Difference between pages "Georgia" and "Packing list for East Timor"

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{{CountryboxAlternative
 
|Countryname= Georgia
 
|CountryCode = gg
 
|status= [[Present]]
 
|Flag=
 
|Welcomebooklink = http://www.peacecorps.gov/welcomebooks/gewb242.pdf
 
|Region= [[Eastern Europe and Central Asia]]
 
|CountryDirector= [[Rick Record]]
 
|Sectors= [[Education]]<br> [[NGO Development]]
 
|ProgramDates= [[2001]] - [[Present]]
 
|CurrentlyServing= 69
 
|TotalVolunteers= 297
 
|Languages= [[Georgian]]
 
|Map= Gg-map.gif
 
|stagingdate= Apr 26 2010
 
|stagingcity= Philadelphia
 
}}
 
  
The first Peace Corps Volunteers arrived in March 2001. They serve in rural communities and towns throughout the country, where they focus on offering and enhancing English education for Georgian students and teaching methodologies for Georgian teachers. Technical sectors in Georgia include education and non-governmental organization development.
+
Use this list as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage.  
  
 +
===General Clothing ===
  
==Peace Corps History==
+
East Timor is a conservative society, and dressing modestly and neatly is important. Norms regarding Western clothing are changing rapidly so it is difficult to make a list that will apply for very long. Many people still wear traditional dress (sarongs for both men and women), although in the capital and district centers people wear Western clothing. Shorts, tank tops, and short skirts are not appropriate for office work where many health promotion and community devlopment Volunteers will work. You should pack casual clothing for your time away from the office and for vacations and leisure time outside of East Timor. Many Volunteers in the community development project can dress more casually (although still conservatively) in their day-to-day work. Many Volunteers in both groups also have gardening projects and will need at least one set of sturdy yet cool work clothes.
  
''Main article: [[History of the Peace Corps in Georgia]]''
+
Be prepared for a range of temperatures. You are likely to do a lot of walking, and the terrain will be hard on shoes. Finding clothes and shoes of the quality and size you desire may be a challenge in East Timor, especially if you wear larger sizes.  Timorese are generally slender and shorter than Americans.
  
As early as 1994, the government of Georgia indicated its desire to host Peace Corps Volunteers. Although the Peace Corps sent an assessment team to Georgia in response to that request, a decision to enter Georgia was indefinitely postponed due to security concerns over civil unrest in the Abkhazia and Ossetia provinces. In 1997, the Georgian government formally reiterated its desire to host Peace Corps Volunteers, and again an assessment team was sent. Although the security situation had significantly improved by this time, budgetary constraints prevented the Peace Corps from acting upon this request, and the decision was delayed yet again. In late 1999, after repeated inquiries from the Georgian government and consistent accounts from the U.S. Embassy in Tbilisi that the security situation remained conducive to the presence of Peace Corps Volunteers, the decision was made to reassess the possibility of setting up a program. The review was positive, and funds were set aside by the Peace Corps to establish a program in Georgia in 2000.
+
Be prepared for a lot of down time. Bring things you like to do or would like to do. If you’ve always wanted to learn to play a musical instrument, now is your opportunity.  
  
 +
Following are some specific clothing and shoe recommendations.
  
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles==
 
  
''Main article: [[Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles in Georgia]]''
 
  
Volunteers need to be very flexible about their housing expectations. Volunteers live in a variety of situations, including private rooms, shared houses, and small apartments.
+
* Casual pants (four to five pair in thin and light materials such as chinos, cotton or linen) for work (men)
 +
* Skirts or dresses (below the knee) for work; in some but not all communities women can also wear pants to the office
 +
* Shorts below the knee (a few pairs), but no short-shorts; women wear longer-length board shorts here
 +
* One or two nice outfits—dress slacks or neat khakis and at least one tie for men (suits or sports coats are almost never worn here), skirt or dress for women (also in lightweight materials, preferrably cotton or linen)
 +
* Shirts (button-down, polo, and T-shirts) and blouses (no crop tops, spagetti straps, or skimpy tank tops); one long-sleeve shirt or blouse for higher altitudes (if you burn easily, you may want more lightweight long-sleeve items)
 +
* Cotton lightweight underwear
 +
* One set of strong but not heavy work clothing (avoid denim)
 +
* One sweatshirt or sweater for high altitudes
 +
* Socks
 +
* Rain jacket/poncho (or a very lightweight, water-resistant windbreaker)
 +
* Swimsuit (one piece) (no bikinis for men or women)
 +
* Hat or cap (the sun is fierce) 
  
For the first three months of your service, you are required to live with a Georgian host family. After the first three months, alternative housing arrangements may be considered in consultation with your program manager and the medical officer. For reasons of safety and security and for reasons of quality of life (especially during the winter months), most Volunteers opt to remain living with homestay families throughout their two years of service. In most areas of Georgia there are no guarantees of continuous electricity, running water, or phone service. Some villages and towns have only a few hours of electricity a day (or even none at all) in the winter months, and the natural gas supply is often cut off for periods of time. Without a central heating system, the inside of buildings is often colder in the winter than the outdoors. You should be prepared to tolerate cold and discomfort, especially during the work day at school. The Peace Corps staff will do its best to help Volunteers adjust and succeed in this environment. Peace Corps/Georgia provides all Volunteers with sleeping bags for the winter. These sleeping bags have a synthetic filling and are rated at 0°F for warmth.
+
===Shoes ===
  
==Training==
+
* One pair of dress shoes (dressy sandals are fine for women although Timorese women tend to wear heels to events such as weddings)
 +
* Flip-flops (readily available locally)
 +
* Sturdy sandals such as Tevas/Chakos/Berks
 +
* Sturdy walking shoes (locals hike in sandals or even flip-flops)
 +
* Running shoes or sneakers (if you play soccer, you may want to bring spikes) Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
 +
* Start-up supply of soap, shampoo, deodorant, razors, etc. (easy to get here)
 +
* Any specific brands that you feel you cannot live without (selection is limited)
 +
* Tampons (to cover the first six months if you require a particular kind)
 +
* Small lightweight hand towel (available here but quality is limited) Miscellaneous
 +
* Two pair of glasses
 +
* Supply of your prescriptions and/or hearing aid batteries
 +
* Sunglasses with UV protection (available here)
 +
* Sturdy backpack for short trips
 +
* Pouch and/or belt for your money and passport (to wear under your clothing)
 +
* Utility knife (e.g., Leatherman or Swiss army knife)
 +
* Flashlight (good quality) or head-lamp 
 +
* Small light travel alarm or wristwatch with alarm
 +
* Camera (digital are popular; 35 mm developing available but not high quality unless you have the film developed in Bali on vacation)
 +
* Water bottle (good quality)
 +
* Money, traveler’s checks or credit card for vacations
 +
* Photos, games, maps from home, books, airgrams, and hobby materials
 +
* Small inexpensive presents for your training family and your host family Optional
 +
* IPod or CD walkman
 +
* Battery-operated shortwave radio if interested in BBC or Voice Of America
 +
* Musical instrument (remember luggage weight and size restrictions)
 +
* Sports equipment (soccer and basketballs are available here)
 +
* Laptop
 +
* Snorkeling gear (with booties for coral protection)
 +
* Summer-weight sleeping bag
  
''Main article: [[Training in Georgia]]''
+
===Don’t Bring ===
  
Following a pre-departure orientation (staging) in the United States, you will participate in a 10-week, intensive pre-service training in Georgia. Peace Corps/Georgia uses a community-based training model that is designed around real life experiences and emphasizes community involvement. Trainees live with host families in one of several training villages around a central training facility outside the capital.
+
* Among the things you do not need to bring (because they are provided by the Peace Corps) are over-thecounter medications and first-aid items, mosquito repellent, mosquito net, mosquito-proof tent, bicycle and helmet, water filter, or sunscreen
 +
* Black clothing is used only for mourning after a death; white gets dirty easily (you will be hand-washing eveything) 
 +
* Cellphone
 +
* Anything valuable or sentimental that you wouldn’t want to lose
  
The goals of community-based training are:
 
  
# To provide in-depth, experiential learning in settings similar to those at Volunteer sites;
 
# To give trainees the best possible opportunity to gain competence in technical, cross-cultural, language, and health and safety areas in a culturally and linguistically appropriate context;
 
# To allow trainees to acquire experience and skills in self-directing their own learning so they can continue independent learning at site.
 
  
Pre-service training contains five main components: technical, language, cross-cultural, health, and safety.
+
[[Category:East Timor]]
 
 
 
 
==Your Health Care and Safety==
 
 
 
''Main article: [[Health Care and Safety in Georgia]]''
 
 
 
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative approach to disease. Peace Corps/Georgia maintains a clinic with a full-time medical officer who takes care of Volunteers’ primary health-care needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are also available in Georgia at local, American-standard clinics. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported to either an American medical facility in the region or to the United States.
 
 
 
 
 
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
 
 
 
''Main article: [[Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues in Georgia]]''
 
 
 
In Georgia, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyles, background, and beliefs will be judged in a cultural context very different from our own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in some host countries.
 
 
 
Outside of Georgia’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What is advertised as “typical” cultural behavior or norms may also be a narrow and selective interpretation, such as the perception in some countries that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Georgia are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to differences that you present.
 
 
 
* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
 
* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
 
* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
==Frequently Asked questions==
 
 
 
{{Volunteersurvey2008
 
|H1r=  36
 
|H1s=  72.3
 
|H2r=  28
 
|H2s=  85.1
 
|H3r=  23
 
|H3s=  86.8
 
|H4r=  34
 
|H4s=  105
 
|H5r=  13
 
|H5s=  58.3
 
|H6r=  20
 
|H6s=  91.9
 
}}
 
 
 
''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Georgia]]''
 
 
 
* How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Georgia?
 
* What is the electric current in Georgia?
 
* How much money should I bring?
 
* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
 
* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
 
* Do I need an international driver’s license?
 
* What should I bring as gifts for Georgia friends and my host family?
 
* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
 
* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
 
* Can I call home from Georgia?
 
* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
 
* Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?
 
 
 
 
 
==Packing List==
 
 
 
''Main article: [[Packing List for Georgia]]''
 
 
 
This list has been compiled with the assistance of Volunteers serving in Georgia. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have a 100 pound weight restriction on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Georgia.
 
 
 
* General Clothing
 
* Women
 
* Men
 
* Miscellaneous
 
 
 
==Peace Corps News==
 
 
 
Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
 
 
 
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22georgia%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
 
 
 
<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/gg/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
 
 
 
==See also==
 
* [[Volunteers who served in Georgia]]
 
* [[Inspector General Reports]]
 
* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
 
* [[List of resources for Georgia]]
 
 
 
==External links==
 
* [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/gg.html Peace Corps Journals - Georgia]
 
 
 
[[Category:Georgia]] [[Category:Eastern Europe and Central Asia]]
 
[[Category:Country]]
 

Revision as of 16:54, 8 April 2008

Use this list as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage.

General Clothing

East Timor is a conservative society, and dressing modestly and neatly is important. Norms regarding Western clothing are changing rapidly so it is difficult to make a list that will apply for very long. Many people still wear traditional dress (sarongs for both men and women), although in the capital and district centers people wear Western clothing. Shorts, tank tops, and short skirts are not appropriate for office work where many health promotion and community devlopment Volunteers will work. You should pack casual clothing for your time away from the office and for vacations and leisure time outside of East Timor. Many Volunteers in the community development project can dress more casually (although still conservatively) in their day-to-day work. Many Volunteers in both groups also have gardening projects and will need at least one set of sturdy yet cool work clothes.

Be prepared for a range of temperatures. You are likely to do a lot of walking, and the terrain will be hard on shoes. Finding clothes and shoes of the quality and size you desire may be a challenge in East Timor, especially if you wear larger sizes. Timorese are generally slender and shorter than Americans.

Be prepared for a lot of down time. Bring things you like to do or would like to do. If you’ve always wanted to learn to play a musical instrument, now is your opportunity.

Following are some specific clothing and shoe recommendations.


  • Casual pants (four to five pair in thin and light materials such as chinos, cotton or linen) for work (men)
  • Skirts or dresses (below the knee) for work; in some but not all communities women can also wear pants to the office
  • Shorts below the knee (a few pairs), but no short-shorts; women wear longer-length board shorts here
  • One or two nice outfits—dress slacks or neat khakis and at least one tie for men (suits or sports coats are almost never worn here), skirt or dress for women (also in lightweight materials, preferrably cotton or linen)
  • Shirts (button-down, polo, and T-shirts) and blouses (no crop tops, spagetti straps, or skimpy tank tops); one long-sleeve shirt or blouse for higher altitudes (if you burn easily, you may want more lightweight long-sleeve items)
  • Cotton lightweight underwear
  • One set of strong but not heavy work clothing (avoid denim)
  • One sweatshirt or sweater for high altitudes
  • Socks
  • Rain jacket/poncho (or a very lightweight, water-resistant windbreaker)
  • Swimsuit (one piece) (no bikinis for men or women)
  • Hat or cap (the sun is fierce)

Shoes

  • One pair of dress shoes (dressy sandals are fine for women although Timorese women tend to wear heels to events such as weddings)
  • Flip-flops (readily available locally)
  • Sturdy sandals such as Tevas/Chakos/Berks
  • Sturdy walking shoes (locals hike in sandals or even flip-flops)
  • Running shoes or sneakers (if you play soccer, you may want to bring spikes) Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
  • Start-up supply of soap, shampoo, deodorant, razors, etc. (easy to get here)
  • Any specific brands that you feel you cannot live without (selection is limited)
  • Tampons (to cover the first six months if you require a particular kind)
  • Small lightweight hand towel (available here but quality is limited) Miscellaneous
  • Two pair of glasses
  • Supply of your prescriptions and/or hearing aid batteries
  • Sunglasses with UV protection (available here)
  • Sturdy backpack for short trips
  • Pouch and/or belt for your money and passport (to wear under your clothing)
  • Utility knife (e.g., Leatherman or Swiss army knife)
  • Flashlight (good quality) or head-lamp
  • Small light travel alarm or wristwatch with alarm
  • Camera (digital are popular; 35 mm developing available but not high quality unless you have the film developed in Bali on vacation)
  • Water bottle (good quality)
  • Money, traveler’s checks or credit card for vacations
  • Photos, games, maps from home, books, airgrams, and hobby materials
  • Small inexpensive presents for your training family and your host family Optional
  • IPod or CD walkman
  • Battery-operated shortwave radio if interested in BBC or Voice Of America
  • Musical instrument (remember luggage weight and size restrictions)
  • Sports equipment (soccer and basketballs are available here)
  • Laptop
  • Snorkeling gear (with booties for coral protection)
  • Summer-weight sleeping bag

Don’t Bring

  • Among the things you do not need to bring (because they are provided by the Peace Corps) are over-thecounter medications and first-aid items, mosquito repellent, mosquito net, mosquito-proof tent, bicycle and helmet, water filter, or sunscreen
  • Black clothing is used only for mourning after a death; white gets dirty easily (you will be hand-washing eveything)
  • Cellphone
  • Anything valuable or sentimental that you wouldn’t want to lose