Difference between pages "Panama" and "Armenia"

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Volunteers work in a variety of rural and urban community development projects. More than 400 Volunteers have worked in Panama in community economic development, community environmental education, environmental health, ecotourism, and agroforestry.
+
Peace Corps Volunteers assist the government of Armenia in an effort to address multiple development challenges. Currently, the Peace Corps places its emphasis on sustainable capacity-building projects in the areas of Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) and Community and Business Development (CBD). The environmental education (EE) and community health education (CHE) programs have been closed as of September 2010. The objective is not to teach Armenians “American” values, but to help them help themselves within their own cultural framework.
  
The Peace Corps program in Panama contributes to improvements in the quality of life of low-income families and environmental conditions by promoting environmental education in primary and junior high schools, introducing sustainable agriculture techniques to rural farmers, and working with coastal fishermen and indigenous communities on marine resource conservation and waste management. Additionally, Volunteers work with youth, women, and rural and indigenous community organizations to develop income-generating activities and small business skills through agribusinesses and ecotourism.
 
  
Peace Corps Volunteers are also significantly engaged in a variety of cross-cultural exchanges that are promoting a better understanding of both the American and Panamanian culture. Peace Corps Volunteers learn about the predominantly Caribbean-Spanish culture and customs of Panama and, in addition to learning Spanish, Volunteers learn various indigenous languages.
+
== Peace Corps History==
  
 +
''Main article: [[History of Peace Corps in Armenia]]''
  
==Peace Corps History==
+
The Peace Corps program in Armenia began in 1992.  During the first years, conditions were very difficult, with no electricity or heat. The country was reeling from the aftermath of the devastating 1988 earthquake, the breakup of the Soviet Union, and a war with Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh, an Armenian enclave. Since then, more than 500 Volunteers have served in Armenia.
  
''Main article: [[History of the Peace Corps in Senegal]]''
 
 
The Peace Corps has a long history in Panama. The first Volunteers began work in 1963 and continued serving in Panama until May 1971. In February 1990, the Panamanian government asked the Peace Corps to return, and the program has continued without interruption ever since.
 
 
The central goal of Peace Corps/Panama is to promote sustainable community development, in partnership with Panamanian agencies and NGOs, in Panama’s poorest and most disenfranchised regions. Each project has sector-specific goals related to this commitment.
 
 
With the reversion of the Panama Canal to Panama in 1999, the country is at a critical juncture in its history. For the first time in many decades, there is no American military presence. The economy, when not in recession, is generally weak with growing unemployment. The areas most affected by these economic woes are rural and indigenous communities, and this is where you will find Peace Corps Volunteers working. Volunteers work with communities and agency/NGO partners to meet the challenges of poverty. By helping communities gain access to resources and helping agencies locate communities in need, Volunteers facilitate a more efficient allocation of resources and help establish links between the communities and agencies that can last well after the Volunteers have left.
 
  
  
 
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
 
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
  
''Main article: [[Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles in Panama]]''
+
''Main article: [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in Armenia]]''
 
+
[[Image:Small.hut.panama.JPG|thumb|250px|right|A small hut surrounded by a rice field in the province of Herrera in Panama.]]
+
 
+
The small and medium-sized communities (populations of 300 to 10,000) in which Volunteers live and work are located 1 to 16 hours from Panama City. Like most Panamanians, Volunteers live in simple concrete-block houses with cement floors and corrugated tin roofs or wooden huts with dirt floors and palm thatch roofs, depending on the location of their site. Since living with a family provides special insight into Panamanian culture, improves language skills, and facilitates integration into the community, you must live with a host family during training and your first three months at your site. After that, you may choose to live alone.
+
  
Indigenous communities generally have the most rustic living conditions, and they can be remote. Sometimes getting to a community may require at least a two-hour walk or a ride in a dugout canoe. Most houses in urban and highly populated areas have running water inside or outside the house. In some cases, it is necessary to boil water and add chlorine to make it safe to drink. In some rural sites, and in many indigenous communities, water must be obtained from springs or streams. Many homes have a simple pit latrine, but latrine construction is often one of a Volunteer’s first activities. Electricity also varies depending on the site. You must be flexible in your housing and site expectations and willing to adapt to the discomforts that come with rural living.
+
During pre-service training, all trainees are required to live with host families. After completing pre-service training and swearing-in, all Volunteers live with host families for a minimum of four months at their permanent site. Living with a host family provides several benefits including accelerated language acquisition; a deeper and more profound cross-cultural understanding; and an improved, in-depth community integration. Being a respected and equal member of a family not only provides strong personal and professional rewards, it can ensure your safety and security as well. Host family accommodations will vary depending on the community. Some may be apartments or separate detached houses; some may have European-style bathrooms while others might use "outhouses" or "squat" toilets. Regardless of the situation, trainees and Volunteers live as the members of their community do. After the four-month period, Volunteers may remain with host families or change to another living situation in their communities depending on availability and personal preferences.
  
 
==Training==
 
==Training==
  
''Main article: [[Training in Panama]]''
+
''Main article: [[Training in Armenia]]''
  
An experienced staff of language, technical, and cross-cultural trainers and administrative support personnel will do their best to help you obtain the skills and knowledge necessary to have an enjoyable and productive two years of service as a Volunteer working in sustainable community development. They will design and conduct your training based on the specific projects you will be working on.
+
Training is an essential part of Peace Corps service. The goal of the nine-week program is to give you the skills and information you need to live and work effectively in Armenia. In doing that, we build upon the experiences and expertise you bring to the Peace Corps. The program also gives you the opportunity to practice new skills as they apply to your work in Armenia. We anticipate that you will approach training with an open mind, a desire to learn, and a willingness to become involved. Trainees officially become Volunteers only after successful completion of training.
 
+
The 10-week training program will take place in small communities within an hour of Panama City. The average week will be packed into 48 hours, divided among development of language and technical skills; work orientation; and a segment called “common areas training,” which incorporates Panamanian culture and history, Volunteer life, personal safety, strategic planning, diversity and gender issues, and other topics related to Volunteer service.
+
 
+
While Peace Corps staff will help prepare you for service, the primary responsibility for becoming prepared resides with you. What you get out of training will depend primarily on your level of interest, enthusiasm, and participation. Come prepared to work hard.
+
 
+
The training staff eagerly awaits your arrival. The training director will contact you a few weeks prior to your departure to welcome you.  
+
  
 +
You will receive training and orientation in components of language, cross-cultural communication, development issues, health and personal safety, and technical skills pertinent to your specific assignment. The skills you learn will serve as the foundation upon which you build your experience as a Peace Corps Volunteer.
  
 +
Upon arrival in Armenia, you will go to the Peace Corps training center a few hours outside of Yerevan. After a brief orientation period, you will move into a host village within an hour of the training center. In the host village, you and other trainees (about 8 to a village) will live with a Armenian host family for the majority of your training period, allowing you to gain hands-on experience in some of the new skills you are expected to acquire.
  
 
==Health Care and Safety==
 
==Health Care and Safety==
  
''Main article: [[Health Care and Safety in Panama]]''
+
''Main article: [[Health care and safety in Armenia]]''
 
+
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. Peace Corps/Panama maintains a health office with a full-time nurse, a part-time physician, and a medical assistant, who take care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are also available in Panama at local, American-standard hospitals. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported either to an appropriate medical facility in the region or to the United States.
+
  
 +
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. The Peace Corps in Armenia maintains a clinic with two full-time medical officers, who take care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are also available in Armenia at local hospitals and clinics. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported to a medical facility in the region or to the United States.
  
 
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
 
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
  
''Main article: [[Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues in Panama]]''
+
''Main article: [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Armenia]]''
  
In Panama, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Panama.
+
In Armenia, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Armenia.
  
Outside of Panama City, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Panama are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.  
+
Outside of Armenia’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and Caucasian. The people of Armenia are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.  
  
 
* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
 
* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
 +
* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
 
* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
 
* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
 
* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
* Possible issues for Married Volunteers
 
 
 
  
 
==Frequently Asked Questions==
 
==Frequently Asked Questions==
  
 
{{Volunteersurvey2008
 
{{Volunteersurvey2008
|H1r= 14
+
|H1r= 17
|H1s= 77
+
|H1s= 76.3
|H2r= 9
+
|H2r= 25
|H2s= 88.8
+
|H2s= 85.3
|H3r= 10
+
|H3r= 14
|H3s= 88.8
+
|H3s= 87.8
|H4r= 14
+
|H4r= 46
|H4s= 110.5
+
|H4s= 103.0
|H5r= 5
+
|H5r= 30
|H5s= 61.1
+
|H5s= 54.0
|H6r= 17
+
|H6r= 44
|H6s= 92.7
+
|H6s= 79.1
 
}}
 
}}
  
''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Panama]]''
+
''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Armenia]]''
  
* How much luggage will I be allowed to bring to Panama?
+
* How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Armenia?
* What is the electric current in Panama?
+
* What is the electric current in Armenia?
 
* How much money should I bring?
 
* How much money should I bring?
 
* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
 
* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
 
* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
 
* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
 
* Do I need an international driver’s license?
 
* Do I need an international driver’s license?
 +
* What should I bring as gifts for Armenian friends and my host family?
 
* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
 
* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
 
* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
 
* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
* Can I call home from Panama?
+
* Can I call home from Armenia?
 
* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
 
* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
* Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?
 
 
  
 
==Packing List==
 
==Packing List==
  
''Main article: [[Packing List for Panama]]''
+
''Main article: [[Packing list for Armenia]]''
 
+
This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Panama and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. We recommend that you pack light. You can get virtually anything you might need in Panama. You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. Also, as you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight limit on baggage. And, a final suggestion: If in doubt, leave it out.
+
 
+
For luggage in general, duffel bags and backpacks are much more practical than suitcases. Rolling suitcases especially are not practical for Panama. Be sure to put the following items in a carry-on bag for quick and easy access once you arrive in Panama: passport, baggage-claim tickets, customs forms, World Health Organization card, and immunization records.
+
 
+
Because of the heat and humidity, cotton fabric is always a good idea, especially for underwear. Outdoor clothing with fabric that “wicks away” moisture can be useful, but cotton-synthetic blends also hold their shape and are cooler to wear. Clothing will probably be subject to harsh washing (many Volunteers wash their clothes on rocks) and rugged work and climatic conditions, so be sure to select durable items. Do not bring clothes made of delicate materials.
+
 
+
 
+
==Volunteer Sectors==
+
  
'''Sustainable Agriculture Systems (SAS)''' - Provides technical assistance to small farmers in high production, low-impact organic farming techniques.
+
This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Armenia and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage. Do not bring valuables or cherished items that could be lost, stolen, or ruined by the harsh climate. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Armenia.
  
'''Community Environmental Conservation (CEC)''' - Works with youth and communities on the management of watersheds, protected areas, solid waste and ecotourism development.
+
* General
 +
* Packing for training
 +
* Clothing
 +
* Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
 +
* Kitchen
 +
* Additional Items to Consider Bringing
 +
* Items You Do Not Need to Bring
  
'''Community Economic Development (CED)''' - Supports community based cooperative development, tourism, youth and technology initiatives.
 
  
'''Environmental Health (EH)''' - Volunteers train local groups to operate, maintain and manage community water, sanitation and health systems.
+
== Volunteer Projects ==
  
'''Tourism and English Advising (TEA)''' - Improves rural communities capacity to benefit from Panama’s fastest growing industry, tourism, by means of organizing tourism committees and educating youth in the English language.
+
''Main article: [[Volunteer projects of Peace Corps in Armenia]]''
  
==Current Volunteer Projects==
+
Peace Corps Volunteers in Armenia have initiated many projects in Peace Corps and some have started websites to promote these projects in Armenia and abroad. Some RPCVs have started American nonprofits to provide continued support to the projects they initiated during their Peace Corps service.
[http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/Seeders_Program Seeders]
+
  
 
==Peace Corps News==
 
==Peace Corps News==
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Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
 
Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
  
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22panama%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
+
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22armenia%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
  
<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/pm/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
+
<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off number=10>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/am/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
  
 
==Country Fund==
 
==Country Fund==
  
Contributions to the [https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.donors.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=525-CFD Panama Country Fund] will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Panama. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.
+
Contributions to the [https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.donors.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=305-CFD Armenia Country Fund] will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Armenia. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.
  
 
==See also==
 
==See also==
* [[Volunteers who served in Panama]]
+
* [[Armenian]]
* [[Peace Corps Panama Friends]]
+
* [[Volunteers who served in Armenia]]
 +
* [[Staff members who served in Armenia]]
 +
* [[Armenia books]]
 +
* [[Armenia web resources]]
 
* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
 
* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
* [[List of resources for Panama]]
 
 
* [[Inspector General Reports]]
 
* [[Inspector General Reports]]
 +
* [[Treaties for Peace Corps by US State Department]]
  
==External links==
 
* [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/pm.html Peace Corps Journals - Panama]
 
  
[[Category:Panama]] [[Category:Central America and Mexico]]
+
[[Category:Eastern Europe and Central Asia]]
 
[[Category:Country]]
 
[[Category:Country]]
[[Image:[[Image:Example.jpg]]]]
+
[[Category:Armenia]]
 +
[[Property::Located in::Eastern Europe and Central Asia]]

Latest revision as of 11:45, 22 May 2014

Peace Corps Volunteers assist the government of Armenia in an effort to address multiple development challenges. Currently, the Peace Corps places its emphasis on sustainable capacity-building projects in the areas of Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) and Community and Business Development (CBD). The environmental education (EE) and community health education (CHE) programs have been closed as of September 2010. The objective is not to teach Armenians “American” values, but to help them help themselves within their own cultural framework.


Peace Corps History[edit]

Main article: History of Peace Corps in Armenia

The Peace Corps program in Armenia began in 1992. During the first years, conditions were very difficult, with no electricity or heat. The country was reeling from the aftermath of the devastating 1988 earthquake, the breakup of the Soviet Union, and a war with Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh, an Armenian enclave. Since then, more than 500 Volunteers have served in Armenia.


Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle[edit]

Main article: Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in Armenia

During pre-service training, all trainees are required to live with host families. After completing pre-service training and swearing-in, all Volunteers live with host families for a minimum of four months at their permanent site. Living with a host family provides several benefits including accelerated language acquisition; a deeper and more profound cross-cultural understanding; and an improved, in-depth community integration. Being a respected and equal member of a family not only provides strong personal and professional rewards, it can ensure your safety and security as well. Host family accommodations will vary depending on the community. Some may be apartments or separate detached houses; some may have European-style bathrooms while others might use "outhouses" or "squat" toilets. Regardless of the situation, trainees and Volunteers live as the members of their community do. After the four-month period, Volunteers may remain with host families or change to another living situation in their communities depending on availability and personal preferences.

Training[edit]

Main article: Training in Armenia

Training is an essential part of Peace Corps service. The goal of the nine-week program is to give you the skills and information you need to live and work effectively in Armenia. In doing that, we build upon the experiences and expertise you bring to the Peace Corps. The program also gives you the opportunity to practice new skills as they apply to your work in Armenia. We anticipate that you will approach training with an open mind, a desire to learn, and a willingness to become involved. Trainees officially become Volunteers only after successful completion of training.

You will receive training and orientation in components of language, cross-cultural communication, development issues, health and personal safety, and technical skills pertinent to your specific assignment. The skills you learn will serve as the foundation upon which you build your experience as a Peace Corps Volunteer.

Upon arrival in Armenia, you will go to the Peace Corps training center a few hours outside of Yerevan. After a brief orientation period, you will move into a host village within an hour of the training center. In the host village, you and other trainees (about 8 to a village) will live with a Armenian host family for the majority of your training period, allowing you to gain hands-on experience in some of the new skills you are expected to acquire.

Health Care and Safety[edit]

Main article: Health care and safety in Armenia

The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. The Peace Corps in Armenia maintains a clinic with two full-time medical officers, who take care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are also available in Armenia at local hospitals and clinics. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported to a medical facility in the region or to the United States.

Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues[edit]

Main article: Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Armenia

In Armenia, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Armenia.

Outside of Armenia’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and Caucasian. The people of Armenia are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.

  • Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
  • Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
  • Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities

Frequently Asked Questions[edit]

Armenia
2008 Volunteer Survey Results

How personally rewarding is your overall Peace Corps service?|}} Rank:
2008 H1r::17|}}
Score:
2008 H1s::76.3|}}
Today would you make the same decision to join the Peace Corps?|}} Rank:
2008 H2r::25|}}
Score:
2008 H2s::85.3|}}
Would you recommend Peace Corps service to others you think are qualified?|}} Rank:
2008 H3r::14|}}
Score:
2008 H3s::87.8|}}
Do you intend to complete your Peace Corps service?|}} Rank:
2008 H4r::46|}}
Score:
2008 H4s::103.0|}}
How well do your Peace Corps experiences match the expectations you had before you became a Volunteer?|}} Rank:
2008 H5r::30|}}
Score:
2008 H5s::54.0|}}
Would your host country benefit the most if the Peace Corps program were---?|}} Rank:
2008 H6r::44|}}
Score:
2008 H6s::79.1|}}
2008BVS::Armenia


Main article: FAQs about Peace Corps in Armenia

  • How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Armenia?
  • What is the electric current in Armenia?
  • How much money should I bring?
  • When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
  • Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
  • Do I need an international driver’s license?
  • What should I bring as gifts for Armenian friends and my host family?
  • Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
  • How can my family contact me in an emergency?
  • Can I call home from Armenia?
  • Should I bring a cellular phone with me?

Packing List[edit]

Main article: Packing list for Armenia

This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Armenia and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage. Do not bring valuables or cherished items that could be lost, stolen, or ruined by the harsh climate. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Armenia.

  • General
  • Packing for training
  • Clothing
  • Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
  • Kitchen
  • Additional Items to Consider Bringing
  • Items You Do Not Need to Bring


Volunteer Projects[edit]

Main article: Volunteer projects of Peace Corps in Armenia

Peace Corps Volunteers in Armenia have initiated many projects in Peace Corps and some have started websites to promote these projects in Armenia and abroad. Some RPCVs have started American nonprofits to provide continued support to the projects they initiated during their Peace Corps service.

Peace Corps News[edit]

Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by country of service or your home state

The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.
<rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22armenia%22&output=rss%7Ccharset=UTF-8%7Cshort%7Cdate=M d</rss>


PEACE CORPS JOURNALS
( As of Tuesday September 30, 2014 )<rss title=off desc=off number=10>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/am/blog/50.xml%7Ccharset=UTF-8%7Cshort%7Cmax=10</rss>

Country Fund[edit]

Contributions to the Armenia Country Fund will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Armenia. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.

See also[edit]