Difference between pages "1970s" and "Ceramic Stove Project"

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==Change and Ambition==
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{{Project
 +
|project=Ceramic Stove Project
 +
|projecttype=PCPP
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|site=Dominican Republic
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|country=Dominican_Republic
 +
|firstname=T
 +
|lastname=Rimmer
 +
|state=New_York
 +
|communityfunds=$3805.71
 +
|communitypercentage=48%
 +
|neededfunds=$2689.31
 +
|requestedfunds=$3989.31
 +
|projectnumber=517-294
 +
|projectyear=2009
 +
}}
  
For the Peace Corps, the 1970s are a time of change, far-ranging ambition, and specialized talent.
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Imagine you are living in a remote village on a secluded mountain road in the Dominican Republic. Your only source of food is what you grow on your own small plot of land. You and your family of five share a small, two room house made of wood. Every day you wake up at dawn to search for the firewood you will use for preparation of the day’s food. Once you have returned, your wife can begin to cook the meals for the day. She will spend the majority of the day cooking over one flame to prepare three meals for your family and some neighbors.
  
Despite budget constraints, by December of 1974, Volunteers are serving in 69 countries, the largest number to date. The Peace Corps is working with developing nations as never before to plan and select projects to meet their specific needs. More foreign nationals join the Peace Corps as administrators; by 1973, they comprise more than half of Peace Corps' overseas staff.
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This is a reality in a remote mountain community in the Dominican Republic. This project aims to build and maintain a new technology of cook stove in this community. The women of the house are currently using a three stone method of cooking meals. The current method has many negative side-effects, including poor health due to smoke inhalation, environmental degradation due to tree-cutting for fire wood, and an excess of time for food preparation which prevents women from participating in other familial and community activities.
  
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The stoves that we are proposing to build have proven beneficial in many similar communities in the Dominican Republic. The new stoves have a chimney to redirect airflow out of the cooking area, resulting in a reduced amount of smoke inhalation. They are designed to enclose flames and to direct airflow in a way that burns wood slower and hotter, decreasing the amount of wood necessary to prepare a meal. In addition, the new stoves are designed with three burners. This enables women to cook more items at one time, decreasing the amount of time spent cooking. The community has proposed to build 36 new stoves, and community members will contribute roughly 50 percent of the costs. Each family soliciting a stove is required to participate in a class on basic food health and nutrition, as well as a class on stove maintenance. This will ensure the sustainability of the project. In addition, any member of the community who participates in the construction of the new stoves can use the skills learned for future stove construction and masonry projects.
  
==The Multipler Effect==
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Note: This summary was provided by a Peace Corps Volunteer and the community administering this project.
 
 
Volunteers are more qualified than ever. Men and women with professional skills, such as doctors, engineers, and horticulturists, account for more than a fifth of the Volunteers. These Volunteers, Peace Corps officials believe, will have a significant "multiplier effect" - they will transfer their talents to host country nationals who will, in turn, share these skills with their fellow citizens.
 
 
 
As the Peace Corps becomes older, so do its Volunteers. The average age of a Volunteer reaches 27, and 5 percent of Volunteers are over 50 years old.
 
 
 
In July 1971, the Nixon Administration folds the Peace Corps and several other federal volunteer programs into a new federal volunteer agency called ACTION. In 1979, President Jimmy Carter signs an executive order that grants the Peace Corps full autonomy.  
 
 
 
At the close of the decade, more than 6,000 Volunteers are at work in the field and two returned Volunteers have been elected to the United States Senate: Paul Tsongas of Massachusetts, who served in Ethiopia from 1962-64; and Christopher Dodd of Connecticut, who was a Volunteer in the Dominican Republic from 1966-68.
 
 
==External Links==
 
[http://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=learn.whatispc.history.decades.1970 1970s] Official US Peace Corps Website
 
 
 
[[Category:Decades]]
 

Latest revision as of 12:16, 23 August 2016


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See Appropriate technology information on Ceramic Stove Project at:Ceramic Stove Project at Appropedia.
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Info about the Project was named::Ceramic Stove Project {{#if:Dominican_Republic||}} {{#if:|[[category:{{{country2}}}_projects]]|}} {{#if:2009||}} {{#if:2009||}} {{#if:Dominican Republic||}} {{#if:|[[category:{{{site2}}}]]|}} {{#if:|[[category:{{{site3}}}]]|}} {{#if:|[[category:{{{site4}}}]]|}} {{#if:|[[category:{{{affiliateorganization}}}]]|}} {{#if:PCPP||}} {{#if:|[[category:{{{projectsector}}}]]|}} {{#if:|[[category:{{{projectsector2}}}]]|}} {{#if:New_York||}} {{#if:New_York||}} {{#if:|[[category:{{{uscity}}}]]|}} {{#if:||}} {{#if:||}} {{#if:Rimmer||}}


Imagine you are living in a remote village on a secluded mountain road in the Dominican Republic. Your only source of food is what you grow on your own small plot of land. You and your family of five share a small, two room house made of wood. Every day you wake up at dawn to search for the firewood you will use for preparation of the day’s food. Once you have returned, your wife can begin to cook the meals for the day. She will spend the majority of the day cooking over one flame to prepare three meals for your family and some neighbors.

This is a reality in a remote mountain community in the Dominican Republic. This project aims to build and maintain a new technology of cook stove in this community. The women of the house are currently using a three stone method of cooking meals. The current method has many negative side-effects, including poor health due to smoke inhalation, environmental degradation due to tree-cutting for fire wood, and an excess of time for food preparation which prevents women from participating in other familial and community activities.

The stoves that we are proposing to build have proven beneficial in many similar communities in the Dominican Republic. The new stoves have a chimney to redirect airflow out of the cooking area, resulting in a reduced amount of smoke inhalation. They are designed to enclose flames and to direct airflow in a way that burns wood slower and hotter, decreasing the amount of wood necessary to prepare a meal. In addition, the new stoves are designed with three burners. This enables women to cook more items at one time, decreasing the amount of time spent cooking. The community has proposed to build 36 new stoves, and community members will contribute roughly 50 percent of the costs. Each family soliciting a stove is required to participate in a class on basic food health and nutrition, as well as a class on stove maintenance. This will ensure the sustainability of the project. In addition, any member of the community who participates in the construction of the new stoves can use the skills learned for future stove construction and masonry projects.

Note: This summary was provided by a Peace Corps Volunteer and the community administering this project.