Kenya

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{{CountryboxAlternative
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== About Us==
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|Countryname = Kenya
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|status = [[SUSPENDED]]
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|Map = Ke-map.gif
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|Welcomebooklink = http://www.peacecorps.gov/welcomebooks/kewb615.pdf
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|Region = [[Africa]]
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|CountryDirector = [[Kenneth Puvak]]
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|Sectors = [[Education]]<br> ([[APCD]]: [[Enos Radeny]])<br> [[Public Health]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[ Timothy Kibet]])<br> [[Health]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Anne Haviland]])<br>[[Small Business Development]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Louis  Othieno]])
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|ProgramDates = [[1964]] - [[Present]]
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|CurrentlyServing = 183
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|TotalVolunteers = 4810
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|Languages = [[Kalenjin]], [[Kikuyu]], [[Kiswahili]], [[Luo]], [[Luyha]]
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|Flag = Flag_of_Kenya.svg
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}}
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“Bringing the Experience Home”
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Since 1964, the Peace Corps has been assisting the government of Kenya in meeting its development needs by providing skilled Volunteers in a variety of disciplines. It is one of the largest Peace Corps programs in Africa.
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We are a volunteer-run organization representing the sizable community of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers and groupies who live and work in Washington, DC. We do this through three main activities.
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Peace Corps Volunteers support development in three key areas: small business development and information technology, education, and public health.
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1. Holding social events such as happy hours, parties, field trips, and other fun, interest-based activities. Any member may start a club and utilize our network to organize it.
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Peace Corps in Kenya has responded to the HIV/AIDS crisis by training every Volunteer in Kenya to help fight the spread of HIV/AIDS through education and awareness projects. Peace Corps.
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2. Helping local nonprofits engaged in community development meet their needs for volunteer assistance by holding regular service projects and partnering toward shared goals.
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Volunteers assist the Kenyan Ministry of Education to meet its goals by teaching mathematics, biology, chemistry and physics in secondary schools throughout rural Kenya. A strong foundation in applied sciences is a key part of Kenya's goal of industrialization by 2020. Volunteers also provide HIV/AIDS education through outreach programs in schools, youth groups and community organizations.  
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3. Helping our members advance their careers through structured professional development events and by establishing a vibrant, organized network of mentors in various industries.
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From time to time, we also engage in events of a symbolic or historic nature, such as marching in a parade or participating in a public ceremony. Membership is open to all who share a passion for community service, professional development, and international engagement. The first year is always free; afterwards, dues are $15.00 per year."''
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==Peace Corps History==
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== 2012-2013 Mission Statement ==
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''Main article: [[History of the Peace Corps in Kenya]]''
 
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The Peace Corps program in Kenya began soon after the country gained its independence in 1963, and it is one of the largest programs in Africa. The first group of 37 Peace Corps Volunteers arrived in Kenya on December 31, 1964. Since early 1965, the Peace Corps has been assisting the government of Kenya in meeting its development needs by providing skilled Volunteers in the areas of economic development, education, and public health.
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To serve as a resource to RPCVs and friends in the Washington DC area through social events, community service projects, and professional development programs that embody the 3rd Goal and spirit of the Peace Corps.
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To contribute to Kenya’s economic development, the Peace Corps focuses on activities that support creation of employment and income-generating opportunities. The country’s focus on gender equality creates a need to expand girls’ access to and retention in secondary schools. Also, the government of Kenya stresses the importance of providing education to children with special needs so that they can be fully contributing members of society. Public health continues to face challenges in both water-borne and infectious diseases, especially HIV/AIDS, and environmental health hazards. The Peace Corps/Kenya program enjoys strong support from government officials at national and district levels.
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== What We Do ==
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In addition to organizing regular social events for our members, RPCV/W divides its long-term programming into four areas:
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==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
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=== Community Service ===
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''Main article: [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in Kenya]]''
 
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As a Volunteer, you will most likely live in a rural community and not have access to indoor plumbing or electricity. Expect to use hurricane lamps and candles for lighting and to cook using charcoal, wood, or a single-burner kerosene stove. Peace Corps/Kenya, for both philosophical and budget considerations, requires host ministries to provide all Volunteers with housing. The standard and condition of Volunteer housing vary widely, from mud houses with thatched roofs to very modern cement houses with running water and electricity. The type of house you have will depend on your project, the area of the country in which you are posted, and the types of houses available in the community. You may also be required to share housing with other staff or to live in a room behind a shop at a market center. In short, you can expect to have, at the very least, a room to call your own. The decision as to whether housing standards are “acceptable” lies with the associate Peace Corps director and medical staff. When it comes to your housing, you should not lose sight of the guiding goal of the Peace Corps. Maintain your focus on service to the people of Kenya and not on the level of your accommodations.
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RPCV/W is committed to supporting local organizations engaged in community development in the DC area. We are all volunteers at heart, and our members enjoy coming out on a weekend to help out a worthy cause. Keep an eye on our events for our next volunteer day. Service events are organized by our Community Service Director.  
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==Training==
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=== Partnership for Peace ===
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''Main article: [[Training in Kenya]]''
 
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The most important function of Peace Corps staff is to provide support for Volunteers. Support does not imply daily supervision of Volunteers’ work, nor does it imply assuming parental roles. Volunteer support implies an ongoing interaction between Volunteers and all Peace Corps staff regarding how you handle such matters as your overall adjustment to the Peace Corps, your job assignment, and your community. Your associate Peace Corps director is responsible for making regular visits to your site to assist you in any way possible in your orientation in-country. Additionally, the country director and the Peace Corps medical officer make periodic visits to Volunteer sites.
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Each year, we officially sponsor a grassroots nonprofit that shares our goals and values. In addition to awarding them a cash grant based on the proceeds of our yearly fundraiser, we advertise their events through our social network and help them organize volunteers for their activities. Our Vice President is charged with coordinating and strengthening the PfP program.  
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Training will be busy for everyone. Often you will work over eight hours a day, five days a week. Be prepared for a rigorous, full schedule. The principal objectives of training are to provide a learning environment that enables you to develop the language (Kiswahili for all, Kenyan Sign Language for deaf educators), technical, and cultural skills; knowledge; and attitude necessary to work and live in Kenya.
 
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The community/school-based approach used as the main training method means that you will spend most of your time learning by doing in your communities or schools and then reflecting on your experiences during formal sessions. You will spend most days in the field, completing hands-on, practical tasks and participating in group discussions, lectures, and field trips. Each week you will spend one or two days at the training center, or in one of the schools for deaf educators, discussing the prior week’s learning, preparing for the next work week, and attending essential cross-cultural, health, safety, administrative, and integration sessions.
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=== Professional Development ===
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==Health Care and Safety==
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We believe that all RPCVs should be able to network freely, and encourage our members to make time for their peers who are looking to climb the ladder. To this end, we host regular networking events in panels, and we are organizing
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a vibrant network of mentors in dozens of different workplaces who are willing to sit down for coffee with a qualified applicant or someone interested in their work. This program is overseen by our Professional Development Director who acts as our chief networker and job coach.
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''Main article: [[Health care and safety in Kenya]]''
 
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The Peace Corps in Kenya maintains qualified staff to take care of Volunteers’ primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are also available in Kenya at local, and equivalent American-standard hospitals. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported either to an equivalent of American-standard medical facility in the region or to the United States.
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=== Special Events ===
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==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
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As our numbers grow, so does our role in the community. RPCV/W is often called upon to plan and participate in major public events. From parades to public-speaking, our services are always in demand. On September 28, 2011, RPCV/W organized a large public event at Arlington National Cemetery to mark the 50th Anniversary of the Peace Corps, which hosted over 5,000 participants. Since 1984, we have gathered each year to lay flowers at the gravesite of John F. Kennedy in Arlington National Cemetery. We have also march with Peace Corps in Presidential Inauguration and DC's LGBT Capitol Pride Parade.
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''Main article: [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Kenya]]''
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== Our Community==
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In Kenya, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyles, background, and beliefs will be judged in a cultural context very different from our own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed.
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There are over 5,000 Returned Peace Corps Volunteers living in the Washington, DC Metro area. RPCV/W includes over 900 of them as active, dues paying members.  
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Outside of Kenya’s capital, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What is viewed as “typical” cultural behavior or norms may be a narrow and selective interpretation, such as the perception in some countries that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes. The people of Kenya are justly known for their generous hospitality to foreigners; however, members of the community in which you will live may display a range of reactions to differences that you present. We will ask you to be supportive of one another.  
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According to our latest survey, most of our members join to network, make friends, and to become familiar with the DC Peace Corps Community. 83% of our
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members attend at least one event throughout the year. 85% read our weekly email newsletter. Most have made friends, participated in fun events, and gotten involved with worthy volunteer projects. Many have gotten jobs, found mentors, and even met a significant other through our network.
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* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
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The median age of our membership is 32, and over half possess an advanced degree. They work in international development and the nonprofit sector primarily. 74% are female and 29% are male. Above all, we’re all interested in community development and sharing our stories.
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* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
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* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
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* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
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* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
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* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
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==2008 Activity==
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==Frequently Asked Questions==
 
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''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Kenya]]''
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{{:RPCVw presents}}
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* How much luggage will I be allowed to bring to Kenya?
 
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* What is the electric current in Kenya?
 
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* How much money should I bring?
 
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* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
 
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* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
 
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* Do I need an international driver’s license?
 
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* What should I bring as gifts for Kenya friends and my host family?
 
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* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
 
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* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
 
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* Can I call home from Kenya?
 
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* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
 
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* Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?
 
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== Partnership ==
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*Developmentary's (Peace Corps Wiki) Application Oct 2009 http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/images/RPCVapp2010PeaceProgram.pdf
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*RPCVw Response: (rejected in first round) http://www.peacecorpswiki.org/images/RPCVw_app_response_DevelopmentaryInc_11-2-09.pdf
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==Packing List==
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==External Links==
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[http://www.rpcvw.org/mc/page.do Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington D.C.]
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''Main article: [[Packing list for Kenya]]''
 
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This list has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Kenya and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight limit on baggage. And remember, you can get almost everything you need in Kenya.
 
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* General Clothing
 
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* Shoes
 
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* Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
 
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* Recreation/Entertainment
 
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* Miscellaneous
 
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[[Category:Regional Associations]]
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==See also==
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[[Category:RPCV Associations]]
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* [[Volunteers who served in Kenya]]
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* [[List of resources for Kenya]]
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* [[Friends of Kenya]]
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* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
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* [[Inspector General Reports]]
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==External links==
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* [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/ke.html Peace Corps Journals - Kenya]
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[[Category:Kenya]] [[Category:Africa]]
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[[Category:Country]]
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Revision as of 17:40, 11 July 2013

Contents

About Us

“Bringing the Experience Home”

We are a volunteer-run organization representing the sizable community of Returned Peace Corps Volunteers and groupies who live and work in Washington, DC. We do this through three main activities.

1. Holding social events such as happy hours, parties, field trips, and other fun, interest-based activities. Any member may start a club and utilize our network to organize it.

2. Helping local nonprofits engaged in community development meet their needs for volunteer assistance by holding regular service projects and partnering toward shared goals.

3. Helping our members advance their careers through structured professional development events and by establishing a vibrant, organized network of mentors in various industries.

From time to time, we also engage in events of a symbolic or historic nature, such as marching in a parade or participating in a public ceremony. Membership is open to all who share a passion for community service, professional development, and international engagement. The first year is always free; afterwards, dues are $15.00 per year."

2012-2013 Mission Statement

To serve as a resource to RPCVs and friends in the Washington DC area through social events, community service projects, and professional development programs that embody the 3rd Goal and spirit of the Peace Corps.

What We Do

In addition to organizing regular social events for our members, RPCV/W divides its long-term programming into four areas:

Community Service

RPCV/W is committed to supporting local organizations engaged in community development in the DC area. We are all volunteers at heart, and our members enjoy coming out on a weekend to help out a worthy cause. Keep an eye on our events for our next volunteer day. Service events are organized by our Community Service Director.


Partnership for Peace

Each year, we officially sponsor a grassroots nonprofit that shares our goals and values. In addition to awarding them a cash grant based on the proceeds of our yearly fundraiser, we advertise their events through our social network and help them organize volunteers for their activities. Our Vice President is charged with coordinating and strengthening the PfP program.


Professional Development

We believe that all RPCVs should be able to network freely, and encourage our members to make time for their peers who are looking to climb the ladder. To this end, we host regular networking events in panels, and we are organizing a vibrant network of mentors in dozens of different workplaces who are willing to sit down for coffee with a qualified applicant or someone interested in their work. This program is overseen by our Professional Development Director who acts as our chief networker and job coach.


Special Events

As our numbers grow, so does our role in the community. RPCV/W is often called upon to plan and participate in major public events. From parades to public-speaking, our services are always in demand. On September 28, 2011, RPCV/W organized a large public event at Arlington National Cemetery to mark the 50th Anniversary of the Peace Corps, which hosted over 5,000 participants. Since 1984, we have gathered each year to lay flowers at the gravesite of John F. Kennedy in Arlington National Cemetery. We have also march with Peace Corps in Presidential Inauguration and DC's LGBT Capitol Pride Parade.

Our Community

There are over 5,000 Returned Peace Corps Volunteers living in the Washington, DC Metro area. RPCV/W includes over 900 of them as active, dues paying members.

According to our latest survey, most of our members join to network, make friends, and to become familiar with the DC Peace Corps Community. 83% of our members attend at least one event throughout the year. 85% read our weekly email newsletter. Most have made friends, participated in fun events, and gotten involved with worthy volunteer projects. Many have gotten jobs, found mentors, and even met a significant other through our network.

The median age of our membership is 32, and over half possess an advanced degree. They work in international development and the nonprofit sector primarily. 74% are female and 29% are male. Above all, we’re all interested in community development and sharing our stories.

2008 Activity

Partnership

External Links

Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of Washington D.C.

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