Difference between pages "List of resources for Fiji" and "Squash - el zapallo"

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(New page: We offer a list of websites for you to search for additional information about the Peace Corps and Fiji, as well as to enable you to connect with returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs) wh...)
 
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We offer a list of websites for you to search for additional information about the Peace Corps and Fiji, as well as to enable you to connect with returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs) who have served here. It is difficult to track information as it is moved around on the Web, so please keep in mind as you conduct your search that we try to make sure all these links are active and current, but we cannot guarantee it.
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== Squash - el zapallo, la auyama ==
  
A note of caution: As you surf these sites, please also remember that you will find bulletin boards and chat rooms in which people are free to give opinions and advice based on their own experiences. The opinions expressed are not those of the Peace Corps or the United States government. You may also find opinions of people who were unhappy with their choice to serve in the Peace Corps. As you read these comments, we hope you will remember that the Peace Corps is not for everyone, and no two people experience their service in the same way.  
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[[Image:Auyama.JPG|left|frame|Auyama squash is a winter squash with a green shell
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and bright orange flesh inside.]]
  
===General Information About Fiji===
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'''Scientific name:''' ''Cucurbita maxima''
  
http://www.countrywatch.com <br>
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'''Discription:''' Zapallo in Panama Spanish indicates any squash. The most common kinds are zucchini and auyama (a type of winter squash). Winter Squash are a large vining crop, that produces gourds with orange flesh and large seeds that can be toasted.  
On this site, you can learn anything from what time it is in Tashkent to information about converting currency from the dollar to the ruble. Just click on your country of service and go from there.  
 
  
http://www.lonelyplanet.com/worldguide/destinations/pacific/fiji <br>
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'''How to sow:''' Plant squah in full sun in loose, well drained soil.  Direct sow into mounds. 3-5 seeds per mound10 feet between mounds.  Squash will not germinate in cool soil.  Plant 1 inch deep.
Visit this site to learn all you need to know about Fiji.  
 
  
http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/1834.htm <br>
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'''Days to germination:''' 10-14
This site is part of the U.S. State Department, which issues background notes periodically about countries around the world. Learn more about Fiji's social and political history.
 
  
http://www.geography.about.com/science/geography/library/maps/  <br>
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'''Days to fruit:''' 90-110
This online world atlas includes maps and geographical information about countries around the world. Each country page contains links to other sites, such as the Library of Congress, that contain comprehensive historical, social, and political backgrounds.
 
  
http://www.un.org/pubs/cyberschoolbus/infonation/ <br>
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'''Care:'''  Water each hill regularly, take care not to get the leaves wet.  This could promote fungus. Plants can be grown on a fence or trellis.
This United Nations site allows you to search for statistical information for member states of the U.N.  
 
  
http://www.fiji.gov.fj <br>
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'''Harvest:''' Squash are ready to harvest when you can not dent the skin with your thumb nail and they sound hollow when thumped. Twist the gourd in a circle or cut from the vine.  Do not pull.   Pulling can damage the vineStore the gourds in a cool dry place for months.
The official site for government of Fiji.  
 
  
http://www.bulafiji.com <br>
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'''Seed Saving:'''  When the fruit is ripe for eating, the seeds are ripe tooRemove the seeds
This is the Fiji Islands Visitor's Bureau website. While it is geared toward travelers, there is useful information on history and culture.  
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from the center of the squash and wash off the stringy pulp around them. Let the seeds dry for several days on a screen or paper in a warm dry place.  Plant the seeds immediately or save them in a paper bag for up to three months unrefridgerated.  They can be saved longer with refridgeration.
  
http://www.fijitimes.com  <br>
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'''Health:''' Rich in vitamin A (beta carotene), potasium, fiber, manganese and vitamin C.
Fiji has three daily newspapers printed in English, Fiji Live, Fiji Sun, and this one, the Fiji Times.  
 
  
===Connect With Returned Volunteers and Other Invitees ===
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[[Image:Squash_Blossoms.JPG|right|frame|The female flower is on the left and the male on the right. Notice the bulb under the flower, that is what will grow into the squash.]] '''Tips:''' Many people get frustrated that their vines are flowering, but not producing squashThis is usually because the vines start by flowering male blossoms, then start flowering male and female. You can tell which flowers are female because they have a small lump under the flower that will become the squash. See photo at right.
 
 
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/peacecorps2/  <br>
 
This Yahoo site hosts a bulletin board where prospective Volunteers and returned Volunteers can come together.
 
 
 
http://www.rpcv.org  <br>
 
This is the site of the National Peace Corps Association, made up of returned Volunteers. On this site you can find links to all the Web pages of the “friends of” groups for most countries of service, made up of former Volunteers who served in those countries. There are also regional groups who frequently get together for social events and local Volunteer activities.
 
 
 
http://www.fofiji.org/  <br>
 
This is the Friends of Fiji website hosted by returned Peace Corps Volunteers from Fiji.  
 
 
 
===International Development Sites About Fiji===
 
 
 
http://www.crc.uri.edu  <br>
 
Coastal Links Coastal Resources Center
 
 
 
http://www.usp.ac.fj/marine  <br>
 
University of the South Pacific's School of Marine Studies
 
 
 
http://www.sprep.org <br>
 
Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP).
 
 
 
http://www.adb.org/About/default.asp  <br>
 
Asian Development Bank in Fiji
 
 
 
http://www.un.org/esa/agenda21/natlinfo/countr/fiji/index.htm  <br>
 
United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Division of Sustainable Development
 
 
 
http://www.undp.org.fj <br>
 
United Nations Development Programme—Fiji Multi Country Office
 
 
 
http://www.sidsnet.org  <br>
 
Small Island Developing States Network
 
 
 
http://www.wpro.who.int/countries/fiji  <br>
 
World Health Organization in Pacific
 
 
 
http://www.acys.utas.edu.au  <br>
 
Australian Clearinghouse for Youth Studies
 
 
 
http://www.spc.int/youth  <br>
 
Pacific Youth Bureau
 
 
 
===Recommended Books===
 
 
 
# Derrick, R.A. A History of Fiji. Suva, Fiji: Government Press, 2001.
 
# Lal, Brij V. Broken Waves: A History of the Fiji Islands in the 20th Century. HI: University of Hawaii Press, 1992.2.
 
# Geraghty, Paul A. Fijian: Lonely Planet Phrasebook. Footscray, Victoria: Lonely Planet Publications, 1994. 
 
# Insight Guides. Insight Pocket Guide Fiji Islands, 2003.
 
# Stanley, David. Moon Handbooks Fiji. CA: Avalon Travel Publishing, 2004.
 
# Vaisutis, Justine and Mark Dapin, Lonely Planet Fiji, Lonely Planet Publications, June 2006.
 
 
 
===Books About the History of the Peace Corps===
 
 
 
# Hoffman, Elizabeth Cobbs. All You Need is Love: The Peace Corps and the Spirit of the 1960’s. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2000.
 
# Rice, Gerald T. The Bold Experiment: JFK’s Peace Corps. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1985.
 
# Stossel, Scott. Sarge: The Life and Times of Sargent Shriver. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 2004.
 
 
 
===Books on the Volunteer Experience ===
 
 
 
# Banerjee, Dillon. So You Want to Join the Peace Corps: What to Know Before You Go. Berkeley, Calif.: Ten Speed Press, 2000.
 
# Casebolt, Marjorie DeMoss. Margarita: A Guatemalan Peace Corps Experience. Gig Harbor, Wash.: Red Apple Publishing, 2000.
 
# Dirlam, Sharon. Beyond Siberia: Two Years in a Forgotten Place. Santa Barbara, Calif.: McSeas Books, 2004.
 
# Erdman, Sarah. Nine Hills to Nambonkaha: Two Years in the Heart of an African Village. New York, N.Y.: Picador, 2003.
 
# Herrera, Susana. Mango Elephants in the Sun: How Life in an African Village Let Me Be in My Skin. Boston: Shambhala Publications, 1999
 
# Hessler, Peter. River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze. New York, N.Y.: Perennial, 2001.
 
# Kennedy, Geraldine ed. From the Center of the Earth: Stories out of the Peace Corps. Santa Monica, Calif.: Clover Park Press, 1991.
 
# Thompsen, Moritz. Living Poor: A Peace Corps Chronicle. Seattle, Wash.: University of Washington Press, 1997 (reprint).
 
 
 
 
 
[[Category:Fiji]]
 

Latest revision as of 13:16, 23 August 2016

Squash - el zapallo, la auyama

File:Auyama.JPG
Auyama squash is a winter squash with a green shell and bright orange flesh inside.

Scientific name: Cucurbita maxima

Discription: Zapallo in Panama Spanish indicates any squash. The most common kinds are zucchini and auyama (a type of winter squash). Winter Squash are a large vining crop, that produces gourds with orange flesh and large seeds that can be toasted.

How to sow: Plant squah in full sun in loose, well drained soil. Direct sow into mounds. 3-5 seeds per mound. 10 feet between mounds. Squash will not germinate in cool soil. Plant 1 inch deep.

Days to germination: 10-14

Days to fruit: 90-110

Care: Water each hill regularly, take care not to get the leaves wet. This could promote fungus. Plants can be grown on a fence or trellis.

Harvest: Squash are ready to harvest when you can not dent the skin with your thumb nail and they sound hollow when thumped. Twist the gourd in a circle or cut from the vine. Do not pull. Pulling can damage the vine. Store the gourds in a cool dry place for months.

Seed Saving: When the fruit is ripe for eating, the seeds are ripe too. Remove the seeds from the center of the squash and wash off the stringy pulp around them. Let the seeds dry for several days on a screen or paper in a warm dry place. Plant the seeds immediately or save them in a paper bag for up to three months unrefridgerated. They can be saved longer with refridgeration.

Health: Rich in vitamin A (beta carotene), potasium, fiber, manganese and vitamin C.

File:Squash Blossoms.JPG
The female flower is on the left and the male on the right. Notice the bulb under the flower, that is what will grow into the squash.
Tips: Many people get frustrated that their vines are flowering, but not producing squash. This is usually because the vines start by flowering male blossoms, then start flowering male and female. You can tell which flowers are female because they have a small lump under the flower that will become the squash. See photo at right.