Difference between pages "History of the Peace Corps in Guyana" and "Packing list for Tanzania"

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{{Packing lists by country}}
{| cellpadding="1" cellspacing="5" style="border: 1px solid #9866FF; background-color: #f3f3ff" width="300"
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| align="center" | '''<big>Country Resources</big>'''
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|-
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| width="50%" |
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*[[Packing lists by country]]
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*[[Training by country]] 
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*[[Living conditions and volunteer lifestyles by country]]
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*[[Health care and safety by country]]
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*[[Diversity and cross-cultural issues by country]]
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*[[FAQs by country]]
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*[[History of the Peace Corps by country]] 
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|}
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</div>
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The Peace Corps first received a formal invitation from Guyana in 1966, the year of the country’s independence. From 1966 until 1971, more than 160 Volunteers served in Guyana with the Peace Corps. At that time, education Volunteers broadened the school curricula to include technical and vocational subjects, including home economics, crafts, and manual arts. Technicians, architects, and engineers also assisted in developing and carrying out plans of Guyana’s Ministry of Works and Hydraulics. The Guyana program was discontinued in 1971, after the government of Guyana requested all overseas voluntary agencies to leave.  
+
This section has been compiled by Volunteers serving in [[Tanzania]] and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight limit on baggage. Luggage should be durable, lockable, and easy to carry. Because you will probably travel a lot by bus, duffel bags or small internal frame backpacks are more practical than suitcases.  
  
In 1993, the Guyanese government, led by President Cheddi Jagan, approached the Peace Corps about the prospects for the Peace Corps to reopen its program in Guyana. In March 1995, the Peace Corps officially reopened a joint Peace Corps office for Suriname and Guyana. The first Volunteers arrived in 1995, serving in the areas of community health and youth development. In 1997, Peace Corps/Guyana and Peace Corps/ Suriname split to form two separate programs. Approximately 30 Volunteers arrive each year to work in the community health project and the education and community development project (which includes information technology). In total, more than 380 Volunteers have served in Guyana with the Peace Corps.  
+
There are numerous used clothes markets throughout Tanzania where you can purchase inexpensive clothing.  Tailors can also make clothing for you. It is possible in the early weeks of training to buy most clothing you will need or to expand on what you have brought. Think of East Africa as the world’s largest thrift store; the clothing will all be familiar to you. Once at site, you can pick up quality used clothing at markets that are adequate for your service. Clothing found at markets generally range from $1-$5 for an article of clothing. In addition, clothes in Tanzania are hand washed, hung dry and ironed. Therefore, cotton items generally tend to stretch out over time and some materials are not durable enough to endure hand washing.  
  
Volunteers serve at sites ranging from the capital city of Georgetown, with a population of 300,000, to small, remote villages with populations fewer than 300. They are affiliated with a variety of schools, nongovernmental agencies, and government health facilities. The work of Peace Corps Volunteers in Guyana is well-received by the people of the communities in which they serve.  
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[http://www.rushtonfinancial.com.au Market Neutral] | [http://www.rushtonfinancial.com.au/why-invest Global Funds]
 +
===General Clothing ===
  
===History and Future of Peace Corps Programming in Guyana===
+
Tanzanians generally dress more conservatively than Americans do. During pre-service training and in office or school settings, you will be expected to dress professionally.  This means closed-toe shoes or sandals, trousers (not jeans), and shirts with collars for men and below-the-knee dresses or skirts for women. Although you can dress more casually while at home, most Tanzanians do not approve of short shorts, tank tops, or dirty or ripped clothing.
  
Volunteers address educational, health, and technical concerns by providing community health education, literacy, life skills and academic training, and information technology in collaboration with relevant ministries and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). They assist existing efforts to facilitate community involvement, train service providers, and introduce new training and teaching methodologies. Today, there are nearly 50 Peace Corps Volunteers serving in Guyana in nine of the country’s 10 regions.  
+
In the following lists, items marked with an asterisk are difficult to find or very expensive to buy in Tanzania or are of poor quality.  
  
====Community Health Education Project====
+
* One or two pairs of comfortable jeans or khakis (especially important for environment Volunteers who should bring three)
 +
* Sleepwear
 +
* Two sweaters, fleece tops, or warm jackets and a stocking cap (some places in the southern highlands get cold in June and July)
 +
* Hat and sunglasses
 +
* Swimsuit
 +
* One or two long-sleeved T-shirts
 +
* Windbreaker or rain jacket*
  
Under serious labor constraints, the Ministry of Health in Guyana is attempting to simultaneously strengthen and decentralize the country’s health delivery system. Depressed wages and salaries, a declining economy, and the flight of skills to more lucrative labor markets have worsened the situation. Therefore, the need for healthcare providers at all levels is acute.  
+
Note: If you have a specific brand you like or a unique piece of clothing or size that is hard to find, bring enough of that item for two years (e.g., size 13 shoes or sports bras are impossible to find).  
  
Peace Corps/Guyana’s community health project seeks to support the Ministry of Health’s primary healthcare program.
+
===For Women ===
  
Health education Volunteers are usually assigned to work with local health centers. In collaboration with local staff, they address primary and preventive healthcare issues such as breastfeeding, diarrhea, worms, coughs and colds, nutrition, sanitation, hygiene, and sexually transmitted illnesses (STIs), including HIV/AIDS. Health education Volunteers also work with community leaders, groups, and organizations to facilitate community health assessments and campaigns, and to design and implement community projects. Volunteers placed in this sector are challenged to develop innovative ways of taking health education outreach programs to schools, community groups, and youth.
+
* Three to five cotton or polyester dresses or skirts (below the knee or longer); these are required for training 2 Peace coRPS 
 +
* Two or three blouses or dressy shirts (no bare shoulders)
 +
* One extra-nice dress for official functions (e.g., swearing-in ceremony)
 +
* Socks* (Tanzanian women generally do not wear pantyhose)
 +
* Two-year supply of underwear* (women must wear bras and slips)
 +
* One pair of lightweight, quick-drying ankle pants for travel and when riding a bike or exercising
 +
* Five or six short-sleeved T-shirts
  
====Education and Community Development Project ====
+
===For Men ===
 +
* Three-to-five cotton or synthetic, dark-colored dress or casual pants
 +
* Six or seven button-down shirts (mix of short and long sleeved)
 +
* Two-year supply of underwear* and socks*
 +
* Three short-sleeved T-shirts
 +
* Two pairs of lightweight, quick-drying pants for travel, bike riding, and exercise
 +
* One jacket and tie for official functions
 +
* One or two pairs of shorts
  
Guyana’s process of nation-building is causing vast political, social, and economic changes. These changes are placing the nation’s youth, which constitute nearly 60 percent of the population, at great risk.
+
===Shoes ===
  
Guyana’s Ministry of Education has recognized an urgent need to refocus the country’s education system by improving the literacy and numeracy of the country’s youth and by enhancing teachers’ skills in providing literacy education. In addition to ongoing projects focusing on training youth in life-skills development, Peace Corps/Guyana’s community education project taps Volunteers to work directly with young students to improve their literacy skills and with teachers to promote literacy education.
+
* Two pairs of nice but comfortable shoes (to wear with professional clothes)
 +
* Durable walking shoes or hiking boots*
 +
* Sandals, e.g., Teva* brand or chacos* brand. Strongly recommended (a must for environment Volunteers)
 +
* One pair of sneakers or running shoes
 +
* Closed-toe shoes or dressy sandals
  
====Community Information Technology ====
 
  
In March 2000, the Ministry of Education invited Peace Corps/Guyana to play a role in the development of information technology (IT) as a curriculum subject within the school system. This ministry has introduced two educational development projects in some of the country’s schools: the secondary school reform project and the Guyana education access project. It is hoped that the two projects will have a direct impact on promoting IT among the nation’s young people.  
+
Note: hiking boots are only necessary if you’re going to be doing a lot of mountain climbing. Even then, fairly high-quality used boots are available in-country. Your best bet may be to buy a decent pair of tennis shoes which will be more than adequate 99 percent of the time. Also, flip-flops are available in abundance; don’t bring any!
  
Several Volunteers work directly in the schools, and all Volunteers are encouraged to assist informally with these projects in their area if possible. Activities include teaching students and teachers to use the technology, assisting with setting up computer labs, and interacting with the schools and community groups to ensure that the benefits of this technology reach the communities as well.
+
===Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items ===
  
====Future Programming Directions====
+
Most toiletries are readily available in Tanzania, but you may not find your favorite brand. You will not find good-quality hairbrushes or toothbrushes, and certain items will be comparatively expensive. Tampons (Tampax) may not be available near your site, and are no longer being provided by the Peace Corps Medical Office. It is recommended that you bring at least a three month supply of tampons, or a diva cup. Some Volunteers have highly recommended the new anti-bacterial lotion that you can just rub on your hands.
  
Guyana is one of the 15 countries benefiting from the President’s Emergency Program for AIDS Relief (Emergency Plan) and Peace Corps/Guyana Volunteers are mobilizing the communities in which they live and work to respond to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. It is the hope that this community organizing will lead to the development of community work plans and proposals for small projects that will be submitted to Peace Corps/Guyana for funding. Volunteers also encourage their communities to address other social issues, including orphans and vulnerable children, prevention of mother-tochild transmission, peer education/peer counseling, home-based care, voluntary counseling and testing, behavior change activities, vocational skills training, condom distribution, and community mobilization on HIV/AIDS projects that impact the spread of HIV in Guyana.
+
===Kitchen ===
  
===Assignment History===
+
Most household items are readily available but may not be of the best quality. If you like to cook, consider bringing some of the following items.
  
{| border="1" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="0"
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* Plastic ziploc storage bags of various sizes (a must to keep out unwanted crawling critters)*
|-
+
* Multipurpose cookbook* (Fannie Farmer is a favorite of Volunteers
| align="center" | '''[[Sector]]''' || '''[[Assignment]]''' || '''[[Beg. Yr]]''' || '''[[End. Yr]]'''
+
* Good kitchen knife*
|-
+
* Measuring cups and spoons
| rowspan="2" align="center"| '''[[Agriculture]]'''
+
* Mexican or your favorite, unique spices* (most other spices are available especially Italian and Indian spices)
| [[Ag Extension]]
+
* Various powdered mixes (e.g., soft-drink mixes, salad dressings, soups, and sauce packets) 4
| [[1995]]
+
| [[1995]]
+
|-
+
| [[Crop Extension]]
+
| [[1966]]
+
| [[1966]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="2" align="center"| '''[[Business]]'''
+
| [[Business Advising]]
+
| [[1995]]
+
| [[2004]]
+
|-
+
| [[Computer Science]]
+
| [[2001]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[Crisis Corps]]'''
+
| [[Crisis Corps]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="4" align="center"| '''[[Education]]'''
+
| [[English Teacher]]
+
| [[2001]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Prim-Ed/Teach Trn]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Secondary-Ed Math]]
+
| [[2001]]
+
| [[2005]]
+
|-
+
| [[Secondary-Ed Sci.]]
+
| [[2001]]
+
| [[2005]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="2" align="center"| '''[[Health]]'''
+
| [[Health Degreed]]
+
| [[1995]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| [[Health Extension]]
+
| [[1995]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="1" align="center"| '''[[UNV]]'''
+
| [[United Nations Volunteer]]
+
| [[1980]]
+
| [[1991]]
+
|-
+
| rowspan="2" align="center"| '''[[Youth and Community Development]]'''
+
| [[Commun. Serv/Deg.]]
+
| [[1995]]
+
| [[2000]]
+
|-
+
| [[Youth Development]]
+
| [[1996]]
+
| [[2007]]
+
|-
+
|}
+
  
[[Category:Guyana]]
+
 
 +
===Entertainment ===
 +
 
 +
Volunteers often have downtime, so bringing some of the items suggested below can make a difference. But remember that most rural areas do not have electricity. Consider bringing a good supply of batteries, including solar-powered batteries or rechargeable batteries and a charger. Please note that in Tanzania the electricity that is used is 210V.
 +
 
 +
* Tape player or Walkman with small speakers and tapes (prerecorded and blank); for those without electricity, a Walkman uses fewer batteries than a large tape player
 +
* Shortwave radio
 +
* Camera and film
 +
* Binoculars
 +
* Musical instruments (plus extra strings, reeds, etc.)
 +
* Sport, hobby, and art equipment and supplies
 +
* Games (e.g., cards, dice, hacky sack, yo-yos, Frisbee, juggling balls, dominoes)
 +
* Camping gear (tent, backpack, sleeping pad, etc.), if you are interested in camping
 +
* Books
 +
 
 +
===Miscellaneous ===
 +
 
 +
* A small current converter (if you bring small appliances like a shaver, etc.)
 +
* One set of sheets with pillowcase
 +
* English dictionary and/or thesaurus
 +
* Multi-purpose knife (e.g., Swiss Army knife, Leatherman or Gerber; a must for environment Volunteers)
 +
* Flashlight/headlamp and batteries (Note that AAA batteries are hard to come by 5
 +
* A small amount of seeds to plant, especially herbs for the garden
 +
* A solar battery charger and rechargeable batteries
 +
*      Solar bulbs or/and solar power panels. With a power panel you can charge your cell or any other low-voltage USB-port devices, such as IPod, Kindle, etc. All you need is sun, and that's plentiful. You may want to check the Nokero and Solio products. Peace Corps Volunteers get a 25%-50% discount on Nokero products when they join
 +
* Combination padlocks of various sizes (good key locks can be found in-country)
 +
* Sewing kit
 +
* Photos of your home and family (your neighbors will love them)
 +
* Sturdy water bottle (e.g., Nalgene)
 +
* Plastic egg carrier
 +
* Money belt (critical for traveling on public transport)
 +
* Travel alarm clock
 +
* Shoe waterproofing kit
 +
* Duct or packing tape
 +
* Day pack
 +
* Journal or diary
 +
* U.S. stamps (to send mail with people returning home)
 +
* Traveler’s checks for vacation travel
 +
* For education Volunteers, a couple of high-quality secondary-level textbooks (Peace Corps/Tanzania has a resource library, and you will get some books in training for basic needs, but we suggest that you leave some items with friends or family to send you after you have moved to your site.
 +
Special Considerations for Environmental Volunteers
 +
 
 +
Women: Cut back on the number of skirts you bring. And remember that loose-fitting skirts are best because you will be jumping gullies and riding bikes in them. Cut back on blouses, too. Substitute one pair of pants with a pair of Capri pants.
 +
 
 +
Men: Cut back on the number of pants. At most, bring three button-down shirts.
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Tanzania]]

Revision as of 22:05, 10 December 2015

Country Resources

This section has been compiled by Volunteers serving in Tanzania and is based on their experience. Use it as an informal guide in making your own list, bearing in mind that experience is individual. There is no perfect list! You obviously cannot bring everything we mention, so consider those items that make the most sense to you personally and professionally. You can always have things sent to you later. As you decide what to bring, keep in mind that you have an 80-pound weight limit on baggage. Luggage should be durable, lockable, and easy to carry. Because you will probably travel a lot by bus, duffel bags or small internal frame backpacks are more practical than suitcases.

There are numerous used clothes markets throughout Tanzania where you can purchase inexpensive clothing. Tailors can also make clothing for you. It is possible in the early weeks of training to buy most clothing you will need or to expand on what you have brought. Think of East Africa as the world’s largest thrift store; the clothing will all be familiar to you. Once at site, you can pick up quality used clothing at markets that are adequate for your service. Clothing found at markets generally range from $1-$5 for an article of clothing. In addition, clothes in Tanzania are hand washed, hung dry and ironed. Therefore, cotton items generally tend to stretch out over time and some materials are not durable enough to endure hand washing.

Market Neutral | Global Funds

General Clothing

Tanzanians generally dress more conservatively than Americans do. During pre-service training and in office or school settings, you will be expected to dress professionally. This means closed-toe shoes or sandals, trousers (not jeans), and shirts with collars for men and below-the-knee dresses or skirts for women. Although you can dress more casually while at home, most Tanzanians do not approve of short shorts, tank tops, or dirty or ripped clothing.

In the following lists, items marked with an asterisk are difficult to find or very expensive to buy in Tanzania or are of poor quality.

  • One or two pairs of comfortable jeans or khakis (especially important for environment Volunteers who should bring three)
  • Sleepwear
  • Two sweaters, fleece tops, or warm jackets and a stocking cap (some places in the southern highlands get cold in June and July)
  • Hat and sunglasses
  • Swimsuit
  • One or two long-sleeved T-shirts
  • Windbreaker or rain jacket*

Note: If you have a specific brand you like or a unique piece of clothing or size that is hard to find, bring enough of that item for two years (e.g., size 13 shoes or sports bras are impossible to find).

For Women

  • Three to five cotton or polyester dresses or skirts (below the knee or longer); these are required for training 2 Peace coRPS
  • Two or three blouses or dressy shirts (no bare shoulders)
  • One extra-nice dress for official functions (e.g., swearing-in ceremony)
  • Socks* (Tanzanian women generally do not wear pantyhose)
  • Two-year supply of underwear* (women must wear bras and slips)
  • One pair of lightweight, quick-drying ankle pants for travel and when riding a bike or exercising
  • Five or six short-sleeved T-shirts

For Men

  • Three-to-five cotton or synthetic, dark-colored dress or casual pants
  • Six or seven button-down shirts (mix of short and long sleeved)
  • Two-year supply of underwear* and socks*
  • Three short-sleeved T-shirts
  • Two pairs of lightweight, quick-drying pants for travel, bike riding, and exercise
  • One jacket and tie for official functions
  • One or two pairs of shorts

Shoes

  • Two pairs of nice but comfortable shoes (to wear with professional clothes)
  • Durable walking shoes or hiking boots*
  • Sandals, e.g., Teva* brand or chacos* brand. Strongly recommended (a must for environment Volunteers)
  • One pair of sneakers or running shoes
  • Closed-toe shoes or dressy sandals


Note: hiking boots are only necessary if you’re going to be doing a lot of mountain climbing. Even then, fairly high-quality used boots are available in-country. Your best bet may be to buy a decent pair of tennis shoes which will be more than adequate 99 percent of the time. Also, flip-flops are available in abundance; don’t bring any!

Personal Hygiene and Toiletry Items

Most toiletries are readily available in Tanzania, but you may not find your favorite brand. You will not find good-quality hairbrushes or toothbrushes, and certain items will be comparatively expensive. Tampons (Tampax) may not be available near your site, and are no longer being provided by the Peace Corps Medical Office. It is recommended that you bring at least a three month supply of tampons, or a diva cup. Some Volunteers have highly recommended the new anti-bacterial lotion that you can just rub on your hands.

Kitchen

Most household items are readily available but may not be of the best quality. If you like to cook, consider bringing some of the following items.

  • Plastic ziploc storage bags of various sizes (a must to keep out unwanted crawling critters)*
  • Multipurpose cookbook* (Fannie Farmer is a favorite of Volunteers
  • Good kitchen knife*
  • Measuring cups and spoons
  • Mexican or your favorite, unique spices* (most other spices are available especially Italian and Indian spices)
  • Various powdered mixes (e.g., soft-drink mixes, salad dressings, soups, and sauce packets) 4


Entertainment

Volunteers often have downtime, so bringing some of the items suggested below can make a difference. But remember that most rural areas do not have electricity. Consider bringing a good supply of batteries, including solar-powered batteries or rechargeable batteries and a charger. Please note that in Tanzania the electricity that is used is 210V.

  • Tape player or Walkman with small speakers and tapes (prerecorded and blank); for those without electricity, a Walkman uses fewer batteries than a large tape player
  • Shortwave radio
  • Camera and film
  • Binoculars
  • Musical instruments (plus extra strings, reeds, etc.)
  • Sport, hobby, and art equipment and supplies
  • Games (e.g., cards, dice, hacky sack, yo-yos, Frisbee, juggling balls, dominoes)
  • Camping gear (tent, backpack, sleeping pad, etc.), if you are interested in camping
  • Books

Miscellaneous

  • A small current converter (if you bring small appliances like a shaver, etc.)
  • One set of sheets with pillowcase
  • English dictionary and/or thesaurus
  • Multi-purpose knife (e.g., Swiss Army knife, Leatherman or Gerber; a must for environment Volunteers)
  • Flashlight/headlamp and batteries (Note that AAA batteries are hard to come by 5
  • A small amount of seeds to plant, especially herbs for the garden
  • A solar battery charger and rechargeable batteries
  • Solar bulbs or/and solar power panels. With a power panel you can charge your cell or any other low-voltage USB-port devices, such as IPod, Kindle, etc. All you need is sun, and that's plentiful. You may want to check the Nokero and Solio products. Peace Corps Volunteers get a 25%-50% discount on Nokero products when they join
  • Combination padlocks of various sizes (good key locks can be found in-country)
  • Sewing kit
  • Photos of your home and family (your neighbors will love them)
  • Sturdy water bottle (e.g., Nalgene)
  • Plastic egg carrier
  • Money belt (critical for traveling on public transport)
  • Travel alarm clock
  • Shoe waterproofing kit
  • Duct or packing tape
  • Day pack
  • Journal or diary
  • U.S. stamps (to send mail with people returning home)
  • Traveler’s checks for vacation travel
  • For education Volunteers, a couple of high-quality secondary-level textbooks (Peace Corps/Tanzania has a resource library, and you will get some books in training for basic needs, but we suggest that you leave some items with friends or family to send you after you have moved to your site.

Special Considerations for Environmental Volunteers

Women: Cut back on the number of skirts you bring. And remember that loose-fitting skirts are best because you will be jumping gullies and riding bikes in them. Cut back on blouses, too. Substitute one pair of pants with a pair of Capri pants.

Men: Cut back on the number of pants. At most, bring three button-down shirts.