various RPCV groups that exist within government agencies and large employers. This program is overseen by a Professional Development Director who acts as the organization's chief networker and job coach. Jobs are posted in RPCV/W's Linkedin Group and individual members often post opportunities in its Facebook Group.
 +
 
 +
=== Special Events ===
 +
 
 +
 
 +
RPCV/W is often called upon to plan and participate in major public events. In September of 2011, RPCV/W organized the 50th Anniversary of the Peace Corps commemoration at Arlington National Cemetery, which hosted over 5,000 participants and included a parade across the Memorial Bridge. Since 1984, they have gathered each year to lay flowers at the gravesite of John F. Kennedy. They have marched with Peace Corps in Presidential Inaugurations and are now participating in DC's LGBT Capitol Pride Parade.
 +
 
 +
== Other Services ==
 +
 
 +
 
 +
 
 +
=== Social Media===
 +
 
 +
 
 +
RPCV/W maintains a Facebook Group, Facebook Page, Twitter Feed, Linkedin Group, and a group on the NPCA Ning Network. It also maintains a robust website that allows members to interact with eachother, and a weekly newsletter that any member can utilize. With these tools, it is able to reach thousands of RPCVs and others.
 +
 
 +
The Facebook Group is a popular spot for new arrivals to introduce themselves and ask about housing or jobs. Members with property to lease naturally prefer RPCV tenants, and use the group as an alternative to Craigslist. Some use it to ask the group to recommend services, places to eat, and things to do. Members may fundraise and share their causes there. In short, it's an open forum which supplements our physical activities and keeps the network fresh.
 +
 
 +
The Linkedin Group is similar, but less outwardly active. Most of its use happens behind the scenes, as members search out peers to network for professional opportunities. The Twitter Feed and Facebook Page are controlled by the Public Relations Director, who is charged with keeping members informed and engaged.
 +
 
 +
===Innovation===
 +
 
 +
 
 +
Members of RPCV/W are closely involved in the Peace Corps Innovation Challenge, and the organization promotes innovative uses of technology to benefit serving PCVs and returned volunteers.
 +
 
 +
== History==
 +
 +
 
 +
RPCVs have been coming to DC since the Peace Corps was founded. Many were involved in the Peace Movement of the 1960s and there are several documented instances where RPCVs gathered to protest the war in southeast Asia. They found jobs in the civil and foreign service and set down roots. They began forming groups in the 1970’s, banding together for social solidarity and to support projects abroad. RPCV/W was formed in 1979 as an offshoot of the National Council of Returned Volunteers, which is now known as the National Peace Corps Association. RPCVs in DC banded together to do service projects, network, and commemorate special events such as Peace Corps anniversaries.  RPCV/W was formally incorporated as a 501c3 nonprofit organization in 1991. As the years passed, a diverse, multi-generational community of RPCVs came into being, with new members arriving every week.
 +
 
 +
There are an estimated 5,000 Returned Peace Corps Volunteers living in the Washington, DC Metro area. Over 1,000 are active, dues-paying members of RPCV/W.
 +
 
 +
According to a 2012 survey, most of RPCV/W's members join to network, make friends, and to become familiar with the DC Peace Corps Community. 83% attended at least one event throughout the year. 85% receive the weekly email newsletter. Most reported making friends, participating in events, and getting involved with local volunteer projects. Others reported getting jobs, finding mentors, and even meeting their significant other through the network.
 +
 
 +
The median age of RPCV/W's membership is 32, and over half possess an advanced degree. They work in international development and the nonprofit sector primarily. 74% are female and 29% are male. Columbia Heights is their neighborhood of choice. There are also large concentrations in Shaw, Bloomingdale, and Eastern Market.
 +
 
 +
==Membership Policy==
 +
 
 +
Membership in RPCV/W is open to all. First year is always free. Member dues have remained $15 per year since 1986.
 +
 
 +
* Members are eligible for discounts to special events.
 +
* Members are granted access to our online directory to search for and contact other members.
 +
* Members can register for and attend restricted "Members Only" events.
 +
* Members can access and freely network in our private Linkedin Group.
 +
* Members may submit news items, including fundraisers and events, to our weekly newsletter.
 +
* Members may post fundraisers or small events requiring payment in our Facebook Group, which serves as the public forum of our organization.
 +
* Members may participate in sub-committees called by the Board of Directors and lead Board-sanctioned events.
 +
* Members shape the organization by organizing clubs, electing the Board of Directors, and assuming leadership roles.
 +
 
 +
==External Links==
 +
[http://rpcvw.org/?utm_source=peacecorpswiki&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=PCWiki Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington D.C.]
 +
 
 +
[http://www.facebook.com/rpcvw RPCV/W's Facebook Page]
 +
 
 +
[http://www.facebook.com/groups/rpcvw/ RPCV/W's Facebook Group]
 +
 
 +
[http://www.twitter.com/rpcvw/ RPCV/W's Twitter Feed]
 +
 
 +
[http://www.rpcvw.us4.list-manage1.com/subscribe?u=6542714c69023bc7f6fa51510&id=b97898cf65/ RPCV/W's Free Weekly Newsletter]
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Regional Associations]]
 +
[[Category:RPCV Associations]]
 +
[[Category:RPCV 50th Anniversary]]
 +
[[Category:RPCV/W]]

Latest revision as of 08:18, 21 May 2014

About Us[edit]

“Bringing the Experience Home”

RPCV/W is a volunteer-run organization representing the sizable community of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers and friends who live and work in the DC metropolitan region. They undertake 3-4 events per month and focus on three primary activities.

  • Holding social events such as happy hours, parties, field trips, and other fun, interest-based activities. Any member may start a club and utilize our network to organize it.
  • Helping local nonprofits engaged in community development meet their needs for volunteer assistance by organizing regular service projects and partnering toward shared goals.
  • Helping members advance their careers through structured professional development events and by establishing a vibrant, organized network of mentors in various industries.

From time to time, they also engage in events of a symbolic or historic nature, such as marching in a parade or participating in a public ceremony. Membership is open to all who share a passion for community service, professional development, and international engagement.

2012-2013 Mission Statement[edit]

"To serve as a resource to RPCVs and friends in the Washington DC area through social events, community service projects, and professional development programs that embody the 3rd Goal and spirit of the Peace Corps."

The Mission Statement may be revised each year by the current Board of Directors.

Primary Programs[edit]

In addition to organizing regular social events for members, RPCV/W divides its long-term programming into four areas:

Community Service[edit]

RPCV/W is committed to supporting local organizations engaged in community development in the DC area. Being all volunteers at heart, their members enjoy coming out on a weekend to assist with a worthy cause. Service events are organized by their Community Service Director. Local organizations are encouraged to submit calls for volunteers in their weekly newsletter.

Partnership for Peace[edit]

Each year, RPCV/W enters into a special relationship with a grassroots nonprofit that shares its goals and values. In addition to awarding them a cash grant based on the proceeds of their yearly fundraiser, they advertise their events and helps them organize volunteers for their activities. The Vice President is charged with coordinating and strengthening the PfP program. The process begins with a call for proposals, the Board selects the finalists, and group members vote for a winner during the end-of-year elections.

Professional Development[edit]

RPCV/W strongly believes that all RPCVs should be encouraged to network freely, and urges its members to make time for their peers who are looking to climb the ladder. To this end, they host regular networking events and career panels. They also track various RPCV groups that exist within government agencies and large employers. This program is overseen by a Professional Development Director who acts as the organization's chief networker and job coach. Jobs are posted in RPCV/W's Linkedin Group and individual members often post opportunities in its Facebook Group.

Special Events[edit]

RPCV/W is often called upon to plan and participate in major public events. In September of 2011, RPCV/W organized the 50th Anniversary of the Peace Corps commemoration at Arlington National Cemetery, which hosted over 5,000 participants and included a parade across the Memorial Bridge. Since 1984, they have gathered each year to lay flowers at the gravesite of John F. Kennedy. They have marched with Peace Corps in Presidential Inaugurations and are now participating in DC's LGBT Capitol Pride Parade.

Other Services[edit]

Social Media[edit]

RPCV/W maintains a Facebook Group, Facebook Page, Twitter Feed, Linkedin Group, and a group on the NPCA Ning Network. It also maintains a robust website that allows members to interact with eachother, and a weekly newsletter that any member can utilize. With these tools, it is able to reach thousands of RPCVs and others.

The Facebook Group is a popular spot for new arrivals to introduce themselves and ask about housing or jobs. Members with property to lease naturally prefer RPCV tenants, and use the group as an alternative to Craigslist. Some use it to ask the group to recommend services, places to eat, and things to do. Members may fundraise and share their causes there. In short, it's an open forum which supplements our physical activities and keeps the network fresh.

The Linkedin Group is similar, but less outwardly active. Most of its use happens behind the scenes, as members search out peers to network for professional opportunities. The Twitter Feed and Facebook Page are controlled by the Public Relations Director, who is charged with keeping members informed and engaged.

Innovation[edit]

Members of RPCV/W are closely involved in the Peace Corps Innovation Challenge, and the organization promotes innovative uses of technology to benefit serving PCVs and returned volunteers.

History[edit]

RPCVs have been coming to DC since the Peace Corps was founded. Many were involved in the Peace Movement of the 1960s and there are several documented instances where RPCVs gathered to protest the war in southeast Asia. They found jobs in the civil and foreign service and set down roots. They began forming groups in the 1970’s, banding together for social solidarity and to support projects abroad. RPCV/W was formed in 1979 as an offshoot of the National Council of Returned Volunteers, which is now known as the National Peace Corps Association. RPCVs in DC banded together to do service projects, network, and commemorate special events such as Peace Corps anniversaries. RPCV/W was formally incorporated as a 501c3 nonprofit organization in 1991. As the years passed, a diverse, multi-generational community of RPCVs came into being, with new members arriving every week.

There are an estimated 5,000 Returned Peace Corps Volunteers living in the Washington, DC Metro area. Over 1,000 are active, dues-paying members of RPCV/W.

According to a 2012 survey, most of RPCV/W's members join to network, make friends, and to become familiar with the DC Peace Corps Community. 83% attended at least one event throughout the year. 85% receive the weekly email newsletter. Most reported making friends, participating in events, and getting involved with local volunteer projects. Others reported getting jobs, finding mentors, and even meeting their significant other through the network.

The median age of RPCV/W's membership is 32, and over half possess an advanced degree. They work in international development and the nonprofit sector primarily. 74% are female and 29% are male. Columbia Heights is their neighborhood of choice. There are also large concentrations in Shaw, Bloomingdale, and Eastern Market.

Membership Policy[edit]

Membership in RPCV/W is open to all. First year is always free. Member dues have remained $15 per year since 1986.

  • Members are eligible for discounts to special events.
  • Members are granted access to our online directory to search for and contact other members.
  • Members can register for and attend restricted "Members Only" events.
  • Members can access and freely network in our private Linkedin Group.
  • Members may submit news items, including fundraisers and events, to our weekly newsletter.
  • Members may post fundraisers or small events requiring payment in our Facebook Group, which serves as the public forum of our organization.
  • Members may participate in sub-committees called by the Board of Directors and lead Board-sanctioned events.
  • Members shape the organization by organizing clubs, electing the Board of Directors, and assuming leadership roles.

External Links[edit]

Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington D.C.

RPCV/W's Facebook Page

RPCV/W's Facebook Group

RPCV/W's Twitter Feed

RPCV/W's Free Weekly Newsletter