Difference between pages "Packing list for Mozambique" and "Armenia"

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{{Packing lists by country}}
+
{{CountryboxAlternative
 +
|status= [[ACTIVE]]
 +
|Countryname= Armenia
 +
|CountryCode= am
 +
|Flag= Flag_of_Armenia.svg
 +
|Welcomebooklink = http://www.peacecorps.gov/welcomebooks/amwb305.pdf
 +
|Region= [[Eastern Europe and Central Asia]]
 +
|CountryDirector= [[David Lillie]]
 +
|Sectors= [[Education]]<br> ([[APCD]]: [[Gayane Zargaryan]])<br>[[Business]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Stepan S'hoyan]])<br>
 +
|ProgramDates= [[1992]] - [[Present]]
 +
|CurrentlyServing= 96
 +
|TotalVolunteers= 583+
 +
|Languages= [[Armenian]] (official), [[Russian]] (learned in school, not offical), [[Georgian]] (not common), [[Yazidi]] (not common), and [[Azeri]] (not common)
 +
|Map= Am-map.gif
 +
|stagingdate= Jun 1 2011
 +
|stagingcity= Philadelphia
 +
}}
  
This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[Mozambique]] and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage. You can get almost everything you need in Mozambique, including clothing, so do not try to bring two years’ worth of everything.  
+
Peace Corps Volunteers assist the government of Armenia in an effort to address multiple development challenges. Currently, the Peace Corps places its emphasis on sustainable capacity-building projects in the areas of Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) and Community and Business Development (CBD). The environmental education (EE) and community health education (CHE) programs have been closed as of September 2010. The objective is not to teach Armenians “American” values, but to help them help themselves within their own cultural framework.
  
When choosing luggage, remember that you will be hauling it in and out of taxis, trains, and buses and often lugging it around on foot. It should be durable, lightweight, lockable, and easy to carry. Wheels are a plus, especially those that allow you to wheel the luggage over nonpaved surfaces. Nylon is the best material for resisting mold. A backpack without a frame is very practical, and a midsize backpack (2,000 to 3,000 cubic inches) for weekend trips is essential. A regular-size book bag is also a good thing to bring.
 
  
===General Clothing ===
+
== Peace Corps History==
  
Most clothes are washed by hand using harsh detergents and rocks for scrubbing. This method and the intense sun wear out clothes quickly, so try to bring lightweight but sturdy clothes. Clothes made of rayon or nylon are good, since they dry quickly and do not need ironing. Although lightweight fabrics are best for the hot climate, it can get cold in the winter (45 to 55 degrees Fahrenheit), especially in poorly insulated housing, so you will need some warm clothes too.
+
''Main article: [[History of Peace Corps in Armenia]]''
  
White clothes soil easily, so colored clothing is best for hiding dirt. Dry cleaning is not really an option for Volunteers because of the expense and the limited availability. It is a good idea to bring one outfit for special occasions, such as the swearing-in ceremony, going out in Maputo, or attending a cocktail party at the U.S. ambassador’s residence.  
+
The Peace Corps program in Armenia began in 1992.  During the first years, conditions were very difficult, with no electricity or heat. The country was reeling from the aftermath of the devastating 1988 earthquake, the breakup of the Soviet Union, and a war with Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh, an Armenian enclave. Since then, more than 500 Volunteers have served in Armenia.
  
Unisex Items
 
  
* Lightweight coat or jacket
 
* Waterproof rain jacket or poncho
 
* Swimsuit
 
* Two pairs of jeans or casual pants – the comfy ones that you wear at home
 
* Two or three pairs of walking-length shorts
 
* T-shirts (in neutral colors)
 
* Sweatpants
 
* One or two heavy sweatshirts or sweaters
 
* One or two long-sleeved shirts
 
* Six to eight pairs of good-quality socks
 
  
For Men
+
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
  
* Two or three pairs of dress pants
+
''Main article: [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in Armenia]]''
* Three or four button-down shirts, both short- and long-sleeved
+
* One or two ties
+
* Six to eight pairs of underwear
+
* Shorts
+
* One or two belts
+
  
For Women
+
During pre-service training, all trainees are required to live with host families. After completing pre-service training and swearing-in, all Volunteers live with host families for a minimum of four months at their permanent site. Living with a host family provides several benefits including accelerated language acquisition; a deeper and more profound cross-cultural understanding; and an improved, in-depth community integration. Being a respected and equal member of a family not only provides strong personal and professional rewards, it can ensure your safety and security as well. Host family accommodations will vary depending on the community. Some may be apartments or separate detached houses; some may have European-style bathrooms while others might use "outhouses" or "squat" toilets. Regardless of the situation, trainees and Volunteers live as the members of their community do. After the four-month period, Volunteers may remain with host families or change to another living situation in their communities depending on availability and personal preferences.
  
* Three to five knee-length or longer skirts or dresses
+
==Training==
* Three to five button-up or collared dress shirts 
+
* Two nice pairs of pants for work (black or brown is professional; khakis are also good)
+
* One nice outfit for going out
+
* Tank tops are fine as long as they are not spaghetti straps
+
* Five to seven T-shirts
+
* Ten to 20 pairs of underwear
+
* Cotton bras and sports bras
+
  
Shoes
+
''Main article: [[Training in Armenia]]''
  
Volunteers walk many miles every week, so shoes wear out quickly. Past Volunteers recommend newer and more expensive footwear because it will last longer. Female Volunteers suggest bringing one pair of fashionable sandals or shoes, as there are chances to dress up a bit and go out in Maputo. People with large feet (especially men or women who wear size 11 or larger) should bring an extra pair or two of shoes, as larger sizes are hard to come by in Mozambique.  
+
Training is an essential part of Peace Corps service. The goal of the nine-week program is to give you the skills and information you need to live and work effectively in Armenia. In doing that, we build upon the experiences and expertise you bring to the Peace Corps. The program also gives you the opportunity to practice new skills as they apply to your work in Armenia. We anticipate that you will approach training with an open mind, a desire to learn, and a willingness to become involved. Trainees officially become Volunteers only after successful completion of training.
  
* Closed walking shoes
+
You will receive training and orientation in components of language, cross-cultural communication, development issues, health and personal safety, and technical skills pertinent to your specific assignment. The skills you learn will serve as the foundation upon which you build your experience as a Peace Corps Volunteer.
* Athletic shoes
+
* Waterproof, low-top, all-purpose walking / running shoes with good soles
+
* Sturdy sandals
+
  
Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
+
Upon arrival in Armenia, you will go to the Peace Corps training center a few hours outside of Yerevan. After a brief orientation period, you will move into a host village within an hour of the training center. In the host village, you and other trainees (about 8 to a village) will live with a Armenian host family for the majority of your training period, allowing you to gain hands-on experience in some of the new skills you are expected to acquire.
  
You should bring only enough of your usual toiletry items to get you through your first months in Mozambique. All the basic items one finds in the United States are available at reasonable prices in Mozambique, albeit in a limited selection. However, if you have some space it is a good idea to bring a couple of months’ worth of your favorite toiletries;
+
==Health Care and Safety==
  
Volunteers especially suggest deodorant (the variety available in Mozambique is limited), good razors (hard to find), and shaving cream (expensive).
+
''Main article: [[Health care and safety in Armenia]]''
  
You do not need a two-year supply of aspirin, vitamins, dental floss, and insect repellent because the Peace Corps provides such items after training. But do bring a three-month supply of any prescription drugs you take, to cover what you will need until the Peace Corps medical office can order more for you.  
+
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. The Peace Corps in Armenia maintains a clinic with two full-time medical officers, who take care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are also available in Armenia at local hospitals and clinics. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported to a medical facility in the region or to the United States.
  
Kitchen
+
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
  
You can easily buy most kitchen supplies—dishes, pots, glasses, and utensils—in Mozambique. Consider bringing small packages of soft-drink and sauce mixes and some spices.  Peace Corps/Mozambique will provide you with a locally appropriate cookbook.
+
''Main article: [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Armenia]]''
  
Miscellaneous
+
In Armenia, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Armenia.
  
* Journal and/or sketch books
+
Outside of Armenia’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and Caucasian. The people of Armenia are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.  
* Watch—reliable, durable, preferably with indiglo, but inexpensive
+
* One medium-size cotton towel
+
* Makeup (you can get makeup here, but good makeup can be expensive and hard to find)
+
* Slippers or socks to keep your feet warm in the winter
+
* Money belt that fits under your clothes
+
* Visor/hat
+
* Duct tape (extremely useful and unavailable locally); also rope/string
+
* Swiss army or Leatherman knife, preferably with bottle and can openers 
+
* Sewing kit with clothing thread and nylon thread for fixing bags and hanging items on walls in your home
+
* Small, portable tool kit
+
* Pictures of home, family, friends, or anything “American”
+
* Sturdy water bottle (e.g., Nalgene; available at any sporting good store)
+
* Self-adhesive U.S. stamps, including a few one-cent stamps
+
* Lightweight sleeping bag or fleece blanket
+
* Flashlight—(e.g., Maglite) or a headlamp with extra batteries and bulbs is useful
+
* Camera, film or digital (Advantix is not available in Mozambique), and batteries
+
* Plastic storage bags—a must
+
* Walkman, Discman, iPod or tape recorder with portable speakers
+
* Mini voice recorder (help with Portuguese accents, local dialects, and recording beautiful impromptu music sessions) Your favorite music mp3s, tapes or CDs
+
* Shortwave radio (Some Volunteers recommend Radio Shack’s DX 375, about $80, because it is easy to tune)
+
*      Solar bulbs or/and solar power panels. With a power panel you can charge your cell or any other low-voltage USB-port devices, such as IPod, Kindle, etc. All you need is sun, and that's plentiful. You may want to check the Nokero and Solio products. Peace Corps Volunteers get a 25%-50% discount on Nokero products when they join Market for Change [http://www.marketforchange.com].
+
* Games and/or cards (Scrabble, Uno, Phase 10, etc.)
+
* Funds for travel and vacations (cash and credit cards are more practical than traveler’s checks)
+
* Compact umbrella
+
* Compact tent, if you like to camp
+
* Hobby materials
+
* Art supplies
+
* Seeds for vegetable garden
+
* Favorite books
+
* Dictionary
+
* Teaching supplies (e.g., colored chalk, felt-tipped markers, crayons, books for science teachers)
+
  
Volunteers recommend that you not bring a solar shower, sheets, two-year supply of vitamins, pencils, flip-flops, and toothbrushes. Nor should you bring anything you would be heartbroken to lose. The main things to bring are yourself and a sense of service and adventure!
+
* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
 +
* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
 +
* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
 +
* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
 +
* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
 +
* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
  
[[Category:Mozambique]]
+
==Frequently Asked Questions==
 +
 
 +
{{Volunteersurvey2008
 +
|H1r= 17
 +
|H1s= 76.3
 +
|H2r= 25
 +
|H2s= 85.3
 +
|H3r= 14
 +
|H3s= 87.8
 +
|H4r= 46
 +
|H4s= 103.0
 +
|H5r= 30
 +
|H5s= 54.0
 +
|H6r= 44
 +
|H6s= 79.1
 +
}}
 +
 
 +
''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Armenia]]''
 +
 
 +
* How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Armenia?
 +
* What is the electric current in Armenia?
 +
* How much money should I bring?
 +
* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
 +
* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
 +
* Do I need an international driver’s license?
 +
* What should I bring as gifts for Armenian friends and my host family?
 +
* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
 +
* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
 +
* Can I call home from Armenia?
 +
* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
 +
 
 +
==Packing List==
 +
 
 +
''Main article: [[Packing list for Armenia]]''
 +
 
 +
This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Armenia and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage. Do not bring valuables or cherished items that could be lost, stolen, or ruined by the harsh climate. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Armenia.
 +
 
 +
* General
 +
* Packing for training
 +
* Clothing
 +
* Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
 +
* Kitchen
 +
* Additional Items to Consider Bringing
 +
* Items You Do Not Need to Bring
 +
 
 +
 
 +
== Volunteer Projects ==
 +
 
 +
''Main article: [[Volunteer projects of Peace Corps in Armenia]]''
 +
 
 +
Peace Corps Volunteers in Armenia have initiated many projects in Peace Corps and some have started websites to promote these projects in Armenia and abroad. Some RPCVs have started American nonprofits to provide continued support to the projects they initiated during their Peace Corps service.
 +
 
 +
==Peace Corps News==
 +
 
 +
Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
 +
 
 +
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22armenia%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
 +
 
 +
<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off number=10>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/am/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
 +
 
 +
==Country Fund==
 +
 
 +
Contributions to the [https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.donors.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=305-CFD Armenia Country Fund] will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Armenia. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.
 +
 
 +
==See also==
 +
* [[Armenian]]
 +
* [[Volunteers who served in Armenia]]
 +
* [[Staff members who served in Armenia]]
 +
* [[Armenia books]]
 +
* [[Armenia web resources]]
 +
* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
 +
* [[Inspector General Reports]]
 +
* [[Treaties for Peace Corps by US State Department]]
 +
 
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Eastern Europe and Central Asia]]
 +
[[Category:Country]]
 +
[[Category:Armenia]]
 +
[[Property::Located in::Eastern Europe and Central Asia]]

Revision as of 07:56, 21 May 2014


US Peace Corps
Country name is::Armenia


Status: ACTIVE
Staging: {{#ask:Country staging date::+country name is::Armenia[[Staging date::>2014-10-23]]

mainlabel=- ?staging date= ?staging city= format=list sort=Staging date

}}


American Overseas Staff (FY2010): {{#ask:2010_pcstaff_salary::+country name is::Armenia

mainlabel=- ?Grade_staff= ?Lastname_staff= ?Firstname_staff= ?Middlename_staff= ?Initial_staff= ?Salary_staff=$ format=list sort=Grade_staff

}}


Latest Early Termination Rates (FOIA 11-058): {{#ask:Country_early_termination_rate::+country name is::Armenia

mainlabel=- ?2005_early_termination=2005 ?2006_early_termination=2006 ?2007_early_termination=2007 ?2008_early_termination=2008 format=list

}}


Peace Corps Journals - Armenia File:Feedicon.gif

250px
Peace Corps Welcome Book
Region:

Eastern Europe and Central Asia

Country Director:

David Lillie

Sectors:

Education
(APCD: Gayane Zargaryan)
Business
(APCD: Stepan S'hoyan)

Program Dates:

1992 - Present

Current Volunteers:

96

Total Volunteers:

583+

Languages Spoken:

Armenian (official), Russian (learned in school, not offical), Georgian (not common), Yazidi (not common), and Azeri (not common)

Flag:

150px

__SHOWFACTBOX__

Peace Corps Volunteers assist the government of Armenia in an effort to address multiple development challenges. Currently, the Peace Corps places its emphasis on sustainable capacity-building projects in the areas of Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) and Community and Business Development (CBD). The environmental education (EE) and community health education (CHE) programs have been closed as of September 2010. The objective is not to teach Armenians “American” values, but to help them help themselves within their own cultural framework.


Peace Corps History

Main article: History of Peace Corps in Armenia

The Peace Corps program in Armenia began in 1992. During the first years, conditions were very difficult, with no electricity or heat. The country was reeling from the aftermath of the devastating 1988 earthquake, the breakup of the Soviet Union, and a war with Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh, an Armenian enclave. Since then, more than 500 Volunteers have served in Armenia.


Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle

Main article: Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in Armenia

During pre-service training, all trainees are required to live with host families. After completing pre-service training and swearing-in, all Volunteers live with host families for a minimum of four months at their permanent site. Living with a host family provides several benefits including accelerated language acquisition; a deeper and more profound cross-cultural understanding; and an improved, in-depth community integration. Being a respected and equal member of a family not only provides strong personal and professional rewards, it can ensure your safety and security as well. Host family accommodations will vary depending on the community. Some may be apartments or separate detached houses; some may have European-style bathrooms while others might use "outhouses" or "squat" toilets. Regardless of the situation, trainees and Volunteers live as the members of their community do. After the four-month period, Volunteers may remain with host families or change to another living situation in their communities depending on availability and personal preferences.

Training

Main article: Training in Armenia

Training is an essential part of Peace Corps service. The goal of the nine-week program is to give you the skills and information you need to live and work effectively in Armenia. In doing that, we build upon the experiences and expertise you bring to the Peace Corps. The program also gives you the opportunity to practice new skills as they apply to your work in Armenia. We anticipate that you will approach training with an open mind, a desire to learn, and a willingness to become involved. Trainees officially become Volunteers only after successful completion of training.

You will receive training and orientation in components of language, cross-cultural communication, development issues, health and personal safety, and technical skills pertinent to your specific assignment. The skills you learn will serve as the foundation upon which you build your experience as a Peace Corps Volunteer.

Upon arrival in Armenia, you will go to the Peace Corps training center a few hours outside of Yerevan. After a brief orientation period, you will move into a host village within an hour of the training center. In the host village, you and other trainees (about 8 to a village) will live with a Armenian host family for the majority of your training period, allowing you to gain hands-on experience in some of the new skills you are expected to acquire.

Health Care and Safety

Main article: Health care and safety in Armenia

The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. The Peace Corps in Armenia maintains a clinic with two full-time medical officers, who take care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are also available in Armenia at local hospitals and clinics. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported to a medical facility in the region or to the United States.

Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues

Main article: Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Armenia

In Armenia, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Armenia.

Outside of Armenia’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and Caucasian. The people of Armenia are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.

  • Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
  • Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
  • Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities

Frequently Asked Questions

Armenia
2008 Volunteer Survey Results

How personally rewarding is your overall Peace Corps service?|}} Rank:
2008 H1r::17|}}
Score:
2008 H1s::76.3|}}
Today would you make the same decision to join the Peace Corps?|}} Rank:
2008 H2r::25|}}
Score:
2008 H2s::85.3|}}
Would you recommend Peace Corps service to others you think are qualified?|}} Rank:
2008 H3r::14|}}
Score:
2008 H3s::87.8|}}
Do you intend to complete your Peace Corps service?|}} Rank:
2008 H4r::46|}}
Score:
2008 H4s::103.0|}}
How well do your Peace Corps experiences match the expectations you had before you became a Volunteer?|}} Rank:
2008 H5r::30|}}
Score:
2008 H5s::54.0|}}
Would your host country benefit the most if the Peace Corps program were---?|}} Rank:
2008 H6r::44|}}
Score:
2008 H6s::79.1|}}
2008BVS::Armenia


Main article: FAQs about Peace Corps in Armenia

  • How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Armenia?
  • What is the electric current in Armenia?
  • How much money should I bring?
  • When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
  • Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
  • Do I need an international driver’s license?
  • What should I bring as gifts for Armenian friends and my host family?
  • Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
  • How can my family contact me in an emergency?
  • Can I call home from Armenia?
  • Should I bring a cellular phone with me?

Packing List

Main article: Packing list for Armenia

This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Armenia and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage. Do not bring valuables or cherished items that could be lost, stolen, or ruined by the harsh climate. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Armenia.

  • General
  • Packing for training
  • Clothing
  • Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
  • Kitchen
  • Additional Items to Consider Bringing
  • Items You Do Not Need to Bring


Volunteer Projects

Main article: Volunteer projects of Peace Corps in Armenia

Peace Corps Volunteers in Armenia have initiated many projects in Peace Corps and some have started websites to promote these projects in Armenia and abroad. Some RPCVs have started American nonprofits to provide continued support to the projects they initiated during their Peace Corps service.

Peace Corps News

Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by country of service or your home state

The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.
<rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22armenia%22&output=rss%7Ccharset=UTF-8%7Cshort%7Cdate=M d</rss>


PEACE CORPS JOURNALS
( As of Thursday October 23, 2014 )<rss title=off desc=off number=10>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/am/blog/50.xml%7Ccharset=UTF-8%7Cshort%7Cmax=10</rss>

Country Fund

Contributions to the Armenia Country Fund will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Armenia. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.

See also