Difference between pages "Packing list for Tanzania" and "Training in Micronesia"

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{{Packing lists by country}}
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{| cellpadding="1" cellspacing="5" style="border: 1px solid #9866FF; background-color: #f3f3ff" width="300"
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| align="center" | '''<big>Country Resources</big>'''
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|-
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| width="50%" |
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*[[Packing lists by country]]
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*[[Training by country]] 
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*[[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles by country]]
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*[[Health care and safety by country]]
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*[[Diversity and cross-cultural issues by country]]
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*[[FAQs by country]]
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*[[History of the Peace Corps by country]] 
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|}
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</div>
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When you first join us in Pohnpei, the capital of the Federated States of Micronesia, you will participate in approximately nine weeks of pre-service training (PST). PST will help you to learn about your host country and island, learn about what it will be like to be a Peace Corps Volunteer in FSM/Palau, and learn about yourself.
  
This section has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[Tanzania]] and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight limit on baggage. Luggage should be durable, lockable, and easy to carry. Because you will probably travel a lot by bus, duffel bags or small internal frame backpacks are more practical than suitcases.  
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The goals of Peace Corps/Micronesia’s training program are to give you a “jump start” in learning about the culture and language of your host island, to help prepare you for community entry into the community in which you will serve, and to train you to be an effective observer/cultural student. PST helps prepare Volunteers to be development facilitators who can help their community prioritize local needs and desires and help initiate efforts to address these needs. During PST, you will learn some skills that will help you begin to get comfortable in a classroom environment. You will be introduced to the concepts of capacity building and sustainable development; you will have the opportunity to learn about local organizations, institutions, and leaders; and you will start to meet community partners. The goal of pre-service training is to help you successfully start a learning process that will continue throughout your service as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Micronesia.  
  
There are numerous used clothes markets throughout Tanzania where you can purchase inexpensive clothing.  Tailors can also make clothing for you. It is possible in the early weeks of training to buy most clothing you will need or to expand on what you have brought. Think of East Africa as the world’s largest thrift store; the clothing will all be familiar to you. Once at site, you can pick up quality used clothing at markets that are adequate for your service. Clothing found at markets generally range from $1-$5 for an article of clothing.  In addition, clothes in Tanzania are hand washed, hung dry and ironed. Therefore, cotton items generally tend to stretch out over time and some materials are not durable enough to endure hand washing.  
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Pre-service training consists of two phases. Phase I is conducted in Pohnpei and lasts approximately two to three weeks. This phase focuses on administrative and medical needs, PACA (participatory analysis for community action) introduction, gender and diversity differences, and general skills. Site selection also occurs during Phase I, and trainees will learn which island and community they will serve. Phase II is community-based training that lasts about six weeks. This training is held in each of the FSM states/Palau where trainees will be serving, and focuses on language and cultural skills.  
  
 +
Throughout training and to encourage community integration, trainees spend as much time as possible in a rural community setting away from the town centers. Trainees will live with host families during both phases. They learn about the daily life of Micronesians—their customs, attitudes, beliefs, morals, values, worldview, language, diet, and more.
  
===General Clothing ===
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A set of Peace Corps training competencies (technical, behavioral, cross cultural, medical, safety, and language) will drive activities throughout pre-service training. Evaluations will be conducted during PST so that trainees have ample opportunity to self-assess and to get feedback from training staff. Informal feedback will be given on a daily basis.
  
Tanzanians generally dress more conservatively than Americans do. During pre-service training and in office or school settings, you will be expected to dress professionallyThis means closed-toe shoes or sandals, trousers (not jeans), and shirts with collars for men and below-the-knee dresses or skirts for women. Although you can dress more casually while at home, most Tanzanians do not approve of short shorts, tank tops, or dirty or ripped clothing.  
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Peace Corps/FSM/Palau staff members will do all that they can to give you opportunities to learn about Micronesian culture, attitudes, and worldview. They will work hard to help you immerse in an environment that helps you learn the basics you need to know to become a Peace Corps VolunteerUltimately, you will be in control of your learning and have the responsibility to make the most of the learning opportunities you will have.  
  
In the following lists, items marked with an asterisk are difficult to find or very expensive to buy in Tanzania or are of poor quality.  
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It is a privilege to become a Peace Corps Volunteer. Trainees who successfully complete pre-service training and are recommended to be sworn-in as FSM/Palau Volunteers have earned this privilege through their perseverance, hard work, and patience.  
  
* One or two pairs of comfortable jeans or khakis (especially important for environment Volunteers who should bring three)
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====Cross-Cultural Training====
* Sleepwear
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* Two sweaters, fleece tops, or warm jackets and a stocking cap (some places in the southern highlands get cold in June and July)
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* Hat and sunglasses
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* Swimsuit
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* One or two long-sleeved T-shirts
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* Windbreaker or rain jacket*
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Note: If you have a specific brand you like or a unique piece of clothing or size that is hard to find, bring enough of that item for two years (e.g., size 13 shoes or sports bras are impossible to find).  
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The richness and quality of your experience over the next two years as a Peace Corps Volunteer will depend largely on your ability to participate in the everyday life of your community and of Micronesia as a whole. This ability depends upon your understanding of and adaptation to the norms and customs of Micronesian society.  
  
===For Women ===
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Like fluency in a language, fluency in a culture requires that the student understand the basic nature of cultures and how they are used, mastering some general rules of cultural “grammar” and a basic vocabulary. Pre-service training will give you opportunities to begin to become a student of Micronesian culture. As with language, however, fluency itself comes only with practice. Cultural “practice” takes place in Micronesian society, in the infinite variety of situations and settings that are there for you to discover. Your host family, your language and cross-cultural facilitator, your program assistant, and the contacts you make will be your most important sources of cross-cultural “conversation.” The more you make use of these helpful people, the more you will learn.
  
* Three to five cotton or polyester dresses or skirts (below the knee or longer); these are required for training 2 Peace coRPS 
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Throughout PST, cross-cultural training is also woven into training activities focused on technical, language, safety and security, and medical subjects. During Phase II, training is geared toward learning about the culture of your island of service to help improve your skills of perception, communication, and facilitation. Topics such as Micronesian community structure, family structure, gender and development, and traditional and political leadership structures are also addressed.
* Two or three blouses or dressy shirts (no bare shoulders)
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* One extra-nice dress for official functions (e.g., swearing-in ceremony)
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* Socks* (Tanzanian women generally do not wear pantyhose)
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* Two-year supply of underwear* (women must wear bras and slips)
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* One pair of lightweight, quick-drying ankle pants for travel and when riding a bike or exercising
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* Five or six short-sleeved T-shirts
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===For Men ===
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====Language Training====
  
* Three-to-five cotton or synthetic, dark-colored dress or casual pants
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The best way to integrate into another culture is through language. Knowledge of the local language will help you integrate into your community. As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. Language study will thus occupy the largest segment of training time.
* Six or seven button-down shirts (mix of short and long sleeved)
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* Two-year supply of underwear* and socks*
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* Three short-sleeved T-shirts
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* Two pairs of lightweight, quick-drying pants for travel, bike riding, and exercise
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* One jacket and tie for official functions
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* One or two pairs of shorts
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===Shoes ===
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Although many Micronesians speak English and are willing and sometimes eager to speak with you, the extent to which you truly integrate and what activities you can actively participate in will be closely tied to your ability to speak the local language. As many as 18 languages are spoken throughout Micronesia, and Peace Corps/Micronesia provides training in as many as 11 of them. As a Peace Corps trainee, you will begin to study the language of your island of service.  Micronesian instructors teach language classes with groups of three or four trainees.
  
* Two pairs of nice but comfortable shoes (to wear with professional clothes)
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In addition to time in class, you will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family. The goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills that you can continue to build on. Prior to your swearing-in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies during your two years of service.
* Durable walking shoes or hiking boots*
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* Sandals, e.g., Teva* brand or chacos* brand. Strongly recommended (a must for environment Volunteers)
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* One pair of sneakers or running shoes
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* Closed-toe shoes or dressy sandals
+
  
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By the end of PST, trainees are expected to achieve a minimum of level of proficiency. You must successfully meet these minimum language requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer.
  
Note: hiking boots are only necessary if you’re going to be doing a lot of mountain climbing. Even then, fairly high-quality used boots are available in-country. Your best bet may be to buy a decent pair of tennis shoes which will be more than adequate 99 percent of the time. Also, flip-flops are available in abundance; don’t bring any!
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====Technical Training====
  
===Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items ===
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Technical training will help you better understand the education and development challenges in Micronesia today.  Peace Corps/Micronesia focuses on introducing you to an array of local resources to use as well as experts with whom you may collaborate throughout your service. Training places great emphasis on learning how to identify the needs of the community in which you will live and work, transferring skills you have, and helping your community identify resources to meet its needs.
  
Most toiletries are readily available in Tanzania, but you may not find your favorite brand. You will not find good-quality hairbrushes or toothbrushes, and certain items will be comparatively expensive. If tampons (Tampax) are not available near your site, they will be supplied by the Peace Corps medical officer, so you do not need to bring them. Some Volunteers have highly recommended the new anti-bacterial lotion that you can just rub on your hands.  
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By the end of training, trainees should have a basic understanding of the education and youth context, methods for investigating and analyzing community interests, teaching English as a second language (TESL) teaching techniques, and educator resources, including tools and manuals.  
  
===Kitchen ===
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Goals for Peace Corps/Micronesia’s TESL & education for community development projects will be reviewed. You will learn about PACA, which is a set of tools to analyze community activities and priorities. You will learn about how Micronesian communities make decisions. And you will learn techniques that will help you be successful in the classroom.
  
Most household items are readily available but may not be of the best quality. If you like to cook, consider bringing some of the following items.
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====Health Training====
  
* Plastic ziploc storage bags of various sizes (a must to keep out unwanted crawling critters)*
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During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive healthcare and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in Micronesia. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living environment, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are also discussed.
* Multipurpose cookbook* (Fannie Farmer is a favorite of Volunteers
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* Good kitchen knife*
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* Measuring cups and spoons
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* Mexican or your favorite, unique spices* (most other spices are available especially Italian and Indian spices)
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* Various powdered mixes (e.g., soft-drink mixes, salad dressings, soups, and sauce packets) 4
+
  
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====Safety Training====
  
===Entertainment ===
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During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces risk in your home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.
  
Volunteers often have downtime, so bringing some of the items suggested below can make a difference. But remember that most rural areas do not have electricity. Consider bringing a good supply of batteries, including solar-powered batteries or rechargeable batteries and a charger. Please note that in Tanzania the electricity that is used is 210V.
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====Additional Trainings during Volunteer Service====
  
* Tape player or Walkman with small speakers and tapes (prerecorded and blank); for those without electricity, a Walkman uses fewer batteries than a large tape player
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Peace Corps/Micronesia’s training program aims to provide trainees and Volunteers with ongoing opportunities to continue their learning and development, to share their successes and challenges, and to develop strategies for working through the inevitable bumps that will occur along the way. During your service, there are usually three general types of training events:
* Shortwave radio
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* Camera and film
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* Binoculars
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* Musical instruments (plus extra strings, reeds, etc.)
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* Sport, hobby, and art equipment and supplies
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* Games (e.g., cards, dice, hacky sack, yo-yos, Frisbee, juggling balls, dominoes)
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* Camping gear (tent, backpack, sleeping pad, etc.), if you are interested in camping
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* Books
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===Miscellaneous ===
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* In-service trainings: Provides opportunities to focus on relationship development with host families, agencies, and communities during the first two to six months of service. Host agencies and host families are invited to share their experiences, roles, and responsibilities and to troubleshoot any issues.  The focus is on finding creative solutions early in a Volunteer’s service, as Peace Corps/Micronesia recognizes that the first six months of service tend to be the most challenging.
 +
* Mid-service conference: Provides opportunities for Volunteers to review their first year, reassess their personal and project objectives, and plan for their second year of service.
 +
* Close-of-service conference: Provides opportunities for Volunteers to review their Peace Corps service and plan for closure to their Peace Corps experience, preparing Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service.  Training events are integrated and interrelated, from the predeparture orientation in the U.S. through the end of your service.  They are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.
  
* A small current converter (if you bring small appliances like a shaver, etc.)
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[[Category:Micronesia]]
* One set of sheets with pillowcase
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[[Category:Training|Micronesia]]
* English dictionary and/or thesaurus
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* Multi-purpose knife (e.g., Swiss Army knife, Leatherman or Gerber; a must for environment Volunteers)
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* Flashlight/headlamp and batteries (Note that AAA batteries are hard to come by 5
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* A small amount of seeds to plant, especially herbs for the garden
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* A solar battery charger and rechargeable batteries
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*      Solar bulbs or/and solar power panels. With a power panel you can charge your cell or any other low-voltage USB-port devices, such as IPod, Kindle, etc. All you need is sun, and that's plentiful. You may want to check the Nokero and Solio products. Peace Corps Volunteers get a 25%-50% discount on Nokero products when they join [http://www.marketforchange.com Market for Change]
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* Combination padlocks of various sizes (good key locks can be found in-country)
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* Sewing kit
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* Photos of your home and family (your neighbors will love them)
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* Sturdy water bottle (e.g., Nalgene)
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* Plastic egg carrier
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* Money belt (critical for traveling on public transport)
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* Travel alarm clock
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* Shoe waterproofing kit
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* Duct or packing tape
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* Day pack
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* Journal or diary
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* U.S. stamps (to send mail with people returning home)
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* Traveler’s checks for vacation travel
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* For education Volunteers, a couple of high-quality secondary-level textbooks (Peace Corps/Tanzania has a resource library, and you will get some books in training for basic needs, but we suggest that you leave some items with friends or family to send you after you have moved to your site)
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Special Considerations for Environmental Volunteers
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Women: Cut back on the number of skirts you bring. And remember that loose-fitting skirts are best because you will be jumping gullies and riding bikes in them. Cut back on blouses, too. Substitute one pair of pants with a pair of Capri pants.
+
 
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Men: Cut back on the number of pants. At most, bring three button-down shirts.
+
 
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[[Category:Tanzania]]
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Revision as of 08:36, 8 December 2015

Country Resources

When you first join us in Pohnpei, the capital of the Federated States of Micronesia, you will participate in approximately nine weeks of pre-service training (PST). PST will help you to learn about your host country and island, learn about what it will be like to be a Peace Corps Volunteer in FSM/Palau, and learn about yourself.

The goals of Peace Corps/Micronesia’s training program are to give you a “jump start” in learning about the culture and language of your host island, to help prepare you for community entry into the community in which you will serve, and to train you to be an effective observer/cultural student. PST helps prepare Volunteers to be development facilitators who can help their community prioritize local needs and desires and help initiate efforts to address these needs. During PST, you will learn some skills that will help you begin to get comfortable in a classroom environment. You will be introduced to the concepts of capacity building and sustainable development; you will have the opportunity to learn about local organizations, institutions, and leaders; and you will start to meet community partners. The goal of pre-service training is to help you successfully start a learning process that will continue throughout your service as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Micronesia.

Pre-service training consists of two phases. Phase I is conducted in Pohnpei and lasts approximately two to three weeks. This phase focuses on administrative and medical needs, PACA (participatory analysis for community action) introduction, gender and diversity differences, and general skills. Site selection also occurs during Phase I, and trainees will learn which island and community they will serve. Phase II is community-based training that lasts about six weeks. This training is held in each of the FSM states/Palau where trainees will be serving, and focuses on language and cultural skills.

Throughout training and to encourage community integration, trainees spend as much time as possible in a rural community setting away from the town centers. Trainees will live with host families during both phases. They learn about the daily life of Micronesians—their customs, attitudes, beliefs, morals, values, worldview, language, diet, and more.

A set of Peace Corps training competencies (technical, behavioral, cross cultural, medical, safety, and language) will drive activities throughout pre-service training. Evaluations will be conducted during PST so that trainees have ample opportunity to self-assess and to get feedback from training staff. Informal feedback will be given on a daily basis.

Peace Corps/FSM/Palau staff members will do all that they can to give you opportunities to learn about Micronesian culture, attitudes, and worldview. They will work hard to help you immerse in an environment that helps you learn the basics you need to know to become a Peace Corps Volunteer. Ultimately, you will be in control of your learning and have the responsibility to make the most of the learning opportunities you will have.

It is a privilege to become a Peace Corps Volunteer. Trainees who successfully complete pre-service training and are recommended to be sworn-in as FSM/Palau Volunteers have earned this privilege through their perseverance, hard work, and patience.

Cross-Cultural Training

The richness and quality of your experience over the next two years as a Peace Corps Volunteer will depend largely on your ability to participate in the everyday life of your community and of Micronesia as a whole. This ability depends upon your understanding of and adaptation to the norms and customs of Micronesian society.

Like fluency in a language, fluency in a culture requires that the student understand the basic nature of cultures and how they are used, mastering some general rules of cultural “grammar” and a basic vocabulary. Pre-service training will give you opportunities to begin to become a student of Micronesian culture. As with language, however, fluency itself comes only with practice. Cultural “practice” takes place in Micronesian society, in the infinite variety of situations and settings that are there for you to discover. Your host family, your language and cross-cultural facilitator, your program assistant, and the contacts you make will be your most important sources of cross-cultural “conversation.” The more you make use of these helpful people, the more you will learn.

Throughout PST, cross-cultural training is also woven into training activities focused on technical, language, safety and security, and medical subjects. During Phase II, training is geared toward learning about the culture of your island of service to help improve your skills of perception, communication, and facilitation. Topics such as Micronesian community structure, family structure, gender and development, and traditional and political leadership structures are also addressed.

Language Training

The best way to integrate into another culture is through language. Knowledge of the local language will help you integrate into your community. As a Peace Corps Volunteer, you will find that language skills are key to personal and professional satisfaction during your service. Language study will thus occupy the largest segment of training time.

Although many Micronesians speak English and are willing and sometimes eager to speak with you, the extent to which you truly integrate and what activities you can actively participate in will be closely tied to your ability to speak the local language. As many as 18 languages are spoken throughout Micronesia, and Peace Corps/Micronesia provides training in as many as 11 of them. As a Peace Corps trainee, you will begin to study the language of your island of service. Micronesian instructors teach language classes with groups of three or four trainees.

In addition to time in class, you will be given assignments to work on outside of the classroom and with your host family. The goal is to get you to a point of basic social communication skills that you can continue to build on. Prior to your swearing-in as a Volunteer, you will work on strategies to continue language studies during your two years of service.

By the end of PST, trainees are expected to achieve a minimum of level of proficiency. You must successfully meet these minimum language requirements to complete training and become a Volunteer.

Technical Training

Technical training will help you better understand the education and development challenges in Micronesia today. Peace Corps/Micronesia focuses on introducing you to an array of local resources to use as well as experts with whom you may collaborate throughout your service. Training places great emphasis on learning how to identify the needs of the community in which you will live and work, transferring skills you have, and helping your community identify resources to meet its needs.

By the end of training, trainees should have a basic understanding of the education and youth context, methods for investigating and analyzing community interests, teaching English as a second language (TESL) teaching techniques, and educator resources, including tools and manuals.

Goals for Peace Corps/Micronesia’s TESL & education for community development projects will be reviewed. You will learn about PACA, which is a set of tools to analyze community activities and priorities. You will learn about how Micronesian communities make decisions. And you will learn techniques that will help you be successful in the classroom.

Health Training

During pre-service training, you will be given basic medical training and information. You will be expected to practice preventive healthcare and to take responsibility for your own health by adhering to all medical policies. Trainees are required to attend all medical sessions. The topics include preventive health measures and minor and major medical issues that you might encounter while in Micronesia. Nutrition, mental health, safety and security, setting up a safe living environment, and how to avoid HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are also discussed.

Safety Training

During the safety training sessions, you will learn how to adopt a lifestyle that reduces risk in your home, at work, and during your travels. You will also learn appropriate, effective strategies for coping with unwanted attention and about your individual responsibility for promoting safety throughout your service.

Additional Trainings during Volunteer Service

Peace Corps/Micronesia’s training program aims to provide trainees and Volunteers with ongoing opportunities to continue their learning and development, to share their successes and challenges, and to develop strategies for working through the inevitable bumps that will occur along the way. During your service, there are usually three general types of training events:

  • In-service trainings: Provides opportunities to focus on relationship development with host families, agencies, and communities during the first two to six months of service. Host agencies and host families are invited to share their experiences, roles, and responsibilities and to troubleshoot any issues. The focus is on finding creative solutions early in a Volunteer’s service, as Peace Corps/Micronesia recognizes that the first six months of service tend to be the most challenging.
  • Mid-service conference: Provides opportunities for Volunteers to review their first year, reassess their personal and project objectives, and plan for their second year of service.
  • Close-of-service conference: Provides opportunities for Volunteers to review their Peace Corps service and plan for closure to their Peace Corps experience, preparing Volunteers for the future after Peace Corps service. Training events are integrated and interrelated, from the predeparture orientation in the U.S. through the end of your service. They are planned, implemented, and evaluated cooperatively by the training staff, Peace Corps staff, and Volunteers.