Difference between pages "Armenia" and "Azerbaijan"

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Peace Corps Volunteers assist the government of Armenia in an effort to address multiple development challenges. Currently, the Peace Corps places its emphasis on sustainable capacity-building projects in the areas of Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) and Community and Business Development (CBD). The environmental education (EE) and community health education (CHE) programs have been closed as of September 2010. The objective is not to teach Armenians “American” values, but to help them help themselves within their own cultural framework.
+
The government of Azerbaijan invited Peace Corps to work in the country, beginning with a project in the education sector in 2003. The Azerbaijan Ministry of Education (MOE) and the Peace Corps work together at the community level to improve the teaching of English as a foreign language (TEFL) programs at schools and universities. The post launched its second project, the Community Economic Development (CED) project, in 2005. The first Youth Development ( YD) Volunteers swore in with AZ5 in September 2007.
  
  
== Peace Corps History==
+
==Peace Corps History==
  
''Main article: [[History of Peace Corps in Armenia]]''
+
''Main article: [[History of the Peace Corps in Azerbaijan]]''
  
The Peace Corps program in Armenia began in 1992. During the first years, conditions were very difficult, with no electricity or heat. The country was reeling from the aftermath of the devastating 1988 earthquake, the breakup of the Soviet Union, and a war with Azerbaijan over Nagorno-Karabakh, an Armenian enclave. Since then, more than 500 Volunteers have served in Armenia.
+
The government of Azerbaijan has expressed keen interest in having a Peace Corps program since 1997. However, because of intense lobbying efforts by anti-Azerbaijani Armenian-Americans, the Freedom Support Act of 1992 contained a special provision (Section 907) that banned U.S. foreign assistance to Azerbaijan without presidential approval. This act effectively blocked any initiative by the Peace Corps until 2002, when President George W. Bush lifted the provision.
 +
[http://www.awanirentcar.com/pricelist Sewa mobil jakarta] | [http://www.grosir-kosmetik.com/62-glutera.html Glutera] | [http://www.raywhitesemarang.com/ rumah dijual semarang] | [http://www.morinfoods.com/selai-kacang.html selai kacang]
  
 +
Shortly thereafter, Vilayat Guliev, minister of foreign affairs for the government of Azerbaijan, formally requested a Peace Corps presence. This was strongly supported by the U.S. embassy staff in Baku (Azerbaijan’s capital), and in April 2002, the Peace Corps began an assessment. The assessment team declared Azerbaijan “highly suitable for a new Peace Corps program,” citing the enthusiastic support of the U.S. embassy, Azerbaijani ministry officials, local government officials, Azerbaijani students and teachers, and local and international <span class="plainlinks">[http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/Raymond_Moy nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). On the strength of this assessment and the U.S. president’s declared interest in increasing the size of the Peace Corps and enabling citizens in predominantly Muslim countries to interact with Americans, the Peace Corps director approved the establishment of a program in Azerbaijan for 2003.
  
  
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
+
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles==
  
''Main article: [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in Armenia]]''
+
''Main article: [[Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles in Azerbaijan]]''
  
During pre-service training, all trainees are required to live with host families. After completing pre-service training and swearing-in, all Volunteers live with host families for a minimum of four months at their permanent site. Living with a host family provides several benefits including accelerated language acquisition; a deeper and more profound cross-cultural understanding; and an improved, in-depth community integration. Being a respected and equal member of a family not only provides strong personal and professional rewards, it can ensure your safety and security as well. Host family accommodations will vary depending on the community. Some may be apartments or separate detached houses; some may have European-style bathrooms while others might use "outhouses" or "squat" toilets. Regardless of the situation, trainees and Volunteers live as the members of their community do. After the four-month period, Volunteers may remain with host families or change to another living situation in their communities depending on availability and personal preferences.
+
As a Volunteer, you will live in a town or village outside of Baku. Peace Corps/Azerbaijan staff, with some consideration of your desires, selects your site carefully, its principal considerations being safety and security and matching the needs of the local community with your skills and aptitudes. We want to ensure that your talents are as fully engaged during your tour of service as possible.
 +
 
 +
Your housing might be a private room in a family’s dwelling, a shared house, or a small apartment. You will live with a host family during training as part of your language and cultural orientation. Upon being sworn in as a Volunteer, you will again live with an Azerbaijani host family in your assigned community for the first four months of your service. The Peace Corps will select your host family for this period. Just as we make every effort to select sites that will fully engage you, we expect that you will make every effort to absorb Azerbaijani culture by spending at four months of your service living directly with a host country family. After this four-month period, alternative housing arrangements may be considered in consultation with your program manager and the medical officer. Most volunteers would like to live on their own, and usually do so, but some Volunteers remain in host family housing for their entire service. In Azerbaijan, appropriate independent housing is scarce; you should prepare for the possibility of living with a host family for your entire service.
  
 
==Training==
 
==Training==
  
''Main article: [[Training in Armenia]]''
+
''Main article: [[Training in Azerbaijan]]''
  
Training is an essential part of Peace Corps service. The goal of the nine-week program is to give you the skills and information you need to live and work effectively in Armenia. In doing that, we build upon the experiences and expertise you bring to the Peace Corps. The program also gives you the opportunity to practice new skills as they apply to your work in Armenia. We anticipate that you will approach training with an open mind, a desire to learn, and a willingness to become involved. Trainees officially become Volunteers only after successful completion of training.
+
Following a brief pre-departure orientation (staging) in the United States, you will participate in an intensive 11-week pre-service training program in Azerbaijan. Peace Corps/ Azerbaijan uses a community-based training model that is designed around real-life experiences and emphasizes community involvement. Trainees live with host families in one of several training villages around a central training facility outside the capital. The goals of community-based training are: (1) to provide experiential learning in settings similar to those at Volunteer sites; (2) to give trainees the best possible opportunity to gain competence in technical, cross-cultural, language, and health and safety areas in a culturally and linguistically appropriate context; and (3) to guide trainees in self-directed learning so they can continue independent learning at their site.
  
You will receive training and orientation in components of language, cross-cultural communication, development issues, health and personal safety, and technical skills pertinent to your specific assignment. The skills you learn will serve as the foundation upon which you build your experience as a Peace Corps Volunteer.
+
Pre-service training contains six main training components: technical, Azerbaijani language, cross-cultural, health, and safety, and the opportunity to visit your potential site. Most of pre-service training time is spent on the first three of these components.
  
Upon arrival in Armenia, you will go to the Peace Corps training center a few hours outside of Yerevan. After a brief orientation period, you will move into a host village within an hour of the training center. In the host village, you and other trainees (about 8 to a village) will live with a Armenian host family for the majority of your training period, allowing you to gain hands-on experience in some of the new skills you are expected to acquire.
+
==Your Health Care and Safety in Azerbaijan==
  
==Health Care and Safety==
+
''Main article: [[Health Care and Safety in Azerbaijan]]''
  
''Main article: [[Health care and safety in Armenia]]''
+
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. The Peace Corps in Azerbaijan maintains a clinic with one or two (depending on the number of Volunteers) medical officers, who take care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are available in Baku at an American-standard hospital. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported either to an American-standard medical facility in the region or to the United States.
  
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. The Peace Corps in Armenia maintains a clinic with two full-time medical officers, who take care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are also available in Armenia at local hospitals and clinics. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported to a medical facility in the region or to the United States.
 
  
 
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
 
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
  
''Main article: [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Armenia]]''
+
''Main article: [[Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues in Azerbaijan]]''
  
In Armenia, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Armenia.
+
Our diversity helps us accomplish that goal. In other ways, however, it poses challenges. In Azerbaijan, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Azerbaijan.
  
Outside of Armenia’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and Caucasian. The people of Armenia are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.  
+
Outside of Azerbaijan’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Azerbaijan are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.  
  
 
* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
 
* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
 
 
* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
 +
* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
 
* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
 
* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
 
* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
 
* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
 +
* Possible Issues for Married Volunteers
  
==Frequently Asked Questions==
+
 
 +
==Frequently Asked questions==
  
 
{{Volunteersurvey2008
 
{{Volunteersurvey2008
|H1r= 17
+
|H1r= 42
|H1s= 76.3
+
|H1s= 71.5
|H2r= 25
+
|H2r= 25
|H2s= 85.3
+
|H2s= 85.3
|H3r= 14
+
|H3r= 43
|H3s= 87.8
+
|H3s= 82.9
|H4r= 46
+
|H4r= 41
|H4s= 103.0
+
|H4s= 103.5
|H5r= 30
+
|H5r= 39
|H5s= 54.0
+
|H5s= 52.5
|H6r= 44
+
|H6r= 9
|H6s= 79.1
+
|H6s= 98.3
 
}}
 
}}
  
''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Armenia]]''
+
''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Azerbaijan]]''
  
* How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Armenia?
+
* How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Azerbaijan?
* What is the electric current in Armenia?
+
* What is the electric current?
 
* How much money should I bring?
 
* How much money should I bring?
 
* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
 
* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
 
* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
 
* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
 
* Do I need an international driver’s license?
 
* Do I need an international driver’s license?
* What should I bring as gifts for Armenian friends and my host family?
+
* What should I bring as gifts for Azerbaijani friends and my host family?
 
* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
 
* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
 
* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
 
* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
* Can I call home from Armenia?
+
* Can I call home?
* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
+
* Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?
 +
 
  
 
==Packing List==
 
==Packing List==
  
''Main article: [[Packing list for Armenia]]''
+
''Main article: [[Packing List for Azerbaijan]]''
  
This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Armenia and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight restriction on baggage. Do not bring valuables or cherished items that could be lost, stolen, or ruined by the harsh climate. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Armenia.
+
This list has been compiled by Peace Corps/Azerbaijan and Volunteers and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have a weight limit on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Azerbaijan.
  
* General
+
* General Clothing
* Packing for training
+
* For Women
* Clothing
+
* For Men
 
* Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
 
* Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
* Kitchen
 
* Additional Items to Consider Bringing
 
* Items You Do Not Need to Bring
 
 
 
== Volunteer Projects ==
 
 
''Main article: [[Volunteer projects of Peace Corps in Armenia]]''
 
 
Peace Corps Volunteers in Armenia have initiated many projects in Peace Corps and some have started websites to promote these projects in Armenia and abroad. Some RPCVs have started American nonprofits to provide continued support to the projects they initiated during their Peace Corps service.
 
  
 
==Peace Corps News==
 
==Peace Corps News==
Line 104: Line 100:
 
Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
 
Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
  
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22armenia%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
+
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22azerbaijan%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
  
<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off number=10>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/am/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
+
<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/aj/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
  
 
==Country Fund==
 
==Country Fund==
  
Contributions to the [https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.donors.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=305-CFD Armenia Country Fund] will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Armenia. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.
+
Contributions to the [https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.donors.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=314-CFD Azerbaijan Country Fund] will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Azerbaijan. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.
  
 
==See also==
 
==See also==
* [[Armenian]]
+
* [[List of resources for Azerbaijan]]
* [[Volunteers who served in Armenia]]
+
* [[Volunteers who served in Azerbaijan]]
* [[Staff members who served in Armenia]]
+
* [[Armenia books]]
+
* [[Armenia web resources]]
+
 
* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
 
* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
 
* [[Inspector General Reports]]
 
* [[Inspector General Reports]]
* [[Treaties for Peace Corps by US State Department]]
 
  
  
[[Category:Eastern Europe and Central Asia]]
+
 
 +
==External links==
 +
* [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/aj.html Peace Corps Journals - Azerbaijan]
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Azerbaijan]] [[Category:Eastern Europe and Central Asia]]
 
[[Category:Country]]
 
[[Category:Country]]
[[Category:Armenia]]
 
[[Property::Located in::Eastern Europe and Central Asia]]
 

Latest revision as of 11:46, 22 May 2014

The government of Azerbaijan invited Peace Corps to work in the country, beginning with a project in the education sector in 2003. The Azerbaijan Ministry of Education (MOE) and the Peace Corps work together at the community level to improve the teaching of English as a foreign language (TEFL) programs at schools and universities. The post launched its second project, the Community Economic Development (CED) project, in 2005. The first Youth Development ( YD) Volunteers swore in with AZ5 in September 2007.


Peace Corps History[edit]

Main article: History of the Peace Corps in Azerbaijan

The government of Azerbaijan has expressed keen interest in having a Peace Corps program since 1997. However, because of intense lobbying efforts by anti-Azerbaijani Armenian-Americans, the Freedom Support Act of 1992 contained a special provision (Section 907) that banned U.S. foreign assistance to Azerbaijan without presidential approval. This act effectively blocked any initiative by the Peace Corps until 2002, when President George W. Bush lifted the provision. Sewa mobil jakarta | Glutera | rumah dijual semarang | selai kacang

Shortly thereafter, Vilayat Guliev, minister of foreign affairs for the government of Azerbaijan, formally requested a Peace Corps presence. This was strongly supported by the U.S. embassy staff in Baku (Azerbaijan’s capital), and in April 2002, the Peace Corps began an assessment. The assessment team declared Azerbaijan “highly suitable for a new Peace Corps program,” citing the enthusiastic support of the U.S. embassy, Azerbaijani ministry officials, local government officials, Azerbaijani students and teachers, and local and international [http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/Raymond_Moy nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). On the strength of this assessment and the U.S. president’s declared interest in increasing the size of the Peace Corps and enabling citizens in predominantly Muslim countries to interact with Americans, the Peace Corps director approved the establishment of a program in Azerbaijan for 2003.


Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles[edit]

Main article: Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyles in Azerbaijan

As a Volunteer, you will live in a town or village outside of Baku. Peace Corps/Azerbaijan staff, with some consideration of your desires, selects your site carefully, its principal considerations being safety and security and matching the needs of the local community with your skills and aptitudes. We want to ensure that your talents are as fully engaged during your tour of service as possible.

Your housing might be a private room in a family’s dwelling, a shared house, or a small apartment. You will live with a host family during training as part of your language and cultural orientation. Upon being sworn in as a Volunteer, you will again live with an Azerbaijani host family in your assigned community for the first four months of your service. The Peace Corps will select your host family for this period. Just as we make every effort to select sites that will fully engage you, we expect that you will make every effort to absorb Azerbaijani culture by spending at four months of your service living directly with a host country family. After this four-month period, alternative housing arrangements may be considered in consultation with your program manager and the medical officer. Most volunteers would like to live on their own, and usually do so, but some Volunteers remain in host family housing for their entire service. In Azerbaijan, appropriate independent housing is scarce; you should prepare for the possibility of living with a host family for your entire service.

Training[edit]

Main article: Training in Azerbaijan

Following a brief pre-departure orientation (staging) in the United States, you will participate in an intensive 11-week pre-service training program in Azerbaijan. Peace Corps/ Azerbaijan uses a community-based training model that is designed around real-life experiences and emphasizes community involvement. Trainees live with host families in one of several training villages around a central training facility outside the capital. The goals of community-based training are: (1) to provide experiential learning in settings similar to those at Volunteer sites; (2) to give trainees the best possible opportunity to gain competence in technical, cross-cultural, language, and health and safety areas in a culturally and linguistically appropriate context; and (3) to guide trainees in self-directed learning so they can continue independent learning at their site.

Pre-service training contains six main training components: technical, Azerbaijani language, cross-cultural, health, and safety, and the opportunity to visit your potential site. Most of pre-service training time is spent on the first three of these components.

Your Health Care and Safety in Azerbaijan[edit]

Main article: Health Care and Safety in Azerbaijan

The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. The Peace Corps in Azerbaijan maintains a clinic with one or two (depending on the number of Volunteers) medical officers, who take care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are available in Baku at an American-standard hospital. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported either to an American-standard medical facility in the region or to the United States.


Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues[edit]

Main article: Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues in Azerbaijan

Our diversity helps us accomplish that goal. In other ways, however, it poses challenges. In Azerbaijan, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Azerbaijan.

Outside of Azerbaijan’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Azerbaijan are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to cultural differences that you present.

  • Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
  • Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
  • Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
  • Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
  • Possible Issues for Married Volunteers


Frequently Asked questions[edit]

Azerbaijan
2008 Volunteer Survey Results

How personally rewarding is your overall Peace Corps service?|}} Rank:
2008 H1r::42|}}
Score:
2008 H1s::71.5|}}
Today would you make the same decision to join the Peace Corps?|}} Rank:
2008 H2r::25|}}
Score:
2008 H2s::85.3|}}
Would you recommend Peace Corps service to others you think are qualified?|}} Rank:
2008 H3r::43|}}
Score:
2008 H3s::82.9|}}
Do you intend to complete your Peace Corps service?|}} Rank:
2008 H4r::41|}}
Score:
2008 H4s::103.5|}}
How well do your Peace Corps experiences match the expectations you had before you became a Volunteer?|}} Rank:
2008 H5r::39|}}
Score:
2008 H5s::52.5|}}
Would your host country benefit the most if the Peace Corps program were---?|}} Rank:
2008 H6r::9|}}
Score:
2008 H6s::98.3|}}
2008BVS::Azerbaijan


Main article: FAQs about Peace Corps in Azerbaijan

  • How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Azerbaijan?
  • What is the electric current?
  • How much money should I bring?
  • When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
  • Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
  • Do I need an international driver’s license?
  • What should I bring as gifts for Azerbaijani friends and my host family?
  • Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
  • How can my family contact me in an emergency?
  • Can I call home?
  • Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?


Packing List[edit]

Main article: Packing List for Azerbaijan

This list has been compiled by Peace Corps/Azerbaijan and Volunteers and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have a weight limit on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Azerbaijan.

  • General Clothing
  • For Women
  • For Men
  • Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items

Peace Corps News[edit]

Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by country of service or your home state

The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.
<rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22azerbaijan%22&output=rss%7Ccharset=UTF-8%7Cshort%7Cdate=M d</rss>


PEACE CORPS JOURNALS
( As of Friday July 25, 2014 )<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/aj/blog/50.xml%7Ccharset=UTF-8%7Cshort%7Cmax=10</rss>

Country Fund[edit]

Contributions to the Azerbaijan Country Fund will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Azerbaijan. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.

See also[edit]


External links[edit]