Packing list for Lesotho

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{{Packing lists by country}}
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People preparing to come to [[Lesotho]] are, of course, interested in finding out what items and clothing they should bring. The problem in preparing such a list is that even the best suggestions are subject to variations and changes, depending on your personal interests and style. There is no perfect list! In the past, many Volunteers have regretted bringing half of what they packed. Almost everything you could want or need is available in-country, so do not load up on a lot of basic items.  
People preparing to come to [[Lesotho]] are, of course, interested in finding out what items and clothing they should bring. The problem in preparing such a list is that even the best suggestions are subject to variations and changes, depending on your personal interests and style. There is no perfect list! In the past, many Volunteers have regretted bringing half of what they packed. Almost everything you could want or need is available in-country, so do not load up on a lot of basic items.  
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* Comfortable shoes (sandals, tennis shoes), durable walking shoes (with good tread), and good-quality waterproof/Gore-Tex hiking boots  
* Comfortable shoes (sandals, tennis shoes), durable walking shoes (with good tread), and good-quality waterproof/Gore-Tex hiking boots  
* Sweatshirts and sweaters  
* Sweatshirts and sweaters  
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* One pair of shorts for vacations and lounging in the house   
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* One pair of shorts for vacations and lounging in the house  (older people will frown upon you for wearing shorts in many areas of Lesotho and you won't be able to wear shorts during training)
* Warm jacket or coat and light jacket  
* Warm jacket or coat and light jacket  
* Items for cold weather, including long underwear, tights (for women), hat, gloves, scarf, fleece tops  
* Items for cold weather, including long underwear, tights (for women), hat, gloves, scarf, fleece tops  
* Lots of underwear (harsh detergent and scrubbing are rough on underwear)  
* Lots of underwear (harsh detergent and scrubbing are rough on underwear)  
* Rain gear, including boots  
* Rain gear, including boots  
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* Swimwear and light gym wear  
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* Swimwear and light gym wear (there's a pool relatively near the training center and you'll have chances to jump in the ocean or the senqu while you're in Lesotho)
===For Men ===
===For Men ===
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* At least one dressy outfit (dress shirt, tie, and slacks)  
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* At least one dressy outfit for swearing in (dress shirt, tie, and slacks)I would not pack a suit
* Dress shoes  
* Dress shoes  
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* Button-down shirts and T-shirts  
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* Hiking/running shoes
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* Button-down shirts and T-shirts (if you're a teacher, you will be expected to wear dress shirts virtually always, although you can get away with t-shirts at most schools)
* Several pairs of khaki trousers and one or two pairs of jeans  
* Several pairs of khaki trousers and one or two pairs of jeans  
* Dark-colored socks (white ones are difficult to keep clean)
* Dark-colored socks (white ones are difficult to keep clean)
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* Hair clippers for men 
 
===For Women ===
===For Women ===
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* Two slips  
* Two slips  
* Two or three pairs of pants (to wear on holidays and in some work situations) Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items  
* Two or three pairs of pants (to wear on holidays and in some work situations) Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items  
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* A three-month supply of birth control pills, if applicable  
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* A three-month supply of birth control pills, if applicable
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*      You may be put in the mountains and be really greatful for camping gear
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*      You may also be put in a camptown and be really greatful for lots of american style clothes
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*      (mix it up)
===For Both Genders ===
===For Both Genders ===
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* Herbal teas and spices  
* Herbal teas and spices  
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* Ground coffee (French presses are available locally)  
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* Ground coffee (French presses are sometimes available locally, but it'd probably be a good idea to bring one, especially a backpacker's in the mug-style) Also, you can get instant coffee here easily, but not ground coffee. You can't really get good tea either so pack some.
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* A good hand-operated can opener  
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* A good hand-operated can opener (you won't be able to find a decent one in country)
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* Vegetable peeler  
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* Vegetable peeler (you won't be able to find a decent one in country and will peel a LOT of vegetables)
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* Two sturdy water bottles (e.g., Sigg or Nalgene)
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*      A good chefs knife, and even a way to sharpen it
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* Two sturdy water bottles (e.g., Sigg, Nalgene- even Platypus)
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Travel coffee Mug/Thermos
===Miscellaneous ===
===Miscellaneous ===
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* Sleeping bag for a cold climate, preferably one that packs into a small stuff sack (some Volunteers prefer down bags because of their warmth; others advise against down, as it can be hard to keep clean and dry)  
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* Sleeping bag for a cold climate, preferably one that packs into a small stuff sack (some Volunteers prefer down bags because of their warmth; others advise against down, as it can be hard to keep clean and dry) . You will have a bed at your place, but bags are nice for when you visit other volunteers (and you will do a lot of that)
* Lightweight foam sleeping pad  
* Lightweight foam sleeping pad  
* Two backpacks—a day pack and a large camping pack  
* Two backpacks—a day pack and a large camping pack  
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*      You will be able to charge your electronics (intermittently for some, frequently for others) so bring your computer/ipod, Kindle etc, it will make your time here a lot more enjoyable (and on the bad days, bearable)
* Battery-operated radio (FM/AM and shortwave) and/or a tape player  
* Battery-operated radio (FM/AM and shortwave) and/or a tape player  
* Music CDs, iPod, books, children’s songs,  
* Music CDs, iPod, books, children’s songs,  
* Batteries (available in-country, but expensive and not as long lasting as those in the United States) and/or power-pack units  
* Batteries (available in-country, but expensive and not as long lasting as those in the United States) and/or power-pack units  
* Solar battery recharger for those without electricity, though a solar set is easier to get in country
* Solar battery recharger for those without electricity, though a solar set is easier to get in country
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*      solar ipod etc charger (voltaic makes a good backpack, solio makes a good small charger)
* Solar or battery-operated calculator  
* Solar or battery-operated calculator  
* Two additional passport pictures  
* Two additional passport pictures  
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* Sunglasses and a hat for the sun  
* Sunglasses and a hat for the sun  
* Swiss Army knife (very expensive in Lesotho)  
* Swiss Army knife (very expensive in Lesotho)  
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* Pictures of your home, family, and friends  
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* Pictures of your home, family, and friends (Basotho LOVE pictures)
* Credit card (American Express, Visa, or MasterCard)  
* Credit card (American Express, Visa, or MasterCard)  
* Duct tape  
* Duct tape  
* Camera and supply of film—it is expensive here, but prints (color only) can be processed locally  
* Camera and supply of film—it is expensive here, but prints (color only) can be processed locally  
* Personal passport  
* Personal passport  
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* A travel book called Lonely Planet: Africa on a Shoestring (by Kevin Anglin, Becca Blond and Jean-Bernard Carillet, Lonely Planet Publications, 2004) (this is also available in country)
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* A travel book called Lonely Planet: Africa on a Shoestring (by Kevin Anglin, Becca Blond and Jean-Bernard Carillet, Lonely Planet Publications, 2004) (this is also available in country through volunteer trading)
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* Flashlight (small Maglite is a good choice)  
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* Headlamp or Flashlight (small Maglite is a good choice[headlamps are great for middle of the night latrine runs])  
* Markers, crayons, colored pencils, ink pens, mechanical pencils  
* Markers, crayons, colored pencils, ink pens, mechanical pencils  
[[Category:Lesotho]]
[[Category:Lesotho]]
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[[Category:Packing lists]]
 

Revision as of 11:20, 2 November 2011


Packing List for Lesotho
Packing.JPG

Packing Lists by Country

These lists has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Lesotho based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list!
Flag of Lesotho.svg

See also:
Pre-Departure Checklist
Staging Timeline

For information see Welcomebooks

People preparing to come to Lesotho are, of course, interested in finding out what items and clothing they should bring. The problem in preparing such a list is that even the best suggestions are subject to variations and changes, depending on your personal interests and style. There is no perfect list! In the past, many Volunteers have regretted bringing half of what they packed. Almost everything you could want or need is available in-country, so do not load up on a lot of basic items.

Volunteers must prepare themselves for extremes in climate (up to 95 degrees Fahrenheit in summer and below freezing in winter). You may have to discard a lot of preconceived ideas of Africa, including visions of hot, steamy jungles. Sweaters and coats are a must because there is no central heating, and buildings get very cold when nighttime temperatures drop below freezing. Some buildings have fireplaces or heaters, but they typically heat only a small area. All clothes should be washable and comfortable. You will most likely do your laundry by hand in cold water, so bring clothes that can take that kind of treatment. There is a lot of wind, dust, and dirt, and clothes need to be washed frequently.

Contents

General Clothing

For Men

For Women

For Both Genders

Kitchen

Travel coffee Mug/Thermos

Miscellaneous

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