Difference between pages "Tanzania" and "Indonesia"

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The Republic of Indonesia is an archipelago of comprised of approximately 13,000 islands that stretch from mainland Southeast Asia to Papua New Guinea. The country's far flung geography and many islands have historically ensured the development of incredible diversity among its peoples. Many larger islands served as waypoints for Indian, Arab, and Chinese traders dating back to at least the 7th centuries, and in these areas, cross-cultural influences remain strong. However, many, less accessible societies have also developed independently from external influence. Thus, today, Indonesia is home to over seven-hundred living languages and an equally pronounced degree of cultural diversity.
 +
 +
Current Indo PCV's serve on Java, Indonesia's economic and political center. In terms of area, Java's 128,000 kilometers squared is comparable Florida. However, the island's advanced agriculturalism and rich, volcanic soils support an astonishing population of over 135 million, or approximately 58% of the country's total population. Volunteers serving in Java are also able to witness and take part in an important period of national identification for both the country and its people. For although Indonesia is home to the world's largest Muslim population, the vast majority of its people are committed to the tolerance and openness exemplified by "Pancasila," the nation's philosophical foundation, which calls for social justice, religious pluralism, just government, and democratic rule. And as Indonesia continues to embrace and develop its recently reformed democracy (1998), the country has the potential to stand as a powerful political example both within Southeast Asia and beyond.
 +
 
{{CountryboxAlternative
 
{{CountryboxAlternative
|Countryname= Tanzania
+
|Countryname= Indonesia
|CountryCode = tz
+
|CountryCode = id
 
|status = [[ACTIVE]]
 
|status = [[ACTIVE]]
|Flag= Flag_of_Tanzania.svg
+
|Flag= Flag_of_Indonesia.svg
|Welcomebooklink = http://www.peacecorps.gov/welcomebooks/tzwb621.pdf
+
|Welcomebooklink = http://www.peacecorps.gov/welcomebooks/phwb492.pdf
|Region= [[Africa]]
+
|Region= [[Asia]]
|CountryDirector= [[Andrea Wojnar-Diagne]]
+
|CountryDirector= [[Sheila Crowley]]
|Sectors= [[Health]]<br> ([[APCD]]: [[Hiyana Ally]])<br> [[Environment]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Eligard Dawson]])<br> [[Education]] <br>([[APCD]]: [[Thomas Msuka]])<br>
+
|Sectors= [[Education]]
|ProgramDates= [[1962]] - [[1969]] <br> [[1979]] - [[1991]] <br> [[1991]] - [[Present]]
+
|ProgramDates= [[1963]] - [[1965]]<br>[[2010]] - [[Present]]
|CurrentlyServing= 164
+
|CurrentlyServing= 89 (December 2013)
|TotalVolunteers= 2044
+
|TotalVolunteers= 140 ("New Era"-2010 to Present)
|Languages= [[Kiswahili]]
+
|Languages= '''Indonesian''' (Main), '''Javanese''' (Mainland East Java), '''Madurese''' (Madura Island and East-East Java), '''Sundanese''' (West Java)
|Map= Tz-map.gif
+
|Map= Indonesia_(orthographic_projection).svg.png
|stagingdate= Sep 20 2010
+
|stagingdate= April 4 2011
|stagingcity= Philadelphia
+
|stagingcity= San Francisco
 
}}
 
}}
 +
==Peace Corps History in Indonesia==
  
 +
Forty-five physical education Volunteers served in Indonesia from 1963-1964 working with Indonesians in advancing their sports programs. The program was brought to a close in 1965 as a result of political upheaval and concerns for the safety and security of the Volunteers.
  
A major focus for the Peace Corps program in Tanzania is secondary education. The country has a critical shortage of math and science teachers at the secondary school level. Due to lack of financial and human resources, the government is not able to attract the number of teachers it requires. Current Volunteers teach mathematics and science subjects in both private and public schools, as well as information and communication technology (ICT) at teacher colleges. All Volunteer teachers in secondary schools help with computer skills training.
+
In October 2006, the Government of Indonesia invited Peace Corps to send an assessment team to Indonesia for the purpose of reestablishing a program. A full assessment was completed in February 2007 and was followed up with a safety and security assessment in the fall of that year. The respective Governments signed a new agreement regarding the establishment of a Peace Corps program in December 2009.
 
+
Education Volunteers also work in resource identification and development, curriculum improvement, and extracurricular and community projects. Volunteers incorporate issues important to the surrounding community into their lesson plans, including HIV/AIDS, environmental education, and girls' empowerment.
+
 
+
The health education project increases basic health knowledge and improves health attitudes and behaviors of Tanzanian youth, particularly in the area of HIV/AIDS prevention. Volunteers are assigned in communities with functioning schools, primary and secondary schools, a health center/dispensary, and a functioning village government.
+
 
+
An environment project addresses basic village-level needs for the conservation and development of natural resources. The project has expanded to address community needs and national strategies, including the National Poverty Reduction Strategy Plan and a local government reform program that decentralized economic planning down to the district and village levels.
+
 
+
The project empowers Volunteers and their counterparts to make use of existing indigenous knowledge in agriculture, soil conservation, small-scale agribusiness, environmental education, home gardens, and HIV/AIDS awareness while mitigating its impact to agriculture and food security in the rural areas.
+
 
+
All Volunteers are involved with HIV/AIDS prevention activities. They may also help care for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs) or orphans and vulnerable children (OVCs) by providing nutrition education through permaculture and sustainable agriculture activities so these groups can live longer more productive lives by boosting their immune systems.
+
 
+
 
+
==Peace Corps History==
+
 
+
''Main article: [[History of the Peace Corps in Tanzania]]''
+
 
+
Peace Corps Volunteers first arrived in Tanzania (then called Tanganyika) in 1962. Since then, approximately 2,000 Volunteers have served in Tanzania, working in education, health, the environment, and agriculture. In the early years of Peace Corps/Tanzania, most Volunteers focused on education.
+
 
+
As a result of political disagreements over the Vietnam War and former President Julius Nyerere’s philosophy of self-reliance, the Peace Corps withdrew from Tanzania from 1969 to 1979. The Peace Corps had another, shorter period of interrupted service in 1991 and 1992 because of tensions and security concerns related to the Persian Gulf War. In 1992, a thorough evaluation of the Peace Corps’ development priorities in Tanzania led to a decision to focus efforts on revitalizing the program in secondary education. In 1996 Peace Corps/Tanzania launched an environment project, and in 2000 it initiated a school health education project. Today, Peace Corps/Tanzania has about 130 Volunteers; half of them serve in the education project, 30 percent in the environment project, and 20 percent in the health education project.  
+
  
 +
[[Image: Indonesia.id4.obama.visit.jpg|350px]]
  
 
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
 
==Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle==
 +
All volunteers live with host families. Living with host families can initially be challenging however your host families will be integral in exposing and helping you better understand Indonesian culture, customs, and most importantly with community integration.
  
''Main article: [[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles in Tanzania]]''
+
Peace Corps Staff, in collaboration with the selected school will find living arrangements that meet Peace Corps standards.  Prior to site placements, there will be a brief interview in which you can discuss specific requests about your arrangements. All volunteers will live in homes with running water and electricity. You'll be provided with a bed, desk, and dresser. You will be given a small readjustment allowance to purchase any additional items you may need to make your new living situation more comfortable, including money for a bicycle.
  
Volunteer sites range from towns in the far north like Bukoba, Mwanza, and Musoma on Lake Victoria to towns in the deep south like Mtwara and Lindi. No Volunteers serve along the western borders with Burundi, Rwanda, or Lake Tanganyika. Health Volunteers are assigned to communities where there is a primary and secondary school and health center. Education Volunteers are posted at or near secondary schools in both rural and urban sites, while environment Volunteers work in village communities. The determination of a Volunteer’s site is made during training, after staff members have had an opportunity to match an individual’s strengths and capabilities with the needs of the host community or school.
+
Most volunteers will have access small family-operated shops that sell basic amenities, markets, post offices, internet cafes, and some form of public transportation (though that doesn't mean it's consistent).  
  
 +
In the home, it is most common that your host family will provide meals. Most Indonesian homes do not have laundry machines. Laundry will usually be hand-washed by the volunteer, however there are places in most neighborhoods that offer laundry services. As for bathrooms, most volunteers will be using squat toilets and taking bucket baths at least twice per day.
  
 +
'''Volunteer Lifestyle'''
  
==Training==
+
PCVs receive a comfortable monthly living stipend provided by Peace Corps. With this, a Volunteer pays their host family for their room, electricity, and water, as well as 3 meals a day (although this is optional).
  
''Main article: [[Training in Tanzania]]''
+
It is possible for most PCVs to have internet in their homes, however most schools have WiFi. If a Volunteer's school does not have WiFi, warnets (Internet Cafes) are very common in Indonesia and cheap.
  
Training is an essential part of Peace Corps service. Learning to live and work in a new culture and environment can be quite challenging. The goal of pre-service training is to give you enough skills and information to allow you to live and work effectively in Tanzania.
+
Generally most PCVs will come to find that they are living quite well with what they are given.
  
The five major components of training are technical skills, cross-cultural adaptation, language, personal health, and safety and security, which are presented in an integrated manner. You will live with a Tanzanian family and interact daily with Tanzanians during most of your training. You will also have opportunities to work with and learn from Tanzanians in real-life experiences. Education Volunteers will spend three weeks at an internship school near their host family’s home. Environmental Volunteers will have the opportunity to learn directly from farmers in the villages where their training takes place. Health Volunteers will be able to gain valuable experience in schools and health facilities near their training site. The training period can be both stressful and exhilarating. You will confront a new culture, work to gain fluency in a new language, learn new professional skills, and build support systems with others who are going through the same roller-coaster of adjustments. You will need patience, flexibility, energy, and good humor to get the most out of this rich experience. You will find the Peace Corps’ training staff ready and willing to accommodate your needs and help you get off to the best possible start. The Peace Corps anticipates that you will approach training with an open mind, a desire to learn, and a willingness to become involved.  
+
==Pre-Service Training==
 +
Pre-Service Training is an intense 10 week program that prepares volunteers to be successful in their final post. Indonesia’s PST consists of cross-cultural, language, TEFL, medical, and safety & security training. Because PC Indo is set up to be a Community Based Training program, trainees live in small villages and receive a large amount of training there. Trainees live with a host family in order to gain access to the language and community quickly and more fully. During PST, trainees are also required to teach at a practicum school (2 weeks) to learn about how Indonesian schools and classes are run. PST for the ID4-ID7 groups has been in the city of Batu, East Java.
  
 +
==Healthcare & Safety==
  
 +
Peace Corps provides all PCVs with adequate healthcare during training and throughout service. Upon arrival in Indonesia, the Peace Corps Medical Officer will equip you with a medical kit (a list will be posted soon) that can be refilled with anything you need at any time. There is no need to bring basic medicine from the States.
  
==Health Care and Safety==
+
During training and throughout service you will participate in a number of detailed medical and safety sessions that will prepare you a variety of situations. Malaria and Dengue are endemic to Indonesia, and Volunteers will learn how to best prepare and guard against these. Volunteers are required to take a malaria prophylaxis throughout their entire service. Other commons illnesses are diarrhea and infections. Overall, many Volunteers do not have major health issues during their service in Indonesia.
  
''Main article: [[Health care and safety in Tanzania]]''
+
If you have any concerns, you are encouraged to contact the Medical Officer, who remains on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.
+
The Peace Corps’ highest priority is maintaining the good health and safety of every Volunteer. Peace Corps medical programs emphasize the preventive, rather than the curative, approach to disease. The Peace Corps in Tanzania maintains a clinic with full-time medical officers, who assist Volunteers with their primary healthcare needs. Additional medical services, such as testing and basic treatment, are also available in Tanzania at local hospitals. If you become seriously ill, you will be transported either to an approved medical facility in the region or to the United States.
+
  
 +
==Cultural and Work-Related Challenges==
  
==Diversity and Cross-Cultural Issues==
+
Diversity of site placements and Volunteers’ personalities guarantees that each PCV has a unique, in-country experience.  That said, both staff and Volunteers respect each trainee’s right to “figure out” Indonesia for him or herself, to write his or her own story.  The list of “cultural and occupational challenges” included here, then, has been simplified. Its contents target only some of the broadest obstacles we face as Indonesian PCVs.
  
''Main article: [[Diversity and cross-cultural issues in Tanzania]]''
+
=== Cultural Challenges ===
 +
* “Jam Karet” ("Rubber Time")
 +
* Conservative dress expectations both in and outside of school
 +
* Lack of privacy
 +
* Lack of independence sufficient to perform everyday chores and activities (more so for women)
 +
* Food variety
  
In Tanzania, as in other Peace Corps host countries, Volunteers’ behavior, lifestyle, background, and beliefs are judged in a cultural context very different from their own. Certain personal perspectives or characteristics commonly accepted in the United States may be quite uncommon, unacceptable, or even repressed in Tanzania.
+
=== Work-Related Challenges ===
 +
* Frequent, unexpected class cancellations
 +
* Teaching counterparts unaccustomed to participatory learning techniques
 +
* Poorly written textbooks
 +
* Large, multilevel classes
 +
* High expectations from administrators and counterparts
 +
* Limited access to teaching resources (photocopiers, basic supplies, etc.)
 +
* Motivation from Counterparts
  
Outside of Tanzania’s largest cities, residents of rural communities have had relatively little direct exposure to other cultures, races, religions, and lifestyles. What people view as typical American behavior or norms may be a misconception, such as the belief that all Americans are rich and have blond hair and blue eyes.
+
==Packing List==
  
* Possible Issues for Female Volunteers
+
Advice (will expand in the coming months!): Pack minimally. Don't be too surprised as you will be able to find most things you need in Surabaya. If you need items from a special brand or company, you may have a little trouble but getting items shipped over is not too difficult, though fairly expensive. It is suggested that you buy high quality and durable items in the States as foreign brands can be more expensive overseas.
* Possible Issues for Volunteers of Color
+
* Possible Issues for Senior Volunteers
+
* Possible Issues for Gay, Lesbian, or Bisexual Volunteers
+
* Possible Issues for Married Volunteers
+
* Possible Religious Issues for Volunteers
+
* Possible Issues for Volunteers With Disabilities
+
  
 +
Before you purchase some major items, be sure to check out discounts that are offered to Peace Corps Volunteers, this can save you a lot of money!
  
==Frequently Asked Questions==
+
Keep in mind, you have an 80lb weight limit and you will be charged at the airport if you exceed this.
  
{{Volunteersurvey2008
+
Clothes:
|H1r=  7
+

|H1s=  78.7
+
Many of you, male and female, will be given a uniform by your school. Knowing this may reduce the amount of “teaching” clothes you feel you need to bring.
|H2r=  22
+
|H2s=  86.1
+
|H3r=  26
+
|H3s=  86.3
+
|H4r=  21
+
|H4s=  107.5
+
|H5r=  29
+
|H5s=  54.7
+
|H6r=  7
+
|H6s=  104.7
+
}}
+
  
''Main article: [[FAQs about Peace Corps in Tanzania]]''
+
* Tailoring is very cheap here, so don’t be afraid to pack lightly for service and plan on having some things made once you arrive.
 +
* Indonesian teachers dress very well; don’t expect to wear t-shirt, jeans, and flip-flops to school.
 +
* Higher-quality clothes which can withstand two years of hand-washing are preferred. You’ll also appreciate clothes made of lightweight and/or fast-drying cloth.
 +
* You can find most clothing you need here, though average (or above) sized Americans may have difficulty and will need to get things made, especially shoes.
 +
* Leather bags or jackets may mold quickly here. It's true.
 +
* Female volunteers comment that women shouldn’t bother bringing anything low cut as you’re unlikely to wear it within your communities.
  
* How much luggage am I allowed to bring to Tanzania?
+
==Peace Corps Indonesia New & Other Useful Links==
* What is the electric current in Tanzania?
+
* How much money should I bring?
+
* When can I take vacation and have people visit me?
+
* Will my belongings be covered by insurance?
+
* Do I need an international driver’s license?
+
* What should I bring as gifts for Tanzania friends and my host family?
+
* Where will my site assignment be when I finish training and how isolated will I be?
+
* How can my family contact me in an emergency?
+
* Can I call home from Tanzania?
+
* Should I bring a cellular phone with me?
+
* Will there be e-mail and Internet access? Should I bring my computer?
+
 
+
 
+
==Packing List==
+
 
+
''Main article: [[Packing list for Tanzania]]''
+
 
+
This section has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Tanzania and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight limit on baggage. Luggage should be durable, lockable, and easy to carry. Because you will probably travel a lot by bus, duffel bags or small internal frame backpacks are more practical than suitcases.
+
 
+
* General Clothing
+
* For Women
+
* For Men
+
* Shoes
+
* Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items
+
* Kitchen
+
* Entertainment
+
* Miscellaneous
+
 
+
 
+
==Peace Corps News==
+
  
 
Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
 
Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by [[News | country of service]] or [[News by state|your home state]]
  
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22tanzania%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
+
''The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.''<br><rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22indonesia%22&output=rss|charset=UTF-8|short|date=M d</rss>
 
+
<br>'''[http://peacecorpsjournals.com PEACE CORPS JOURNALS]'''<br>''( As of {{CURRENTDAYNAME}} {{CURRENTMONTHNAME}} {{CURRENTDAY}}, {{CURRENTYEAR}} )''<rss title=off desc=off>http://peacecorpsjournals.com/rss/tz/blog/50.xml|charset=UTF-8|short|max=10</rss>
+
 
+
==Country Fund==
+
 
+
Contributions to the [https://www.peacecorps.gov/index.cfm?shell=resources.donors.contribute.projDetail&projdesc=621-CFD Tanzania Country Fund] will support Volunteer and community projects that will take place in Tanzania. These projects include water and sanitation, agricultural development, and youth programs.
+
  
 
==See also==
 
==See also==
* [[Volunteers who served in Tanzania]]
+
* [[Volunteers who served in Indonesia]]
* [[Friends of Tanzania]]
+
* [[List of resources for Tanzania]]
+
* [[Pre-Departure Checklist]]
+
* [[Inspector General Reports]]
+
 
+
 
+
==External links==
+
* [http://www.peacecorpsjournals.com/tz.html Peace Corps Journals - Tanzania]
+
*[http://wikitravel.org/en/Tanzania Information on Travel into and around Tanzania] - WikiTravel includes international travel routes for visitors as well as general guidelines and tips for general tourism in the country.
+
* [http://www.ziarasafaris.com/ Tanzania Safari & Tourism Information]
+
  
[[Category:Tanzania]] [[Category:Africa]]
+
[[Category:Indonesia]] [[Category:Asia]]
 
[[Category:Country]]
 
[[Category:Country]]

Revision as of 01:16, 15 December 2013

The Republic of Indonesia is an archipelago of comprised of approximately 13,000 islands that stretch from mainland Southeast Asia to Papua New Guinea. The country's far flung geography and many islands have historically ensured the development of incredible diversity among its peoples. Many larger islands served as waypoints for Indian, Arab, and Chinese traders dating back to at least the 7th centuries, and in these areas, cross-cultural influences remain strong. However, many, less accessible societies have also developed independently from external influence. Thus, today, Indonesia is home to over seven-hundred living languages and an equally pronounced degree of cultural diversity.

Current Indo PCV's serve on Java, Indonesia's economic and political center. In terms of area, Java's 128,000 kilometers squared is comparable Florida. However, the island's advanced agriculturalism and rich, volcanic soils support an astonishing population of over 135 million, or approximately 58% of the country's total population. Volunteers serving in Java are also able to witness and take part in an important period of national identification for both the country and its people. For although Indonesia is home to the world's largest Muslim population, the vast majority of its people are committed to the tolerance and openness exemplified by "Pancasila," the nation's philosophical foundation, which calls for social justice, religious pluralism, just government, and democratic rule. And as Indonesia continues to embrace and develop its recently reformed democracy (1998), the country has the potential to stand as a powerful political example both within Southeast Asia and beyond.



US Peace Corps
Country name is::Indonesia


Status: ACTIVE
Staging: {{#ask:Country staging date::+country name is::Indonesia[[Staging date::>2014-11-29]]

mainlabel=- ?staging date= ?staging city= format=list sort=Staging date

}}


American Overseas Staff (FY2010): {{#ask:2010_pcstaff_salary::+country name is::Indonesia

mainlabel=- ?Grade_staff= ?Lastname_staff= ?Firstname_staff= ?Middlename_staff= ?Initial_staff= ?Salary_staff=$ format=list sort=Grade_staff

}}


Latest Early Termination Rates (FOIA 11-058): {{#ask:Country_early_termination_rate::+country name is::Indonesia

mainlabel=- ?2005_early_termination=2005 ?2006_early_termination=2006 ?2007_early_termination=2007 ?2008_early_termination=2008 format=list

}}


Peace Corps Journals - Indonesia File:Feedicon.gif

250px
Peace Corps Welcome Book
Region:

Asia

Country Director:

Sheila Crowley

Sectors:

Education

Program Dates:

1963 - 1965
2010 - Present

Current Volunteers:

89 (December 2013)

Total Volunteers:

140 ("New Era"-2010 to Present)

Languages Spoken:

Indonesian (Main), Javanese (Mainland East Java), Madurese (Madura Island and East-East Java), Sundanese (West Java)

Flag:

150px

__SHOWFACTBOX__

Peace Corps History in Indonesia

Forty-five physical education Volunteers served in Indonesia from 1963-1964 working with Indonesians in advancing their sports programs. The program was brought to a close in 1965 as a result of political upheaval and concerns for the safety and security of the Volunteers.

In October 2006, the Government of Indonesia invited Peace Corps to send an assessment team to Indonesia for the purpose of reestablishing a program. A full assessment was completed in February 2007 and was followed up with a safety and security assessment in the fall of that year. The respective Governments signed a new agreement regarding the establishment of a Peace Corps program in December 2009.

350px

Living Conditions and Volunteer Lifestyle

All volunteers live with host families. Living with host families can initially be challenging however your host families will be integral in exposing and helping you better understand Indonesian culture, customs, and most importantly with community integration.

Peace Corps Staff, in collaboration with the selected school will find living arrangements that meet Peace Corps standards. Prior to site placements, there will be a brief interview in which you can discuss specific requests about your arrangements. All volunteers will live in homes with running water and electricity. You'll be provided with a bed, desk, and dresser. You will be given a small readjustment allowance to purchase any additional items you may need to make your new living situation more comfortable, including money for a bicycle.

Most volunteers will have access small family-operated shops that sell basic amenities, markets, post offices, internet cafes, and some form of public transportation (though that doesn't mean it's consistent).

In the home, it is most common that your host family will provide meals. Most Indonesian homes do not have laundry machines. Laundry will usually be hand-washed by the volunteer, however there are places in most neighborhoods that offer laundry services. As for bathrooms, most volunteers will be using squat toilets and taking bucket baths at least twice per day.

Volunteer Lifestyle

PCVs receive a comfortable monthly living stipend provided by Peace Corps. With this, a Volunteer pays their host family for their room, electricity, and water, as well as 3 meals a day (although this is optional).

It is possible for most PCVs to have internet in their homes, however most schools have WiFi. If a Volunteer's school does not have WiFi, warnets (Internet Cafes) are very common in Indonesia and cheap.

Generally most PCVs will come to find that they are living quite well with what they are given.

Pre-Service Training

Pre-Service Training is an intense 10 week program that prepares volunteers to be successful in their final post. Indonesia’s PST consists of cross-cultural, language, TEFL, medical, and safety & security training. Because PC Indo is set up to be a Community Based Training program, trainees live in small villages and receive a large amount of training there. Trainees live with a host family in order to gain access to the language and community quickly and more fully. During PST, trainees are also required to teach at a practicum school (2 weeks) to learn about how Indonesian schools and classes are run. PST for the ID4-ID7 groups has been in the city of Batu, East Java.

Healthcare & Safety

Peace Corps provides all PCVs with adequate healthcare during training and throughout service. Upon arrival in Indonesia, the Peace Corps Medical Officer will equip you with a medical kit (a list will be posted soon) that can be refilled with anything you need at any time. There is no need to bring basic medicine from the States.

During training and throughout service you will participate in a number of detailed medical and safety sessions that will prepare you a variety of situations. Malaria and Dengue are endemic to Indonesia, and Volunteers will learn how to best prepare and guard against these. Volunteers are required to take a malaria prophylaxis throughout their entire service. Other commons illnesses are diarrhea and infections. Overall, many Volunteers do not have major health issues during their service in Indonesia.

If you have any concerns, you are encouraged to contact the Medical Officer, who remains on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

Cultural and Work-Related Challenges

Diversity of site placements and Volunteers’ personalities guarantees that each PCV has a unique, in-country experience. That said, both staff and Volunteers respect each trainee’s right to “figure out” Indonesia for him or herself, to write his or her own story. The list of “cultural and occupational challenges” included here, then, has been simplified. Its contents target only some of the broadest obstacles we face as Indonesian PCVs.

Cultural Challenges

  • “Jam Karet” ("Rubber Time")
  • Conservative dress expectations both in and outside of school
  • Lack of privacy
  • Lack of independence sufficient to perform everyday chores and activities (more so for women)
  • Food variety

Work-Related Challenges

  • Frequent, unexpected class cancellations
  • Teaching counterparts unaccustomed to participatory learning techniques
  • Poorly written textbooks
  • Large, multilevel classes
  • High expectations from administrators and counterparts
  • Limited access to teaching resources (photocopiers, basic supplies, etc.)
  • Motivation from Counterparts

Packing List

Advice (will expand in the coming months!): Pack minimally. Don't be too surprised as you will be able to find most things you need in Surabaya. If you need items from a special brand or company, you may have a little trouble but getting items shipped over is not too difficult, though fairly expensive. It is suggested that you buy high quality and durable items in the States as foreign brands can be more expensive overseas.

Before you purchase some major items, be sure to check out discounts that are offered to Peace Corps Volunteers, this can save you a lot of money!

Keep in mind, you have an 80lb weight limit and you will be charged at the airport if you exceed this.

Clothes:  Many of you, male and female, will be given a uniform by your school. Knowing this may reduce the amount of “teaching” clothes you feel you need to bring.

  • Tailoring is very cheap here, so don’t be afraid to pack lightly for service and plan on having some things made once you arrive.
  • Indonesian teachers dress very well; don’t expect to wear t-shirt, jeans, and flip-flops to school.
  • Higher-quality clothes which can withstand two years of hand-washing are preferred. You’ll also appreciate clothes made of lightweight and/or fast-drying cloth.
  • You can find most clothing you need here, though average (or above) sized Americans may have difficulty and will need to get things made, especially shoes.
  • Leather bags or jackets may mold quickly here. It's true.
  • Female volunteers comment that women shouldn’t bother bringing anything low cut as you’re unlikely to wear it within your communities.

Peace Corps Indonesia New & Other Useful Links

Current events relating to Peace Corps are also available by country of service or your home state

The following is automatic RSS feed of Peace Corps news for this country.
<rss title=on desc=off>http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&scoring=n&q=%22peace+corps%22+%22indonesia%22&output=rss%7Ccharset=UTF-8%7Cshort%7Cdate=M d</rss>

See also