Continuing Services

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For many of us, the work we did in-country doesn't stop once we return home. A number of RPCVs have started their own non-profits to benefit their former host countries, non-profits similar to the work done while in Peace Corps and many other initiatives. Below is a list of resources for those groups and organizations seeking resources while conituing their services.

Non-Profit Opportunities

Grant Research

Grants Opportunities

Foundation Grant Sources

  • The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation - The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation makes grants to address the most serious social and environmental problems facing society, where risk capital, responsibly invested, may make a difference over time. The Foundation places a high value on sustaining and improving institutions that make positive contributions to society.
  • The WK Kellog Foundation - The WK Kellogg Foundation is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to apply knowledge to solve the problems of people. The founder, W.K. Kellogg, the cereal industry pioneer, established the Foundation in 1930. Since its beginning, the Foundation has continuously focused on building the capacity of individuals, communities, and institutions to solve their own problems.
  • The Charles Stewart Mott Foundation - The Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, established in 1926 in Flint by an automotive pioneer, is a private philanthropy committed to supporting projects that promote a just, equitable and sustainable society.
  • The Skoll Foundation - The Skoll Foundation's mission is to advance systemic change to benefit communities around the world by investing in, connecting, and celebrating social entrepreneurs. Social Edge, an online community sponsored by the Skoll Foundation, connects social entrepreneurs and other thought leaders, engaging them in dialogue and discussion and promoting information sharing and learning.

NPCA Grant Sources

  • The Shriver Award for Humanitarian Service - The Shriver Award for Humanitarian Service is awarded by the National Peace Corps Association to a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer who continues to make a sustained and distinguished contribution to humanitarian causes at home or abroad. The award was named to recognize the tremendous contributions of the first Peace Corps Director, Sargent Shriver, in the founding and development of the Peace Corps.
  • The Loret Miller Ruppe Award for Outstanding Community Service - The Ruppe Award is presented annually by the NPCA to an outstanding affiliated group for a project or projects that promote the Third Goal of Peace Corps or continue to serve host countries, build group spirit and cooperation, and promote service. The purpose of the award is not only to recognize the great work that its groups are doing, but also to generate ideas that other groups may emulate in their communities.
  • Continuation of Service Grants - Grants of up to $1,000 for affiliated groups annually to support community-based development projects at home and abroad. Following the NPCA staff determination that there are eligible finalists to recommend for this grant, an independent awards review panel determines a final winner.
  • The NPCA Website Award - This award honors those groups that have labored to create and maintain effective new media services for "bringing the world back home" and enhancing the RPCV community.
  • The Newsletter Award - The importance of a newsletter to the success of an RPCV group cannot be overestimated. For this reason, the NPCA recognizes the best newsletters from its affiliate groups in two categories: editorial content and structure.

Work and Volunteer Opportunities