Difference between pages "Continuing Services" and "History of the Peace Corps in Georgia"

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For many of us, the work we did in-country doesn't stop once we return home.  A number of RPCVs have started their own non-profits to benefit their former host countries, non-profits similar to the work done while in Peace Corps and many other initiatives.  Below is a list of resources for those groups and organizations seeking resources while conituing their services.
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{{History of the Peace Corps by country}}
  
==Non-Profit Opportunities==
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As early as 1994, the government of Georgia indicated its desire to host Peace Corps Volunteers. Although the Peace Corps sent an assessment team to Georgia in response to that request, a decision to enter Georgia was indefinitely postponed due to security concerns over civil unrest in the Abkhazia and Ossetia provinces. In 1997, the Georgian government formally reiterated its desire to host Peace Corps Volunteers, and again an assessment team was sent. Although the security situation had significantly improved by this time, budgetary constraints prevented the Peace Corps from acting upon this request, and the decision was delayed yet again. In late 1999, after repeated inquiries from the Georgian government and consistent accounts from the U.S. Embassy in Tbilisi that the security situation remained conducive to the presence of Peace Corps Volunteers, the decision was made to reassess the possibility of setting up a program. The review was positive, and funds were set aside by the Peace Corps to establish a program in Georgia in 2000.
  
===Grant Research===
 
  
*[http://www.charitynavigator.org/ Charity Navigator]
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===History and Future of Peace Corps Programming in Georgia===
*[http://www.globalgiving.com/pr/900/proj836a.html Global Giving Resources]
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*[http://www.grants.gov/applicants/find_grant_opportunities.jsp Grants.gov]
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*[http://www.guidestar.org/ Guidestar.org]
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===Grants Opportunities===
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The Peace Corps’ first program in Georgia began in 2001 with a secondary education/English teaching project of 21 Volunteers. In 2002, we welcomed our second group of 24 Volunteers in this project, as well as two Volunteers in a pilot secondary education/English teacher-trainer project. These education projects resulted from a request by the government of Georgia for technical and human resource assistance from the Peace Corps, particularly in the rural areas of the country.  In exploring various programming sectors, government officials and the Peace Corps concurred that education projects targeting English language learning and teaching would meet a growing demand and have the greatest potential for Georgia.
  
====''Foundation Grant Sources''====
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Peace Corps/Georgia works in close collaboration with the Georgian Ministry of Education, individual schools, universities, and communities that recognize that English language skills can provide Georgian citizens with many advantages. These advantages include the possibilities to further education and advance careers, the ability to access information and technology (particularly through electronic means), the chance to further a closer relationship with Western democratic countries, and the opportunity to learn about new business practices. The current education Volunteers in Georgia serve in secondary schools, universities, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in villages and towns throughout the country.
  
*[http://www.hewlett.org/ The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation] - The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation makes grants to address the most serious social and environmental problems facing society, where risk capital, responsibly invested, may make a difference over time.  The Foundation places a high value on sustaining and improving institutions that make positive contributions to society.
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The education projects effectively address the above issues while also introducing lessons and activities on critical thinking, problem solving, life skills, democratic values, civic responsibility, the identification of community development needs, and the implementation of solutions and projects to meet those needs.  
  
*[http://www.wkkf.org/ The WK Kellog Foundation] - The WK Kellogg Foundation is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to apply knowledge to solve the problems of people. The founder, W.K. Kellogg, the cereal industry pioneer, established the Foundation in 1930. Since its beginning, the Foundation has continuously focused on building the capacity of individuals, communities, and institutions to solve their own problems.
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Through the project, communities have the opportunity to communicate and share cultural information with native English speakers—a chance they would otherwise most likely not have. Teachers, students, and community members improve their listening and speaking skills through daily communication with Volunteers. Education Volunteers introduce new teaching methodologies and help Georgian teachers design and deliver lessons with a student-centered focus.  
  
*[http://www.mott.org/ The Charles Stewart Mott Foundation] - The Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, established in 1926 in Flint by an automotive pioneer, is a private philanthropy committed to supporting projects that promote a just, equitable and sustainable society.  
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Currently, Peace Corps/Georgia’s programming includes the secondary education/English teaching project, the university English teaching project in regional universities, and a component for NGO development, which began in 2004 with 10 NGO development Volunteers.  
  
*[http://www.skollfoundation.org/ The Skoll Foundation] - The Skoll Foundation's mission is to advance systemic change to benefit communities around the world by investing in, connecting, and celebrating social entrepreneurs. Social Edge, an online community sponsored by the Skoll Foundation, connects social entrepreneurs and other thought leaders, engaging them in dialogue and discussion and promoting information sharing and learning.
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This latter project addresses areas of social development through the work of local NGOs throughout Georgia including organizational management, community mobilization, and networking. Health and environmental education as well as youth development and women’s issues are areas targeted by local NGOs and where Volunteers work with their NGO counterparts to lend their assistance and skills. In 2004, the first 10 NGO Volunteers were placed throughout Georgia.  In 2005, 16 more NGO development Volunteers were added to the program. These Volunteers assist nongovernmental organizations with all levels of organizational management, provide guidance towards transparency in financial and project operations, develop fundraising strategies for self-reliance and sustainability. Local NGOs are often driven by enthusiastic Georgian Volunteers who are highly educated but lack experience in development. There has been much interest by NGOs in bringing in Peace Corps Volunteers to assist them in their community outreach efforts.
  
====''NPCA Grant Sources''====
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===Assignment History===
  
*[http://www.rpcv.org/pages/sitepage.cfm?id=255 The Shriver Award for Humanitarian Service] - The Shriver Award for Humanitarian Service is awarded by the National Peace Corps Association to a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who continues to make a sustained and distinguished contribution to humanitarian causes at home or abroad. The award was named to recognize the tremendous contributions of the first Peace Corps Director, Sargent Shriver, in the founding and development of the Peace Corps.
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{| border="1" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="0"
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|-
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| align="center" | '''[[Sector]]''' || '''[[Assignment]]''' || '''[[Beg. Yr]]''' || '''[[End. Yr]]'''
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|-
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| rowspan="3" align="center"| '''[[Business]]'''
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| [[Business Advising]]
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| [[2005]]
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| [[2007]]
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|-
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| [[Business Development]]
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| [[2007]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
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| [[NGO Advising]]
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| [[2004]]
 +
| [[2007]]
 +
|-
 +
| rowspan="3" align="center"| '''[[Education]]'''
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| [[English Teacher]]
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| [[2001]]
 +
| [[2007]]
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|-
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| [[English Teacher Trainer]]
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| [[2002]]
 +
| [[2002]]
 +
|-
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| [[Univ. English Teaching]]
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| [[2002]]
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| [[2006]]
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|-
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| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[Youth and Community Development]]'''
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| [[Commun. Serv/Deg.]]
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| [[2004]]
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| [[2007]]
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|-
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|}
  
*[http://www.rpcv.org/pages/sitepage.cfm?id=255 The Loret Miller Ruppe Award for Outstanding Community Service] - The Ruppe Award is presented annually by the NPCA to an outstanding affiliated group for a project or projects that promote the Third Goal of Peace Corps or continue to serve host countries, build group spirit and cooperation, and promote service. The purpose of the award is not only to recognize the great work that its groups are doing, but also to generate ideas that other groups may emulate in their communities.
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[[Category:Georgia]]
 
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*[http://www.rpcv.org/pages/sitepage.cfm?id=255 Continuation of Service Grants] - Grants of up to $1,000 for affiliated groups annually to support community-based development projects at home and abroad. Following the NPCA staff determination that there are eligible finalists to recommend for this grant, an independent awards review panel determines a final winner.
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*[http://www.rpcv.org/pages/sitepage.cfm?id=255 The NPCA Website Award] - This award honors those groups that have labored to create and maintain effective new media services for "bringing the world back home" and enhancing the RPCV community.
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*[http://www.rpcv.org/pages/sitepage.cfm?id=255 The Newsletter Award] - The importance of a newsletter to the success of an RPCV group cannot be overestimated. For this reason, the NPCA recognizes the best newsletters from its affiliate groups in two categories: editorial content and structure.
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==Work and Volunteer Opportunities==
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* [[Crisis Corps]]
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* [[Doctors Without Borders]]
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* [[Fellows / USA]]
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* [[United Nations Volunteers]]
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* [[Volunteer Service Organization]]
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Latest revision as of 12:49, 8 December 2015

Country Resources

As early as 1994, the government of Georgia indicated its desire to host Peace Corps Volunteers. Although the Peace Corps sent an assessment team to Georgia in response to that request, a decision to enter Georgia was indefinitely postponed due to security concerns over civil unrest in the Abkhazia and Ossetia provinces. In 1997, the Georgian government formally reiterated its desire to host Peace Corps Volunteers, and again an assessment team was sent. Although the security situation had significantly improved by this time, budgetary constraints prevented the Peace Corps from acting upon this request, and the decision was delayed yet again. In late 1999, after repeated inquiries from the Georgian government and consistent accounts from the U.S. Embassy in Tbilisi that the security situation remained conducive to the presence of Peace Corps Volunteers, the decision was made to reassess the possibility of setting up a program. The review was positive, and funds were set aside by the Peace Corps to establish a program in Georgia in 2000.


History and Future of Peace Corps Programming in Georgia[edit]

The Peace Corps’ first program in Georgia began in 2001 with a secondary education/English teaching project of 21 Volunteers. In 2002, we welcomed our second group of 24 Volunteers in this project, as well as two Volunteers in a pilot secondary education/English teacher-trainer project. These education projects resulted from a request by the government of Georgia for technical and human resource assistance from the Peace Corps, particularly in the rural areas of the country. In exploring various programming sectors, government officials and the Peace Corps concurred that education projects targeting English language learning and teaching would meet a growing demand and have the greatest potential for Georgia.

Peace Corps/Georgia works in close collaboration with the Georgian Ministry of Education, individual schools, universities, and communities that recognize that English language skills can provide Georgian citizens with many advantages. These advantages include the possibilities to further education and advance careers, the ability to access information and technology (particularly through electronic means), the chance to further a closer relationship with Western democratic countries, and the opportunity to learn about new business practices. The current education Volunteers in Georgia serve in secondary schools, universities, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in villages and towns throughout the country.

The education projects effectively address the above issues while also introducing lessons and activities on critical thinking, problem solving, life skills, democratic values, civic responsibility, the identification of community development needs, and the implementation of solutions and projects to meet those needs.

Through the project, communities have the opportunity to communicate and share cultural information with native English speakers—a chance they would otherwise most likely not have. Teachers, students, and community members improve their listening and speaking skills through daily communication with Volunteers. Education Volunteers introduce new teaching methodologies and help Georgian teachers design and deliver lessons with a student-centered focus.

Currently, Peace Corps/Georgia’s programming includes the secondary education/English teaching project, the university English teaching project in regional universities, and a component for NGO development, which began in 2004 with 10 NGO development Volunteers.

This latter project addresses areas of social development through the work of local NGOs throughout Georgia including organizational management, community mobilization, and networking. Health and environmental education as well as youth development and women’s issues are areas targeted by local NGOs and where Volunteers work with their NGO counterparts to lend their assistance and skills. In 2004, the first 10 NGO Volunteers were placed throughout Georgia. In 2005, 16 more NGO development Volunteers were added to the program. These Volunteers assist nongovernmental organizations with all levels of organizational management, provide guidance towards transparency in financial and project operations, develop fundraising strategies for self-reliance and sustainability. Local NGOs are often driven by enthusiastic Georgian Volunteers who are highly educated but lack experience in development. There has been much interest by NGOs in bringing in Peace Corps Volunteers to assist them in their community outreach efforts.

Assignment History[edit]

Sector Assignment Beg. Yr End. Yr
Business Business Advising 2005 2007
Business Development 2007 2007
NGO Advising 2004 2007
Education English Teacher 2001 2007
English Teacher Trainer 2002 2002
Univ. English Teaching 2002 2006
Youth and Community Development Commun. Serv/Deg. 2004 2007